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Full text of "St. Mary's School Bulletin"

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S^MARY'S 

SCHOOL 




1919-20 



BULLETIN 



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I'ANUKWlli; VIFVi UK >I MARYX lULElCH, N 



July, 1919 



Series 8, No. 2 



St. Mary's School 



BULLETIN 




RALEIGH, N. C. 

CATALOGUE 
NUMBER 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as second class matter 
under Act of Congress of July 16. 1894 



mg$ Mary!s School 



CALENDAR 



1919 



MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 



1920 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 
18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 31 


1 2 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 
4 5 6 7 8 9 10 
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

14 15 16 17 18 19 20 

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 

28 29 30 


12 3 4 
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 31 



1921 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 
30 31 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 


12 3 4 5 
6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 
3 4 5 6 7 8 19 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 



CALENDAR FOR 1919-1920 



1919 

September 1 5, Monday Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 1 6, Tuesday Registration and Classification of City Students ; 

New Boarding Students report by 7 P. M. 

September 17, Wednesday Preliminary Examinations; Old Boarding Stu- 
dents report by 7 P. M.; Registration and Classi- 
fication of Boarding Students. 

September 1 8, Thursday Opening service of Advent Term (First Half- 
year) at 9 A. M. 

November 1, Saturday All Saints: Founders' Day. 

November 20, Thursday Second Quarter begins. 

November 27, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. 

December 1 8, Thursday Christmas Recess begins at 3 P. M. 

1920 

January 6, Tuesday All Boarding Students report by 7 P. M. 

January 22, Thursday Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February 1 8, Ash Wednesday .... Lent begins. 

March 18, Thursday Last Quarter begins. 

March 28, Palm Sunday Annual visit of the Bishop for Confirmation. 

April 2, Good Friday Holy Day. 

April 4 Easter Day. 

May 12, Wednesday Alumnae Day: 78th Anniversary of the Found- 
ing of St. Mary's. 
May 23-25 Commencement Season. 

September 16, Thursday 79th Session begins. 



No absence from the school is allowed at or near 
Thanksgiving Day, Washington's Birthday, or from 
Palm Sunday to Easter, inclusive. The only recess 
is at Christmas. 



tiw° 



IN./ 



INDEX 

The Calendar for 1919-1920 3 

The Board of Trustees 5 

The Faculty and Officers 6 

Foreword 9 

History and Description of the School 11 

Educational Position 13 

Equipment 15 

The Life 17 

The School Work. 21 

The Student Organizations 22 

Work of the Departments 25 

Preparatory 25 

The College 25 

Admission 27 

Certificates 29 

Examination, Special Courses 30-31 

Classification, Graduation 31-32 

Awards, College Entrance Certificate 33 

Requirements for Certificates and Credits 35 

The Regular Academic Course 36 

The College Preparatory Course 37 

The "College" Course 38 

The Courses in Detail 41 

History 41 

English and Literature 43 

Foreign Languages, Ancient and Modern 46 

Mathematics 49 

Natural Science 52 

"Philosophy" 53 

Pedagogy 54 

Bible Study 55 

Music Department 56 

Art Department 67 

Business Department 69 

Expression Department , 71 

Home Economics Department 74 

Physical Training Department 79 

General Regulations 82 

Requisites 88 

Terms 89 

Scholarships 94 

The Alumnae 96 

Register of Students, 1918-1919 98 

Commencement Awards 1 03 

Form of Bequest 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



THE BISHOPS 

Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, D.D., Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. William Alexander Guerry, D.D Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D.D Asheville, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D.D Wilmington, N. C. 

CLERICAL AND LAY TRUSTEES 

North Carolina 

Rev. J. E. Ingle, Raleigh Rev. M. A. Barber Raleigh 

Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, Henderson 

Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh 

Mr. Graham Andrews, Raleigh Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham 
(until 1924) (until 1921) 

East Carolina 

Rev. G. F. Hill, Elizabeth City Rev. R. B. Drane, D.D., Edenton 

Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton 

(until 1924) (until 1921) 

South Carolina 

Rev. T. T. Walsh, Yorkville Rev. L. G. Wood, New York City 

Mr. P. T. Hayne, Greenville Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston 

(until 1920) (until 1920) 

Asheville 

Rev. F. P. Lobdell, Rutherfordton Rev. H. N. Bowne, Tryon 

Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton Mr. W. D. Anderson, Gastonia 

(until 1922) (until 1920) 

Executive Committee 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D.D., Chairman 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson Dr. R. H. Lewis 

Hon. W. A. Hoke Mr. George C. Royall 

Mr. D. Y. Cooper 

Secretary and Treasurer 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr., Raleigh, N. C. 

Committee on Raising the Building and Endowment Fund 

Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, Chairman 
Mr. George C. Royall Mr. Graham H. Andrews 

Special Representative of the Trustees for the Purpose of 
Raising the Fund 

Rev. Francis M. Osborne, Raleigh, N. C. 



THE FACULTY AND OFFICERS OF 
ST. MARY'S 

1919-20 

Rev. WARREN W. WAY Rector 

Mrs. CHARLES E. PERKINS Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary and Business Manager 



THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

Rev. WARREN W. WAY Bible and Ethics 

(A.B., Hobart College, 1897; General Theological Seminary. Rector of Grace 
Church, Cortland, N. Y., 1900-14; Rector of St. Luke's Church, Salisbury, 
1914-18. Rector of St. Mary's, 1918—) 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and Political Science 

(A.B., Harvard, 1882. Principal, Edenton (N. C.) Academy, 1901-02; Master 
in Porter Academy, Charleston, 1902-03. St. Mary's, 1903—) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Psychology and Current History 

(A.B., Washington College, Md., 1897; A.M., 1898; graduate student Johns 
Hopkins University, 1900. St. Mary's, 1903—) 

FRANCES RANNEY BOTTUM Science 

(San Diego (Cal.) Normal College, 1910-11; graduate St. Mary's, 1912; summer 
student, Teacher's College, Columbia University, 1913, 1914; George Pea- 
body College for Teachers, 1916-19. St. Mary's, 1912—) 

LEAH AUGUSTA DENNIS English 

(A.B., Northwestern University, 1913; A.M., 1914. Teacher in Grafton Hall, 
1914; Southern College, Petersburg, Va., 1917-18. St. Mary's, 1918—) 

MARY SEARLE Mathematics 

(B.S., Wellesley College, 1887. Teacher in Miss Hall's School, Baltimore, 1891- 
1900; The Arundell School, Baltimore, 1900-16; Sweet Briar College, 1916-19. 
St. Mary's, 1919—) 

GRACE EVANS ST. JOHN English 

(A.B., Barnard College, Columbia University, 1916. Teacher in Hardwick 
Academy, Vt., 1916-17; Millville (N. J.) High School, 1917-18. St. Mary's, 
1919—) 

ELIZABETH E. SHEARER French 

(A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1896; graduate student, Columbia University; 
student in France and Italy; Associate Member Archaeological Society of 
America. Teacher in Brooklyn Heights Seminary, N. Y.; Queens College, 
Charlotte, 1914-17; Shorter College, Ga., 1917-19. St. Mary's, 1919—) 

LOULIE M. WILSON Latin 

(B.A., Sweet Briar College, 1912; student, Winthrop College, S. C, 1905-08; 
summer session, Columbia University, 1918. Teacher in St. Margaret's Hall, 
Boise, 1913-15; The Cathedral School, Orlando, Fla., 1916-17; St. Jeanne's 
School, Roanoke, Va., 1917-19. St. Mary's, 1919—) 

KATHERINE QUACKENBOS Spanish and French 

(A.B., Barnard College, 1917. St. Mary's, 1919—) 

FLORENCE C. DAVIS Elocution 

(B.O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College; Posse Gymnasium. 
St. Mary's, 1911—) 



St. Mary's Bulletin 



AMAIE BIERCE Physical Director 

(Graduate The Savage School for Physical Education, New York City, 1916; 
Teacher Brerestead School, Lake George, 1916-17; Brantwood Hall, N. Y., 
1917-18. St. Mary's, 1918—) 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

R. BLINN OWEN, Director Voice, Organ 

(M.Mus., Detroit School of Music; pupil of Zimmermann, Mazurette, Theo. 
Beach of Detroit; Kreutschmar, in New York, Ellison Van Hoose; Teacher 
in Detroit and New York; private teacher in Bluefield, W. Va., and Greens- 
boro, N. C., 1906-09; Organist and Choir Director, Christ Church, Raleigh, 
1909-18; Director St. Cecelia Club, etc. St. Mary's, 1909—; Director of Music, 
1917—) 

MARTHA A. DOWD Piano, Theory, History of Music 

(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1884; pupil of Kuersteiner, Sophus Wiig, Albert Mack; 
of Edwin Farmer in New York, 1915; President N. C. Music Teachers' Asso- 
ciation, 1916— St. Mary's, 1886—; Director of Music, 1908-17) 

EBIE ROBERTS Piano 

(Pupil in Piano of James P. Brawley, Blinn Owen; in Harmony of John A. 
Simpson; in Organ of Wade Brown; Certificate in the Burroughs Method; 
Columbia University, summer session, 1916. Private teacher; St. Mary's, 
1913—) 

GUSTAV HAGEDORN Violin 

(Pupil of Adolph Hahn and Leopold Lichtenberg; of Issay Barmas and Edgar 
Stillman Kelly, Berlin. Five years member of the Cincinnati Symphony Or- 
chestra; Professor of Violin, Orchestra Instruments, etc., Meredith College, 
1906-15; Dean of the Meredith College School of Music, 1912-15; Director of 
Music, University of North Carolina Summer School, 1912—; President 
N. C. Music Teachers' Association, 1913-14. St. Mary's, 1916—) 

SUE KYLE SOUTHWICK Piano 

(Graduate New England Conservatory, 1918. Private teacher, Alvin and Gal- 
veston, Texas, 1911-17. St. Mary's, 1918—) 

MARGUERITE WEBSTER GESNER Voice 

(Graduate New England Conservatory, 1919. St. Mary's, 1919—) 

ART DEPARTMENT 

CLARA I. FENNER, Director Drawing, Painting, Design, etc. 

(Graduate Maryland Institute School of Art and Design; special student 
Pratt Institute, 1905; special student in Paris, 1907. Director of Art, St. 
Mary's, 1892-96: 1902—) 



EXPRESSION DEPARTMENT 

FLORENCE C. DAVIS, Director Elocution, Dramatic Art 

(B.O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College, N. Y.; Posse Gym- 
nasium, Boston; pupil of Edith Herrick, Boston, summers 1911-13-14 (Leland 
Powers Method). Private studio, Elmira; substitute teacher, Miss Metcalf's 
School, Tarrytown, 1908; teacher, Reidsville Seminary, N. C, 1909-11. 
Director of Expression, St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 



8 Si. Mary's Bulletin 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

LIZZIE H. LEE, Director Stenography, Typewriting, Bookkeeping 

(Director of the Department, 1896—) 



HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

GENEVIEVE LEGGETT Domestic Science, Domestic Art 

(Graduate Mechanics Institute, Rochester, N. Y., Household Science Normal 
Course, 1919. St. Mary's, 1919—) 



OFFICERS, 1919*20 



Rev. WARREN W. WAY Rector 

Mrs. CHARLES E. PERKINS Lady Principal 

Mrs. NANNIE H. MARRIOTT Dietitian 

Miss FLORENCE W. TALBOT Housekeeper 

Miss ANNIE ALEXANDER, R. N. Matron of the Infirmary 

(Graduate of S:. Vincent's Hospital, Norfolk, Va.) 

Dr. A. W. KNOX School Physician 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary and Business Manager 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Secretary to the Rector 

Miss ANNE NEAVE Office Secretary 




The Granddaughters of St. Mary's, 1919 
(Daughters, Granddaughters, and Great-Granddaughters of Former Pupils) 




Class Day 
The Student Procession 




The Director's Voice Studio 




The Mr Basketball Team, 1919 
Winners of the Inter-association Championship 



FOREWORD 

IN THIS foreword it is the purpose to make clear to those who 
are interested some of the special advantages and character- 
istics of St. Mary's: its well-earned prestige; its scholarship; 
its care for the health and well-being of the students; and its in- 
fluence on character building. 

St. Mary's is an old school. It has completed its seventy-seventh 
year, having been established by the Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D., 
in 1842. For twenty-two years it has been the property of the 
Episcopal Church in the two Carolinas. It is the largest, in the 
United States, of the boarding schools for young women main- 
tained by the Episcopal Church, and is also one of the oldest. The 
love and respect of former students brings yearly many of their 
daughters, granddaughters and, in a few instances, their great- 
granddaughters to their old school, and the devotion to St. Mary's 
ideals has potent influence now, as at all times, in her long history. 

On the side of the educational work accomplished, St. Mary's 
prepares students for admission to Women's Colleges of the highest 
standard, and gives two years of advanced work in its Junior and 
Senior classes. Its curriculum affords a complete and well-rounded 
education for that large number of young women who desire to do 
advanced work but do not care to take a full college standard A. B. 
course. 

Attention to the health of the students is of supreme importance 
at St. Mary's. It is the constant aim of all those in authority so to 
guard the girls as to prevent illness. The school has a modern in- 
firmary with a matron, who is a graduate nurse, always in charge; 
the school physician makes daily visits to the School, and is subject 
to call at any time; a directress of physical training examines each 
student, recommends such exercise as is needed in each individual 
case, and supervises all indoor and outdoor exercises and games with 
a view to proper and suitable physical development. 



10 St. Mary's Bulletin 

The sanitary conditions are in every way of the best; the use of 
modern preventive methods is urged as, for instance, inoculation 
against typhoid fever and smallpox; parents are at once informed 
of any outbreak of disease; the city water is of excellent quality. 
Intelligent attention to all these matters for many years has re- 
sulted in a remarkable freedom from serious illness or from epi- 
demic disease of any kind. 

Equal care is given to the safety of the students. No fire, of any 
kind, is used in any of the buildings occupied by students, except 
in the use of gas in the Home Economics Department. The fires 
for cooking and heating are in distant, separated buildings. Each 
building is equipped with fire extinguishers and fire escapes. In 
the main buildings there are two standpipes with continuous water 
pressure, hose long enough to reach to the farthest point, and with 
connection for the City Fire Department hose. 

St. Mary's has well won traditions for the refined and lady-like 
bearing of its students, a reputation which it is the privilege of the 
teachers of the present day to maintain. One of the first lessons 
that is learned by the new student is the fact that there are certain 
things which a St. Mary's girl may or may not do. The most im- 
pressive fact in the life of the school is the spiritual side, the develop- 
ment of high-minded, good women. No building at St. Mary's 
endears itself quite so much to the girls as the old chapel, where for 
so many years the girls have met for daily morning and evening 
prayer, imbibing unconsciously, perhaps, those aspirations for a 
higher, nobler life which result in developing and perfecting true 
womanhood. 



ST, MARY'S SCHOOL 

HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL was founded May 12th, 1842, by the 
Rev. Aldert Smedes, D.D. It was established as a church 
school for girls, and was for thirty-six years the chosen work 
of the founder, of whose life work Bishop Atkinson said: "It is 
my deliberate judgment that Dr. Smedes accomplished more for 
the advancement of this Diocese (North Carolina), and for the pro- 
motion of the best interests of society in its limits, than any man 
who ever lived in it." 

The present location was first set apart as the site for an Episcopal 
school in 1832, when influential churchmen, carrying out a plan 
proposed by Bishop Ives, purchased the present "Grove" as a part 
of a tract of 160 acres, to be used in establishing a Church school 
for boys. First the East Rock House, then West Rock House and 
the Main Building, now called Smedes Hall after the founder, were 
built for use in this boys' school. But the school, though it started 
out with great promise, proved unsuccessful, and was closed; and 
the property passed back into private hands. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes, a New Yorker by birth and education, had 
given up parish work on account of a weak throat, and was con- 
ducting a successful girls' school in New York City when in 1842 
Bishop Ives met him and laid before him the opportunity in his 
North Carolina diocese. The milder climate attracted Dr. Smedes; 
he determined on the effort; came to Raleigh with a corps of 
teachers; gave St. Mary's its name, and threw open its doors in 
May, 1842. 

From the first the school was a success, and for the remainder of 
his life Dr. Smedes allowed nothing to interrupt the work he had 
undertaken. During the years of the War between the States St. 
Mary's was at the same time school and refuge for those driven 



12 St. Mary's Bulletin 

from their homes. It is a tradition of which her daughters are 
proud, that during those years of struggle her doors were ever open, 
and that at one time the family of the beloved President of the 
Confederacy were sheltered within her walls. 

On April 25, 1877, Dr. Smedes died, leaving St. Mary's to the 
care of his son, Rev. Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had been during his 
father's lifetime a teacher in the school. This trust was regarded 
as sacred, and for twenty-two years, in which he spared neither 
pains nor expense, Dr. Bennett Smedes carried on his father's work 
for education. 

During this eventful half-century, St. Mary's was in the truest 
sense a Church school, but it was a private enterprise. The work 
and the responsibility were dependent upon the energy of the Drs. 
Smedes. Permanence required that the school should have a cor- 
porate existence and be established on a surer foundation as a 
power for good, and in 1897 Dr. Bennett Smedes proposed to the 
Diocese of North Carolina that the Church should take charge of 
the school. 

The offer was accepted; the Church assumed responsibility, ap- 
pointed Trustees, purchased the school equipment from Dr. Smedes 
and the real property from Mr. Cameron; and in the fall of 1897 a 
charter was granted by the General Assembly. 

By this act of the Assembly, and its later amendments, the present 
corporation — The Trustees of St. Mary's School — consisting of the 
Bishops of the Church in the Carolinas, and clerical and lay trustees 
from each diocese or district, was created. 

The Board of Trustees, by the terms of the charter, is empowered 
"to receive and hold lands of any value which may be granted, sold, 
devised or otherwise conveyed to said corporation, and shall also 
be capable in law to take, receive and possess all moneys, goods 
and chattels of any value and to any amount which may be given, 
sold or bequeathed to or for said corporation." 

The Church was without funds for the purchase of the school 
property, and the Trustees undertook a heavy debt in buying it, 



St Mary's Bulletin 13 

but the existence of this debt only slightly retarded the improve- 
ments which were made from year to year in the school buildings 
and equipment, and in May, 1906, this purchase debt .was lifted, 
and the School became the unencumbered property of the Church 
in the Carolinas. 

Under this ownership there have been great improvements in 
new equipment and new buildings, made possible largely by the 
legacy of Miss Eleanor Clement, a former teacher, and by the 
present campaign for an Endowment Fund. 

Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had long wished for the disposition of 
St. Mary's that was actually effected, continued as Rector after 
the Church assumed charge, until his death on February 22, 1 899. 
He was succeeded by the Rev. Theodore Dubose Bratton, Rector of 
the Church of the Advent, Spartanburg, S. C, who administered 
the affairs of the School very successfully until he entered upon his 
duties as Bishop of Mississippi in the summer of 1903, when Rev. 
McNeely Dubose, Rector of Trinity Church, Asheville, N. C, 
became Rector. Under his devoted and loving care the School con- 
tinued its usefulness for four years until his resignation in 1907 
when Rev. George W. Lay, of St. Paul's School, Concord, N. H. f 
took charge. His aggressive and active management for eleven 
years added greatly to the success of the School. The present 
Rector, Rev. Warren W. Way, formerly Rector of St. Luke's 
Church, Salisbury, N. G, began his duties in the summer of 1918. 



EDUCATIONAL POSITION. 

During the life of the founder, St. Mary's was a high-class school 
for the general education of girls, the training being regulated by 
the needs and exigencies of the times. Pupils finished their train- 
ing without "graduating." In 1879, under the second Rector, set 
courses were established, covering college preparatory work without 
sacrificing the special features for which the School stands, and in 
May, 1 879, the first class was regularly graduated. 



14 St. Mary's Bulletin 

By the provisions of the charter of 1897, the Faculty of St. 
Mary's, "with the advice and consent of the Board of Trustees, 
shall have the power to confer all such degrees and marks of dis- 
tinction as are usually conferred by colleges and universities," and 
at the annual meeting in May, 1900, the Trustees determined to 
establish the "College." This "College Course" at St. Mary's 
covers the requirements for entrance to colleges of the highest 
standard, followed by two years of advanced work. 

While High School graduates enter the Freshman Class at St. 
Mary's, it is possible for most of them to complete the course in 
three years. In a very few cases High School graduates have 
graduated in two years. The Junior and Senior courses are espe- 
cially designed to give an advanced and well-rounded course to 
students who do not intend to enter any higher institution of learn- 
ing, and the Academic work is supplemented, for those who desire 
it, by courses in departments of Music, Art, Home Economics, 
Business, and Expression. 

The organization, requirements and courses of each of these de- 
partments are described at length in this catalogue. 

A graduate of St. Mary's receives a diploma; but no degree has 
ever been conferred, although the power to confer degrees is specified 
in the charter. 

LOCATION 

Raleigh, the Capital of North Carolina, is very accessible. The 
Southern, the Seaboard Air Line, and the Norfolk Southern rail- 
roads give ready and rapid communication with points in all direc- 
tions, with through Pullman service, for example, from New York, 
Philadelphia, Washington, Richmond, Norfolk, Asheville, Atlanta, 
Jacksonville, and Savannah. Raleigh is especially well situated for 
all points in Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia, and the 
Eastern Shore of Maryland and Delaware. 

Raleigh is situated on the eastern border of the elevated Pied- 
mont belt, while a few miles to the east the broad, level lands of the 



St. Mary's Bulletin 15 

Atlantic Coast plain stretch out to the ocean. The city thus enjoys 
the double advantage of an elevation sufficient to insure a light, 
dry atmosphere, and perfect drainage, and propinquity to the ocean 
sufficiently close to temper very perceptibly the severity of the 
winter climate. The surrounding country is fertile and prosperous, 
affording an excellent market. 

CAMPUS, BUILDINGS, AND GENERAL 
EQUIPMENT. 

St. Mary's is situated on the highest elevation in the city, about 
a half-mile due west of the Capitol, surrounded by its twenty-four 
acre grove of oak and pine, with a frontage of fourteen hundred feet 
on one of the most beautiful residence streets. The site is all that 
can be desired for convenience, health and beauty. The campus 
contains almost a mile of walks and driveways, with tennis courts 
and basketball grounds for outdoor exercise. 

THE BUILDINGS. 

The buildings are twelve in number, conveniently grouped and 
connected by covered ways in such a way that a student is always 
protected from the weather. They are heated by steam, lighted by 
electricity, and abundantly provided with fire escapes, fire ex- 
tinguishers, and fire hose for fire protection. 

The central group of buildings is formed by the Main Building, 
remodeled in the summer of 1919 and now called Smedes Hall, and 
the two Wings, East and West, all three of brick, three and a half 
stories high. On the ground floor of Smedes Hall are the rooms of 
the Home Economics Department, and recitation rooms; on the 
first floor, the spacious parlor with its handsome portraits, and the 
School Room; on the second floor, conveniently located, are the 
office and rooms of the Lady Principal, and a large lounging room 
for students. The remainder of the building is devoted to rooms 
for students. East and West Wings have class rooms on the ground 
floor and students' rooms on the other floors. All students' rooms 



16 St. Marys Bulletin 

in all dormitory buildings are furnished with single beds, and have 
individual clothes closets. Trunks are stored in special trunk 
rooms. There are bath rooms on each floor. 

The East and West Rock buildings, of stone, are connected with 
the central group by covered ways. East Rock has the business 
offices, the Rector's office, the Post Office and the Teachers' Sitting 
Room on the ground floor, and students' rooms on the second floor. 
West Rock is given up entirely to rooms for students and teachers. 

Senior Hall, a two-story frame building of wood, contains rooms 
for teachers and for older students. 

Clement Hall, built from funds bequeathed by a former teacher, 
Miss Eleanor Clement, is a large brick building, forming one side 
of a proposed quadrangle back of Smedes Hall, with which it is con- 
nected by a covered way. On the ground floor is the Gymnasium 
50 by 90 feet; on the floor above, the spacious, airy dining hall, 
capable of seating comfortably three hundred people, with serving 
room, dietitian's office, kitchen, store rooms, etc., at the rear. 

The Art Building, a two-story brick building, of Gothic design, 
has the Library and class rooms on the ground floor, and the spa- 
cious, well-lighted Art Studio, 26 by 64 feet, a Music Studio, and 
the Science Laboratory on the second floor. 

The Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial Auditorium, immediately east 
of the Art Building, was in large part provided through a bequest 
in the will of Mrs. Mary Eliza Pittman, of Tarboro, and is in 
memory of her daughter, formerly a student of St. Mary's. 

The Piano Practice Rooms, twenty in number, are located along 
a covered way connecting the other buildings with the Art Build- 
ing. They add greatly to the effective work of the Music School, 
and are so located that the practising does not disturb the classes. 

The Chapel, designed by Upjohn, built in the early days of the 
School, and entirely rebuilt in 1905 through the efforts of the 
Alumnae, is cruciform in shape, and has over three hundred sittings, 
It is furnished with a pipe organ of two manuals and sixteen stops, 



SI. Mary s Bulletin 17 

a memorial gift of Mrs. Bennett Smedes. In it the services of the 
Church are held daily. 

The Infirmary, built in 1 903, is the general hospital for ordinary 
cases of sickness. It contains two large wards, a private ward, 
rooms for the Matron, pantry, and bathroom. The Annex, a sep- 
arate building, provides facilities for isolation in case of contagious 
disease. 

The steam heating system of the School is being entirely renovated 
in the summer of 1919, and the Boiler House and Laundry, a sep- 
arate building of several units apart from the other buildings, con- 
tains the boiler room, the hot water plant, and the well-equipped 
steam laundry. 

The Rectory of St. Mary's was built in 1900 upon a beautiful site 
on the west side of the campus, and is occupied by the Rector's 
family. The Cottage, home of the Business Manager's family, is 
located to the east of the other buildings to the rear of the Audi- 
torium. 

On the east side of the grove, entirely independent of the School, 
is the episcopal residence of the Diocese of North Carolina, "Ravens- 
croft." 

THE LIFE AT ST. MARY'S 

The aim of St. Mary's is to make the daily life of the students 
that of a well-regulated Christian household. The effort is to 
direct the physical, intellectual and moral development of the indi- 
vidual with all the care that love for young people and wisdom in 
controlling them render possible. 

The students are distributed, partly in accordance with age and 
classification, among the ten halls. Most of the rooms are rooms 
for two, but there are a few single rooms, and some rooms for three. 

Each Hall is presided over by a teacher who acts as Hall Mother. 
The Hall Mothers have special opportunities for correcting the 
faults and for training the character of the students under their 
charge, and these opportunities have been used with marked results. 



18 SI. Marys Bulletin 

The school hours are spent in recitation, in music practice, or in 
study in the Study Hall or Library, the more advanced students 
being allowed to study in their rooms. 

RECREATION PERIODS 

The latter part of the afternoon is free for recreation and exer- 
cise, and the students are encouraged to be as much as possible in 
the open air, and are also required to take some definite exercise 
daily. In addition to this exercise each student (not a Junior or 
Senior) is required to take definite class instruction and practice in 
Physical Training three times a week under the direction of the 
Director of Physical Training. A special division is provided for 
those who are delicate or require some special treatment. 

A half-hour of recreation is enjoyed by the students before the 
evening study period, when they gather in the roomy Parlor, with 
its old associations and fine collection of old paintings, and enjoy 
dancing and other social diversions. 

THE LIBRARY 

The Library, located in the Art Building, is the center of the 
literary life of the Schpol. It contains upward of twenty -five 
hundred volumes, including encyclopedias and reference works, 
and the leading current periodicals and papers. The Library is 
essentially a work room, and is open throughout the day, and to 
advanced students at night for special reading and reference work. 
The attention of the students is called frequently to the importance 
of making constant and careful use of its resources. 

CHAPEL SERVICES 

The Chapel is the soul of St. Mary's, and twice daily teachers 
and students gather there on a common footing. During the session 
the religious exercises are conducted very much as in any well- 
ordered congregation. As St. Mary's is distinctly a Church school, 



St. Mary's Bulletin 19 

all resident students are required to attend the daily services and also 
those on Sunday. Regular non-resident students are only required 
to attend the morning services, and only on the days when recita- 
tions are held. 

The systematic study of the Bible is a regular part of the school 
course, and in addition, on Sunday morning the resident students 
spend a half -hour in religious instruction. 

CARE OF HEALTH 

Whenever a student is so indisposed as to be unable to attend to 
her duties or to go to the dining hall, she is required to go to the 
Infirmary, where she is removed from the noise of the student life, 
and may receive special attention away from contact with the other 
students. The matron of the Infirmary has general care of the 
health of the students, and endeavors to win them by personal in- 
fluence to such habits of life as will prevent breakdowns, and help 
them overcome any tendencies to sickness. Even a slight indisposi- 
tion is taken in hand at the beginning, and thus its development 
into serious sickness is prevented. 

The employment of a School Physician enables the School to 
keep very close supervision over the health of the students. The 
ordinary attendance of the physician, and such small doses as 
students need from time to time, are included in the general charge. 
This arrangement leaves the School free to call in the Physician at 
any time, and thus in many cases to use preventive measures, when 
under other circumstances unwillingness to send for the doctor 
might cause delay and result in more serious illness. The general 
health of the School for many years past has been remarkable. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The spiritual and mental are undoubtedly of higher ultimate 
importance than the physical, but physical welfare is fundamentally 
of first importance. Every effort has therefore been made at St. 
Mary's to secure the best physicial development and the highest 



20 St. Mary's Bulletin 

grade of physical health. The very best teaching and the greatest 
efforts of the student will be of no avail if the physical health is 
poor, and, what is of more importance, the best education that one 
can obtain will be comparatively useless in later years, unless one 
has secured good physical development, good physical habits and a 
robust condition of general health. 

The Physical Director devotes herself entirely to Physical Train- 
ing, and is thoroughly prepared to get good results from this depart- 
ment of the school life. 

The Gymnasium is well equipped, and the Physical Exercises are 
arranged with a large scope, which is producing increasingly better 
results. The exercises, when possible, are taken out of doors, but 
some of them are conducted in the gymnasium for the purpose of 
exercise in special lines suited to each individual student. A careful 
record is kept of the measurements and strength in certain par- 
ticulars of each student, and reports indicating the changes in these 
matters are sent to the parents twice a year. This enables the 
parents to see what progress has been made, and also tends to in- 
crease the interest of the students themselves in the physical devel- 
opment which they ought to cultivate. 



THE SCHOOL WORK 

The School Year is divided into two terms of seventeen school 
weeks each. Each term is again divided into two "quarters." This 
division is made to assist in grading the progress of the student. 
Reports are mailed monthly. 

It is required that each student shall be present at the beginning 
of the session, and that her attendance shall be regular and punctual 
to the end. Sickness or other unavoidable cause is the only excuse 
accepted for non-attendance or tardiness. The amount of work to 
be done, and the fact that it must be done within the time planned, 
makes this rule necessary to the progress of the student in her 
course. 

Absence at the beginning of the session retards the proper work 
of the class, and is therefore unfair to the School as a whole. 

THE INTELLECTUAL TRAINING. 

Particular attention is given to the development of those intel- 
lectual habits that produce the maximum of efficiency. The 
student is expected to work independently, and gradually to 
strengthen the habit of ready, concentrated and sustained atten- 
tion in all her thinking processes. Clearness, facility and ease in 
the expression of thought, oral and written, are carefully cultivated. 
Every effort is made to develop the best mental habits through 
every detail of administration which bears upon the intellectual 
life, whether it be the recitation, the study hour, the individual 
help, or some other feature of the School management. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

An important element in the intellectual life of St. Mary's is the 
course of lectures which has been of much value to the students, 
and is intended to be a feature of the school life. In addition, 



22 St. Marys Bulletin 

there are given at stated times recitals by visiting artists, by the 
Musical Faculty, and by the students of the Music Department. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

While the regular duties at St. Mary's leave few idle moments 
for the students, they find time for membership in various organiza- 
tions, conducted by them under more or less direct supervision from 
the School, from which they derive much pleasure and profit. 
These organizations are intended to supplement the regular duties, 
and to lend help in the development of different sides of the student 
life. All qualified students are advised, as far as possible, to take 
an active part in them. 

THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

The missionary interests of the School, as a whole, are supple- 
mented by the work of the branches of the Auxiliary. The Senior 
branch is made up of members of the Faculty; the students make 
up eight Chapters of the Junior Auxiliary, each Chapter being 
directed by a teacher chosen by its members. These Chapters are 
known respectively as St. Anne's, St. Catherine's, St. Elizabeth's, 
St. Margaret's, St. Monica's, St. Agnes', Lucy Bratton, and Kate 
McKimmon. 

The work of the individual Chapters varies somewhat from year 
to year, but they jointly maintain regularly "The Aldert Smedes 
Scholarship" in the China Mission, "The Bennett Smedes Scholar- 
ship" in the Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, a Bible Woman in 
China, and other beneficent work. 

THE ALTAR GUILD 

The Altar Guild has charge of the altar and the decoration of the 
Chapel. 

THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The work of the two Literary Societies— the Sigma Lambda and 
the Epsilon Alpha Pi — which meet on Tuesday evenings, does much 



St. Mary's Bulletin 23 

to stimulate the intellectual life. The societies take their names 
from the Greek letters forming the initials of the Southern poets — 
Sidney Lanier and Edgar Allan Poe. The annual inter-society de- 
bates are a feature of the school life. Both resident and local 
students are eligible to membership in these societies. 

THE MUSE CLUB 

The students publish monthly a school magazine, The St. Mary's 
Muse, with the news of the School and its alumnae, and issue an- 
nually a year book, The Muse, with the photographs, illustrations, 
etc., that make it a valued souvenir. 

The Muse Club is organized for encouraging contributions to 
these publications, and supplementing the regular class work and 
the work of the literary societies, and holds its meetings weekly. 

THE SKETCH CLUB 

The Sketch Club is under the supervision of the Art Department. 
Frequent excursions are made during the pleasant fall and spring 
weather for the purpose of sketching from nature, etc. 

THE DRAMATIC CLUB 

The Dramatic Club is under the supervision of the Expression 
Department. Opportunity is afforded for simple general training 
that is frequently valuable in teaching poise, enunciation, and ex- 
pression, while care is taken not to allow any exaggeration. 

The members of the Club present annually one or more simple 
dramas. 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The Choir, the Chorus, and the Sight Singing Class afford stu- 
dents, both in and out of the Music Department, opportunity to 
develop their musical talent under very agreeable conditions. 



24 St. Mary's Bulletin 

ATHLETIC CLUBS 

In addition to the regular instruction given by a competent 
teacher, the students, with advisers from the Faculty, have two 
voluntary athletic associations, the object of which is to foster in- 
terest in out-of-door sports. These associations are known respec- 
tively as Sigma and Mu, from the initials of St. Mary's. 

The associations have walking clubs, tennis tournaments, basket- 
ball, volleyball, and captainball teams, and inter-association meets. 
Every girl has an opportunity to play on some team. Letters are 
awarded to the best players in tennis, basketball and volleyball. 




The Sketch Club in the Studio 















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Kill 


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•fl 


■pa 




> 

\ - 1 


m 


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-ImhEb 


> 



The Dramatic Club in "The Adventure of Lady Ursula' 




In the Gymnasium, Clement Hall 




r 



Tennis Flayers Gathered on Front Courts 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENTS 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

I. The Preparatory School; II. The College 

I. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

The Preparatory School covers the first two years (9th and 10th 
grades) of a High School of the highest standard. 

The two years of the Preparatory School and the first two years 
of the "College" cover the work of the best High Schools, and the 
courses are numbered for convenience A, B, C and D. (See pages 
41 et seq.) These four years, with courses properly chosen, should 
prepare the student for entrance into the most advanced standard 
colleges. 

The course in the Preparatory School is closely prescribed, and 
each student is expected to adhere to it. 

Admission to the Preparatory School is allowed provisionally on 
certificate without examination; but candidates are advised also 
to take such examinations as are necessary. 

At entrance every student is expected to select some definite 
course, and afterwards to keep to it. This course, when once 
agreed on, cannot be changed after entrance without the parent's 
consent. This requirement is not intended to hinder those who, 
coming to take a special course in Music, Art, Business, or Home 
Economics, desire to occupy their spare time profitably in some one 
or more of the courses of the College. 

II. THE "COLLEGE" 

The first two years of the present college course are intended to 
complete the work of a first-class high school, and the student is 
limited in well-defined lines and not permitted to specialize or take 
elective work except within narrow limits; in the last two years 



26 St. Mary's Bulletin 

the courses are conducted on college lines, and the student, under 
advice, is permitted in large measure to elect the lines of work best 
suited to her taste and ability. 

The course at St. Mary's is of a type that has been given by many 
of the higher institutions for the education of women in the South, 
and is the one suited to the need of the large majority of students. 
It is therefore designed to be complete in itself. 

At the same time those who desire to enter some higher institu- 
tion after graduation from St. Mary's can be prepared to do so. 
Such students should note carefully that to attain the desired end 
they must give notice of their intention and of the college to which 
they wish to go at the beginning of their Freshman year: their courses 
must be selected with a view to the requirements of the college to 
which they wish to go; and they should take the necessary examina- 
tions for entrance and advanced standing in that college each year 
as they are prepared in the various subjects. The course that 
might lead to the award of a diploma at St. Mary's might not cover 
the subjects necessary for entrance or for advanced standing in any 
given college of higher grade. 

Students are urged, wherever possible, to obtain certificates of 
work done, before the close of the school year. 



St. Marys Bulletin 27 

THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO THE FRESH- 
MAN CLASS OF ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 

In order to be admitted to the Freshman Class of the College the 
student must meet the requirements outlined below in English, 
History, Mathematics, Science and one foreign language — five sub- 
jects in all. If two foreign languages are offered Science may be 
omitted. 

A student admitted in four of the required subjects will be ad- 
mitted as a Conditioned Freshman. 

English and Literature. — A good working knowledge of the prin- 
ciples of English Grammar as set forth in such works as Buehler's 
Modern Grammar, with special attention to the analysis and con- 
struction of the English sentence. 

Knowledge of elementary Rhetoric and Composition as set forth 
in such works as Scott & Denney's Elementary English Composition, 
or Hitchcock's Exercises in English Composition. 

Candidates are expected to have had at least two years training 
in general composition (themes, letter writing, and dictation). 

Subjects for composition may be drawn from the following works, 
which the pupil is expected to have studied: Longfellow's Evange- 
line and Courtship of Miles Standish (or Tales of a Wayside Inn); 
selections from Irving's Sketch Book ( or Irving's Tales of a Traveler); 
Hawthorne's Twice Told Tales, Scott's hanhoe, and George Eliot's 
Silas Marner. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic complete, with special attention to the 
principles of percentage and interest. Elementary Algebra com- 
plete and Advanced Algebra through Quadratic Equations. 

History. — The History of the United States complete as laid 
down in a good high school text; the essential facts of English His- 
tory; the essential facts of Greek and Roman History. 

Latin. — A sound knowledge of the forms of the Latin noun, pro- 
noun and verb, and a knowledge of the elementary rules of syntax 



28 St. Marys Bulletin 

and composition as laid down in a standard first-year book and 
beginner's composition (such as Smith's Latin Lessons and Ben- 
nett's Latin Composition). The first four books of Caesar's Gallic 
War. 

French or Spanish. — A first-year course leading to the knowledge 
of the elements of the grammar and the ability to read simple prose. 

Science. — The essential facts of Physical Geography and Hygiene 
as laid down in such texts as Tarr's Physical Geography and Fisher's 
How to Live. 

ADMISSION 

(a) ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

Admission to the Freshman Class may be either by certificate or 
by examination, and it is preferred that the candidate both submit 
a Certificate of her past work and also take the examinations for 
entrance. 

Certificates alone are, however, accepted provisionally for entrance 
from all institutions known to St. Mary's to be of the proper 
standard. Such certificates should be full and explicit, and must 
state specifically that the work has been well done, and enumerate 
text-books, amounts covered, the length of recitation and time spent 
on each subject, the grades, etc. 

Certificates should, whenever possible, be secured before the close 
of the School year preceding entrance. 

(b) ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STUDIES 

In order to be admitted to work higher than that of the Freshman 
Class in any given subject, the student must present certificates of 
having completed satisfactorily the previous work in that subject, 
and must satisfy the head of the department of her ability to^do 
such advanced work. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 29 

CERTIFICATE CREDIT 

(a) FOR ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

Certificates when accepted are credited conditionally at their face 
value. The student is placed in the classes which her certificate 
gives her the right to enter, and is then expected to show her fitness 
for these classes by satisfactory work in them. If her work during 
the first month is unsatisfactory she may be required to enter the 
next lower class, or may be given further trial. If her work during 
the second month is satisfactory she is given regular standing in 
the class; if it is unsatisfactory she is required to enter the lower 
class. 

(b) FOR ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 
(1) CONDITIONAL CREDIT 

Though it is urged that students be examined for advanced 
classes and thus obtain full credit at once, conditional credit is 
given on the certificate of schools of entirely equivalent standard. 
For this conditional credit full credit in each subject is given when 
the student has successfully passed an examination in such subject, 
or, in certain subjects after she has obtained credit for advanced 
work in that subject. The amount of such credit can in no case 
exceed the amount of credit earned at St. Mary's. 

For example, a student entering English M (Junior English) by certificate 
would be given conditional credit for English C (Freshman English — 4 points) and 
English D (Sophomore English — 4 points). She receives four points credit for 
the successful completion of English M, and is then given full credit for four points 
of the conditional credit. The completion of English N (Senior English — 4 points) 
would give her full credit for the remaining four points of conditional credit, so that 
upon completion of English M she would be credited with 8 points in English, 
and upon completion of English N she would have 1 6 points to her credit. 

For conditional credit in History, Science and Algebra full credit 
can be obtained only by examination, since the work of the higher 
classes does not fully test the character of the work in the lower 
classes. 



30 St. Marys Bulletin 

(2) FULL CREDIT 

(a) Full credit is given at once on entrance for each subject when 
the student presents evidence by certificate of having successfully 
done the work required by St. Mary's in that subject and also passes 
an examination in the subject. 

(b) Full credit is given for conditional credit as mentioned in 
the preceding page. 

(c) While St. Mary's accepts certificates for entrance uncondi- 
tionally, it is obvious that credit for work in the "College" stands 
on a different footing from that for preparation for entrance, since 
such credit would count on the 60 points for which St. Mary's gives 
its diploma. It is impossible to maintain the value of the St. 
Mary's diploma unless all the work of the four years is tested by 
the School itself or by some standard authority generally recog- 
nized. The Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the 
Southern States seems to supply this authority. St. Mary's there- 
fore accepts for full credit for advanced standing certificates from 
the schools accredited by this Association which state that the candi- 
date has completed satisfactorily in accordance with the specified re- 
quirements of St. Mary's the required work in Foreign Language, 
Mathematics, History, English and Science. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR ENTRANCE 

Candidates for admission will, as a rule, be examined to determine 
their proper classification. 

Specimen examination questions in any subject will be furnished 
on request; and principals who are preparing students for St. 
Mary's will be furnished the regular examination papers at the 
regular times, in January and May, if desired. 

Certificates are urgently desired in all cases, whether the candi- 
date is to be examined or not. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 31 

REGULAR COURSE 

All students are advised to take a regular prescribed course and 
to keep to it; a changing about from one subject to another, with 
no definite aim in view, is unsatisfactory alike to student, parent 
and the School. Parents are urged to advise with the Rector as 
to a course for their daughters, and help in this matter is given by 
him or his representatives to the student throughout her course. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

Those who desire to take academic work while specializing in the 
Departments of Music, Art, Expression or Business are permitted 
to do so, and are assigned to such classes in the Academic Depart- 
ment as suit their purpose and preparation. The number of hours 
of academic work, along with the time spent on the special subjects, 
should be sufficient to keep the student well occupied. 

TERM EXAMINATIONS AND MARKING 

The School Year at St. Mary's is divided into two half-years (the 
Advent and Easter Terms), and each term is again sub-divided into 
two Quarters of two months each. Reports are sent out at the end 
of each month showing the marks obtained in each subject, and ex- 
aminations are held in all subjects at the end of each half-year. 

The mark for the term in each subject is obtained by adding the 
two quarter-marks and the examination mark, and dividing by 
three. Examinations are regarded by the School as of the highest 
importance, not only as a test, but as an essential part of education. 
At the same time it will be observed that it is possible to overcome 
a slight deficiency in the examination mark by a better mark for 
daily recitation, when the average is taken. 

The "passing mark" is 75%. The "honor mark" is 90%. 

CLASSIFICATION 

In order to graduate and receive the School diploma a student of 
the "College" must receive credit for 60 points of "college" work, 



32 St. Marys Bulletin 

of which 48 points are in specified subjects. All students of the 
College," whether expecting to graduate or not, are classified in 
one of the "College" classes according to the amount of their full 
credits for work in the "College" course. 

The classification is made on the following basis: 

A student to be ranked as a member of the "College" must have 
been admitted to the Freshman Class without more than one con- 
dition. 

If admitted with one condition, the student is ranked as a Con- 
ditioned Freshman, and no student is advanced to a higher class 
until all entrance conditions are passed off. 

If admitted without condition she is ranked as a Freshman. 
A student with 15 points of full credit is ranked as a Sophomore. 
A student with 30 points of full credit is ranked as a Junior. 

A student with 42 points of full credit is ranked as a Senior, pro- 
vided that she takes that year, with the approval of the School, 
sufficient points counting toward her graduation to make the 60 
points necessary and has passed off all conditions on work previous 
to the Junior Year, and also provided that no student can be ranked 
as a Senior or considered as a candidate for graduation in any year 
unless she has passed all examinations on previous subjects needed 
for graduation. 

A student entitled to be ranked in any way with a given class under the above 
conditions must also take work sufficient to give her the prospect of obtaining 
enough points during the year to entitle her to enter the next higher class the fol- 
lowing year. 

GRADUATION 

The course leading to graduation from the College is outlined later 
in stating the work of each year. The course is closely prescribed 
during the first two years (through the Sophomore year). In the 
last two years the student is allowed a broad choice of electives. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 33 

The requirements for graduation may be briefly summed up as 
follows: 

(1) The candidate must have been a student in the department during at least 
one entire school year. 

(2) The candidate must have earned at least 60 points, of which 48 points must 
be in the following subjects: 

English: 12 points. 
Mathematics: 5 points. 
History: 6 points. 
Science: 4 points. 
"Philosophy": 6 points. 

Foreign Languages (Latin, French, German or Spanish in any combina- 
tion) 15 points. 

(3) Not more than 20 points will be counted for class work in any one year; 
not more than 15 points will be counted altogether in any one subject (Latin, 
French, German and Spanish being considered as separate subjects), and not more 
than 12 points will be counted for technical work done in the Departments of 
Music, Art, Expression, or Home Economics. 

(4) The candidate must have made up satisfactorily any and all work, in which 
she may have been "conditioned" at least one year before the date at which she 
wishes to graduate. 

(5) The candidate must have made formal written announcement of her candi- 
dacy for graduation during the first quarter of the year in which the diploma is to 
be awarded; and her candidacy must have been then passed upon favorably by 
the Rector. 

(6) The candidate must have satisfactorily completed all "general courses" 
which may have been prescribed; must have maintained a satisfactory deport- 
ment; and must have borne herself in such a way as a student as would warrant 
the authorities in giving her the mark of the School's approval. 

THE AWARDS 

The St. Mary's Diploma is awarded a student who has success- 
fully completed the full academic course required for graduation, as 
indicated above. 

An Academic Certificate is awarded to students who receive a 
Certificate or Diploma in Music, Art or Expression, on the condi- 
tions laid down for graduation from the College, except that 



34 St. Mary's Bulletin 

(1) The minimum number of points of academic credit required is 35 points, 
instead of 60 points. 

(2) These points are counted for any strictly academic work in the College. 

(3) No technical or theoretical work in Music, Art or Expression will be cred- 
ited toward these 35 points. 

No honors will be awarded and no certificates of dismissal to 
other institutions will be given, until all bills have been satisfac- 
torily settled. 

COLLEGE ENTRANCE CERTIFICATE 

A Certificate stating that a student is considered to have done 
satisfactorily the work required for college entrance will be given 
to such students as shall have completed the proper units of work 
in a manner satisfactory to the authorities of St. Mary's. 

To receive this certificate the candidate must have been for two 
years at St. Mary's School, must have given one year's notice of 
her candidacy, and aside from her scholastic record must be con- 
sidered properly qualified in general by the Faculty. 

In order to receive this Certificate the candidate must also in 
each subject (1) pass each examination covered by the work re- 
quired; (2) have an average for each year of 80%; and (3) be 
recommended by the head of the department. 

The student must have completed \4}4 units of college entrance 
work, as follows: 

English: 3 units. 

Mathematics: 2% units. 

History: 2 units. 

Science: 1 unit. 

Latin: 4 units. 

French (or) German (or) Spanish: 2 units. 

AWARDS IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

For academic requirements for certificates or diplomas in Music, 
Art, Expression or Home Economics, see under those departments, 



St. Marys Bulletin 35 

but candidates must in each case, in addition to all technical re- 
quirements, have completed at least the "Minimum of Academic 
Work," stated on page 35. 

COMMENCEMENT HONORS 

Honors at graduation are based on the work of the last two 
years. 

The Valedictorian has the first honor; the Salutatorian has the 
second honor. The Essayist is chosen on the basis of the final 
essays submitted. 

THE HONOR ROLL 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members of the 
School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commencement. The 
requirements are: 

(1) The student must have been in attendance the entire session and have 
been absent from no duty at any time during the session without the full consent 
of the Rector, and without lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course of study or its 
equivalent, and must have carried this work to successful completion, taking all 
required examinations and obtaining a mark for the year in each subject of at least 
75 per cent. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good" (90 per cent.), or 
better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less than two demerits) in 
Deportment, in Industry, and in Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing in the affairs of 
her school life during the year. 

GENERAL STATEMENTS 
THE MINIMUM OF ACADEMIC WORK REQUIRED FOR CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for Certificates in the Music Department, the Art 
Department, the Expression Department, or in the Department of 
Home Economics, must have full credit for the following minimum 
of academic work. 



36 St. Mary's Bulletin 

(1) The A and B Courses in English, History, Mathematics, Science, and in 
either Latin or French or German or Spanish. 

(2) The C and D Courses in English. 

(3) Such other College Courses as will amount to "twelve points" of Academic 
credit. 

These "12 points" may be earned in English, History, Mathe- 
matics, Science, Latin, French, Spanish or "Philosophy." 

ACADEMIC CREDITS FOR WORK IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

The completion at St. Mary's of the theoretical and technical 
work in the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior or Senior classes in 
Music entitles the student to 3 points of academic credit for the 
work of each class, and a like credit is offered in the Departments 
of Art and Expression. (Only 3 points, however, may be obtained 
in any one year). 

One point of academic credit is given for the completion of 
Theory 3, 4 or 5. 

Students completing the work of Home Economics A I or A II 
receive 2 points of Academic credit. 

THE REGULAR ACADEMIC WORK 

THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL COURSE. 

For details in each subject, see page 41. 

The letter given with each subject is the name of the course. The number 
indicates the number of hours of weekly recitation. 

First Year Second Year 

English A, 4 English B, 4 

History A, 2 History B, 4 

Mathematics A, 2% Mathematics B, 4 

Science A, 2 Latin B, 4 

Latin A, 4 (or) 

French B, 2 

and 
Science B, 2 
All students are also required to take Bible Study, Drawing, Reading and 
Physical Culture. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 37 

THE "COLLEGE" WORK 

In the College work the letter given with each subject is the name of the course, 
and the number gives the number of points for the course, which ordinarily is the 
same as the number of hours of weekly recitations. 

It should be remembered that 60 points of credit are required for graduation 
from the College, and that 48 points of this 60 points are in required subjects, as 
follows: (See also page 33.) 

English: 12 points (that is, Courses C and D; and either M or N). 

History: 6 points. 

Mathematics: 5 points (that is, Course C). 

Science: 4 points. 

"Philosophy": 6 points. 

Foreign Languages: Latin, or French, or Spanish: 15 points (in any com- 
bination). 

The other 12 points are entirely elective. Music or Art may count 3 points 
each year or 1 2 points in all, or the 1 2 points may be elected from any C, D, M, or 
N Course in the "College." 

Pedagogy, (2) or Home Economics A I or A II, (2) may be elected and counted 
for credit. 

Art History, Theory of Music 3, 4 or 5 may be elected, with a credit of 1 point 
each. 

THE COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 

The completion of this course, under the conditions stated on page 34, will 
entitle the student to the College Entrance Certificate. 

FIRST YEAR ("A") SECOND YEAR ("B") 

Hours Unit Hours Unit 

English A 4 English B 4 1 

History B 4 1 History C 4 1 

Mathematics A 2}4 M Mathematics B 4 1 

Latin A 4 1 Latin B 4 1 

French B 2]/ 2 

(or) 
Spanish B 2J^ 

THIRD YEAR ("C") FOURTH YEAR ("D") 

Hours Unit 

English C 4 1 

Mathematics C .... 4 1 

Latin C 4 1 

French C 4"| 

(or) \ 1 

Spanish C 4 J 



English D 

Science D 


Hours 

4 
4 


Unit 
1 
1 


Latin D 


4 


1 


French D 


4) 




(or) 


«l 


I 



38 St. Mary's Bulletin 



THE "COLLEGE" COURSE 

FRESHMAN YEAR SOPHOMORE YEAR 

English C, 4 English D, 4 

Mathematics C, 5 Mathematics D, 3 

History C, 4 Science D, 4 

Latin C, 4 Latin D, 4 

(or) (or) 

French C, 4 French D, 4 

(or) (or) 

Spanish C, 4 Spanish D, 4 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

At least one foreign language is required. 

An hour of Bible Study and a period each of Spelling and Reading weekly is 
required. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as an additional subject for 
credit (3 points). 

Not less than 1 6 points nor more than 20 points should be taken. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

The foreign language elected in the Freshman Year should be continued, and 
e nough foreign language should be elected to count at least 4 points. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History and a period of Spelling 
weekly is required. 

The regular course in Music, Expression or Art may be taken as a subject for 
credit (3 points). 

JUNIOR YEAR SENIOR YEAR 

English M, 4 English N, 4 

Philosophy M, 2 Philosophy Na, 2 

History M, 2 Philosophy Nb, 2 

Latin M, 3 Latin N, 3 

French M, 2 French N, 2 

Mathematics M, 3 Mathematics N, 2 

History N, 2 

JUNIOR YEAR 

Enough work in foreign language should be elected to count at least 4 points. 
An hour each of Bible Study and Current History is required. 
The regular course in Music, Expression or Art may be taken as a subject for 
credit (3 points). 



St. Marys Bulletin 39 

SENIOR YEAR 

Enough foreign language must be taken to complete at least the 15 points re- 
quired for graduation. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History is required. 

English N is required unless 1 2 points have already been earned in English. 

History N is required unless 6 points have already been earned in History. 

The regular course in Music, Expression or Art may be taken as a subject for 
credit (3 points). 

GENERAL NOTES 

(1) The Theoretical courses in Music and Art may be counted as elective in 
any college class, and the technical work of the proper grade in either Music, Art 
or Elocution may be counted in any college class as an elective for three points. 
But only one subject may be so counted. 

(2) Failure in the Bible course for any year will deprive the student of one of 
the points gained in other subjects. 

GENERAL COURSES 

The theory of St. Mary's being that a well-rounded education 
results in a developing of the best type of Christian womanhood, 
certain general courses as outlined below have been prescribed for 
all students. 

ENGLISH 

An hour each week is devoted to training all students, except 
Juniors and Seniors, in the art of clear, forceful, intelligent reading, 
and in the practice of spelling and letter-writing. 

CURRENT HISTORY 

Students of the Senior, Junior and Sophomore years meet once a 
week for the discussion of current topics. This exercise is intended 
to lead to an intelligent knowledge of current events, and to em- 
phasize the importance of such knowledge in later life for intelligent 
conversation. 

BIBLE STUDY 

All students are required to take the prescribed course in Bible 
Study, which is given one hour a week. It is intended to afford 



40 St. Marys Bulletin 

a knowledge of the contents, history and literature of the English 
Bible, and with a view, in the case of the older students, to help 
them as Sunday School teachers. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

All students not excused on the ground of health are required to 
take the required exercises in physical training. 



THE COURSES IN DETAIL 

GENERAL STATEMENTS 

The courses are here lettered systematically. It is important to 
note and consider the letter of the course in determining credits or 
planning a student's work. 

"0" Courses are preliminary. Where a student has not had sufficient previous 
preparation for the regular courses, she will be required to take this "0" work before 
going on into "A." 

"A" Courses are the lowest regular courses, and are taken in the First Year of 
the Preparatory School. 

"B" Courses are taken in the Second Year of the Preparatory School. 

The "A" and "B" Courses in English, History, Mathematics and Science and 
one foreign language (or their equivalents) must have been finished satisfactorily 
by a student before she is eligible for admission to the College. 

"C" and "D" Courses are taken ordinarily in the Freshman and Sophomore 
years. In English, Mathematics, Latin, French and Spanish the "C" Course must 
be taken before the student can enter the "D" Course. 

"M" and "N" Courses are ordinarily taken in the Junior or Senior years. Stu- 
dents are not eligible to take these courses until they have finished the "C" and 
"D" Courses of the same subjects. (See special exceptions before each subject.) 

"X" Courses are special courses not counting toward graduation. 

HISTORY 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 6 points in History. 

Course A. — 4 half -hours a week throughout the year. (1) En- 
glish History. (2) American History. A constant aim of this 
course is to impress the student so thoroughly with the leading 
facts of English and American history that she will have a solid 
framework to be built upon later in her more advanced studies in 
History, English and Literature. 

Coman & Kendall, Short History of England; Thompson, History of the 
United States. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week throughout the year. Ancient His- 
tory. (1) First half-year: Greece; (2) Second half-year: Rome. 



42 St. Marys Bulletin 

The course in Ancient History makes a thorough study of the 
ancient world. The student is sufficiently drilled in map work to 
have a working knowledge of the ancient world; the influence of 
some of the great men is emphasized by papers based on outside 
reading, for instance: Plutarch's Lives. Selections from Homer 
are read in class. 

Breasted, Ancient Times; McKinley, Study Outline in Greek and Roman 
History. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week throughout the year (4 points). 
English History. In this course emphasis is laid on the develop- 
ment of constitutional government, particularly with its bearing 
on United States History. The McKinley Note Books are used 
for map work. From time to time papers are required on im- 
portant events and great men. 

Andrews, Short History of England. Reference work. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points). Amer- 
ican History. In U. S. History the text-book gives a clear and fair 
treatment of the causes leading to our war with Great Britain; to 
the War Between the States; and of present day questions, polit- 
ical, social and economic. 

Adams and Trent, History of the United States. 

Course M. — 2 hours a week. (2 points). Medieval History. In 
Medieval and Modern History the student is given a clear view of 
the development of feudalism; of monarchic states; of the history 
of the Christian Church; of the Reformation; of the growth of 
democracy, and of the great political, social and religious questions 
of the present day, with some special reference work in the library. 

West, Modern History; Robinson's Readings. 

Course N. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Modern History. A 
continuation of Course M. Same methods. 

Robinson and Beard, The Development of Modern Europe, Vol. II. Seigno- 
bos, Hayes and other reference works. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 43 



THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

AH students at entrance are required to stand a written test to determine 
general knowledge of written English. 

Courses 0, A, and B are Preparatory and the knowledge obtained in them 
is required before a student can enter a higher course. 

Candidates for graduation must take Courses C and D and at least 4 points 
from Courses M and N. 

Course 0. — (Preliminary.) 5 half -hours a week. (1) Grammar. 
Text-book: Emerson & Bender, Modern English (Book Two); 
Lessons in English Grammar. (2) Reading of myths (Guerber's 
stories), legends, other stories and poems; memorizing of short 
poems. 

Course A. — 4 hours a week. (1) Literature: the rapid reading 
of stories for main points of plot and character; word by word 
reading of several short poems for vocabulary, use and definition 
of words; memorizing of poetry. Reading list provided. (2) 
Composition: narratives, explanations, letters; subjects drawn 
chiefly from observation of processes and scenes, from work in 
and out of school and books; a few from imagination. 

Selections from Burroughs; Evangeline; Snowbound; Vision of Sir Launfal; 
Selections from Hawthorne and Bryant; Treasure Island; Lady of the Lake; 
Sohrab and Rustum; Ivanhoe (or) Kenilworth. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. (1) Literature: Method as in 
Course A, with more attention to structure, diction, and char- 
acters. Memorizing of short poems and passages. Reading list 
provided. (2) Composition. Subjects as in Course A, with addi- 
tion of more from books designed to give information and broader 
interests; letters; emphasis on neat, accurate written work and on 
explanation; study of structure of single paragraph. Chief features 
of explanation learned inductively in the main. Oral work: repro- 
duction of stories and poems; reports on individual work. 



44 St. Mary's Bulletin 

(3) Drill in fundamentals of grammar for good writing, exer- 
cises from time to time in analysis of sentences; punctuation 
more in detail. 

Scott and Denney, Elementary Composition; Silas Marner; As You Like It 
(or) Merchant of Venice (or) Julius Caesar; Lays of Ancient Rome; Roger de 
Coverley Papers; David Copperfield; selected poems and short stories. 



Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) (1) Rhetoric and 
Composition: business letters and social letters for various occa- 
sions; fundamental methods of forms of discourse; building of 
paragraphs; sentence manipulation, particularly clearness through 
connectives, correct placing of modifiers, unmistakable reference. 
Oral composition, some based on literature. Special drill in 
punctuation. (2) Literature: outline history of English literature 
use of text-books being subordinate to reading. A play of Shakes- 
peare, L' Allegro and // Penseroso, three Idylls of the King studied 
in detail; other books read more rapidly for substance. Reading 
list provided. 

Baldwin, Writing and Speaking; a practice book in composition; Long's or 
Halleck's History of English Literature; a Play of Shakespeare; Golden Treasury; 
Selected poems of Goldsmith, Gray, Burns, Coleridge, Byron; Idylls of the King; 
Tale of Two Cities; Carlyle's Essay on Burns (or) Macaulay's Life of Johnson. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Prerequisite: Course 
C. (1) Rhetoric and Composition: Putting into practice through- 
out term of fundamental principles involved in description, nar- 
ration, exposition, with especial emphasis on clearness and con- 
ciseness of style. Study of style closely correlated with literature. 
Oral composition. Review of English Grammar. (2) Literature: 
Study of Macbeth (or) Hamlet, Washington's Farewell Address 
and Webster's Bunker Hill Oration, Henry Esmond (or) Vanity 
Fair. Reading of essays and a novel. Outline History of English 
Literature continued from Course C in first term; outline His- 



St. Marys Bulletin 45 

tory of American Literature in second term. Reading list pro- 
vided. 

Baldwin, Writing and Speaking; Halleck's or Long's History of English 
Literature; Long's History of American Literature. Classics for study as in- 
dicated; Huxley, Selections from Lay Sermons; Emerson's Essays (selections); 
Poe's Poems and Tales. 

Course Ml. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Prerequisite: Course 
D. First Half-year. Romantic Movement. Special study of 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron. Second half-year 
Victorian Period. Special study of Tennyson, Browning, Arnold. 
Extensive reading from other poets and prose writers. Frequent 
written criticism. 

Century Book of Verse, Vol. II; Editions of the various poets. 

Course M2. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Prerequisite: Course 
D. Advanced composition. Writing of short stories, verse, 
essays, and a play. 

Course N1. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 points.) Pre- 
requisite: Course D. 

(a) — Prose writers of the Nineteenth Century; special study 
of Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman, Arnold. Readings from other 
writers. 

(b) — History of the English Novel, with study of representative 
novels. 

Raleigh: The English Novel. 

(a) and (b) are given in alternate years. 

Course N2. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points.) 
Shakespeare. Study of the development of the drama studied 
by means of lectures and readings. Reading in chronological 
order of most of Shakespeare's plays. 

The Arden Edition of Shakespeare's Works; Dowden's Shakespeare Primer. 



46 St. Marys Bulletin 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES. 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 15 points in foreign languages. 
FRENCH. 

Course B. — (Preliminary.) 5 half-hours a week. The study of 
the language begun. Careful drill in pronunciation. Reading, 
grammar, dictation, conversation. 

Fraser & Squair, Short French Grammar; Guerber, Contes et Legendes I; 
De La Bedolliere, Mere Michel; Malot, Sans Famille. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Prerequisite: French B. 
Elementary French I. Systematic study of the language. Gram- 
mar, reading, conversation. Careful drill in pronunciation. The 
rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular and 
the more common irregular verbs, the plural nouns, the inflection 
of adjectives, participles, and pronouns; the use of personal pro- 
nouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and conjunctions; the order 
of the words in the sentence, and the elementary rules of syntax. 
Abundant easy exercises, designed not only to fix in the memory the 
forms and principles of grammar, but also to cultivate readiness in 
the reproduction of natural forms of expression. The reading of 
from 100 to 175 duodecimo pages of graduated texts, with con- 
stant practice in translating into French easy variations of the sen- 
tences read (the teacher giving the English), and in reproducing 
from memory sentences previously read. Writing French from 
dictation. 

Fraser & Squair, Short French Grammar; Halevy, L'Abbe Constantin; Augier 
et Sandeau, Le Gendre de M. Poirier; La Brete, Mon Oncle et Mon Cure; or 
equivalents. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary French II. 
Continuation of previous work. The reading of from 250 to 400 
pages of easy modern prose in the form of stories, plays, or historical 
or biographical sketches. Constant practice, as in the previous 
year, in translating into French easy variations upon the texts read. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 47 

Frequent abstracts, sometimes oral and sometimes written, of por- 
tions of the text already read. Writing French from dictation. 
Continued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, with constant ap- 
plication in the construction of sentences. Mastery of the forms 
and use of pronouns, pronominal adjectives, of all but the rare 
irregular verb forms, and of the simpler uses of the conditional and 
subjunctive. 

Fraser & Squair, Abridged French Grammar; Labiche et Martin, Le Voyage 
de M. Perrichon; Lamartine, Jeanne d'Arc; Merimee, Colomba; or equivalents. 

Course M. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Intermediate French. 
At the end of this course the student should be able to read at sight 
ordinary French prose or simple poetry, to translate into French a 
connected passage of English based on the text read, and to answer 
questions involving a more thorough knowledge of syntax than is 
expected in the elementary course. The work comprises the read- 
ing of from 400 to 600 pages of French of ordinary difficulty, a por- 
tion in the dramatic form; constant practice in giving French para- 
phrases, abstracts or reproductions from memory of selected por- 
tions of the matter read; the study of a grammar of moderate 
completeness; writing from dictation. 

Fraser & Squair, Abridged French Grammar; Bazin, Les Oberle; Dumas, 
novels; Sandeau, Mile, de la Seigliere; de Tocqueville, Voyage en Amerique; or 
equivalents. 

Course N. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Advanced French. The 
rapid reading of from 300 to 500 pages of French poetry and drama, 
classical and modern, only difficult passages being explained in 
class; writing of short themes in French; study of syntax; history 
of French Literature; idioms. Sight reading without translation. 

Duval, Histoire de la literature francaise; Hugo, Hernani; Corneille's dramas; 
Rostand's Cyrano de Bergerac; Renan's Souvenirs d'enfance et de jeunesse; 
Moliere's plays; or equivalents. 

SPANISH 

Course B. — (Preliminary). 5 half-hours a week The study of 
the language begun. Careful drill in pronunciation. Grammar, 
dictation, reading, conversation. 

De Vitis, Spanish Grammar; De Vitis, Reader. 



48 St. Mary's Bulletin 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Prerequisite: Spanish 
B; Elementary Spanish I. Systematic study of the language. 
Grammar, reading, composition, conversation. Especial attention 
to letter-writing and business correspondence. 

De Vitis, Spanish Grammar completed; Le Sage's Gil Bias; Perez Galdos, 
Marianela. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary Spanish 
II. Continuation of Course C. Also a brief and practical study 
of every-day Spanish life based on Crawford's Spanish Com- 
position. 

Perez Galdoz, Dona Perfecta; Bequer, Short Stories; Jose Echegaray, El Gran 
Galeoto; or Equivalents. 

LATIN. 

Course A. — 4 hours a week. Elementary Latin I. Study of the 
simple inflectional forms; marking of quantities; reading aloud; 
translation of sentences from Latin into English, and from English 
into Latin; translation at hearing; easy connected Latin and 
English; composition and derivation of words; systematic study 
of syntax of cases and verb. 

Smith, Latin Lessons. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. Elementary Latin II. Caesar. Con- 
tinuation of preceding work; study of the structure of sentences in 
general, and particularly of the relative and conditional sentence, 
indirect discourse, and the subjunctive; sight translation, military 
antiquities. 

Bennett, Caesar (Books I-IV); Bennett, Latin Grammar; Bennett, New Latin 
Composition. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary Latin III. 
Cicero. Continued systematic study of grammar and composition; 



St. Marys Bulletin 49 

study of Roman political institutions; short passages memorized; 
prose and poetry at sight. 

Bennett, Cicero (four orations against Cataline, Archias, Manilian Law); Ben- 
nett, New Latin Composition. 

Course D. 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary Latin IV. 
Virgil. Continuation of preceding courses; prosody (accent, gen- 
eral versification, dactylic hexameter). 

Bennett's Virgil's &neid (Books I-VI); Bennett, Latin Grammar; Bennett, 
New Latin Composition. 

Course ML— 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate Latin I. 
The public and private life of the Romans as told in the Latin Liter- 
ature. Prose composition. Recitation; occasional explanatory 
lectures; parallel reading. (1) First half-year: The Roman His- 
torians; (2) Second half-year: The Roman Poets. 

(1) Melhuish, Cape, Livy (Books XXI, XXII); Allen, Tacitus' Germania; 
(2) Page, Horace's Odes (Books I, II); Baker, Horace's Satires and Epistles 
(selected); (1, 2) Gildersleeve-Lodge, Latin Composition; Peck and Arrow- 
smith, Roman Life in Prose and Verse; Wilkins, Roman Antiquities. 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Intermediate Latin II. 
Continuation of Course M. (1) First half-year: Roman Philoso- 
phy; (2) Second half-year: Roman Drama. 

(1) Shuckburgh, Cicero's de Senectute and de Amicitia; (2) Elmer, Terence's 
Phormio; (1,2) Gildersleeve-Lodge, Latin Composition; Peck and Arrowsmith, 
Roman Life in Prose and Verse. 



MATHEMATICS 

Candidates for graduation must have credit for at least Mathematics C. 

Course 0. — 5 half -hours a week. Arithmetic completed; final 
review with special drill on common and decimal fractions, practical 
measurements, percentage and its applications. Algebraic symbols 
and the use of the equation introduced in the solution of simple 
problems. Special drill in the use of signs and the four funda- 
mental operations of Algebra. 



50 St. Mary's Bulletin 

Course A. — 5 half-hours a week. Algebra. To Quadratic Equa- 
tions. Special products and factors; common divisors and mul- 
tiples; fractions, ratio, proportion, variation and inequalities; linear 
equations, both numerical and literal, containing one or more 
unknown quantities; special drill on problems; graphs and their 
use in linear equations and simple problems; square root and its 
applications; radicals and equations involving radicals; exponents, 
fractional and negative, and imaginaries. 

Wentworth-Smith, Academic Algebra. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. Algebra completed. Quick review of 
powers and roots; the theory of the quadratic equation, and equa- 
tions with one or more unknown quantities that can be solved by 
methods of the quadratic equation; the statement and solution of 
problems; graphs of the simpler equations of the second degree; 
cube root with applications; arithmetical and geometrical progres- 
sions with the theory; the binomial theorem with positive integral 
exponents. 

Wentworth-Smith Academic Algebra. 

Course X. — 5 half -hours a week. Complete Arithmetic. Commer- 
cial problems; review of common and decimal fractions; metric 
system; mental arithmetic; percentage and the applications; men- 
suration. Not counted for graduation. Intended especially for business 
pupils, and as a review for prospective teachers. 

Van Tuyl, Complete Business Arithmetic (or) Moore and Miner, Concise Busi- 
ness Arithmetic. 

Course C. — 5 hours a week. (5 points.) Prerequisite: Course B. 
(1) Plane Geometry. 4 hours a week. (4 points.) The usual theorems 
and constructions, including the general properties of plane recti- 
linear figures; the circle and the measurement of angles; similar 
polygons; areas; regular polygons and the measurement of the 
circle. The solution of numerous original exercises, including loci 



St. Mary's Bulletin 51 

problems. Application to the mensuration of lines and plane sur- 
faces. 

Wentworth-Smith, Plane Geometry (or) Hart & Feldman, Geometry. 

(2) Algebra from Quadratic Equations. 1 hour a week. (/ point.) 
Review for students who have had the Algebra but need a further 
drill, and for students intending to take college entrance examina- 
tions or the college entrance certificate. 

Wentworth-Smith, Academic Algebra. 

Course D.— 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Prerequisite: Course C. 
(1) Solid Geometry. First half-year. 

The usual theorems and constructions of good text-books, includ- 
ing the relations of planes and lines in space; the properties and 
measurements of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and cones; the sphere 
and the spherical triangle. The solution of numerous original ex- 
ercises, including loci problems. Applications to the mensuration 
of surfaces and solids. 

(2) Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Second half-year. Defini- 
tions and relations of the six trigonometric functions as ratios; 
circular measurements of angles. Proofs of principal formulas, in 
particular for the sine, cosine, and tangent of the sum and the differ- 
ence of two angles, of the double angle and the half angle, the 
product expressions for the sum or the difference of two sines or of 
two cosines, etc., the transformation of trigonometric expressions 
by means of these formulas. Solution of trigonometric equations 
of a simple character. Theory and use of logarithms (without the 
introduction of work involving infinite series). The solution of 
right and oblique triangles and practical applications, including the 
solution of right spherical triangles. 

Wentworth-Smith, Solid Geometry; (2) Wentworth-Smith, Trigonometry. 

Course M-l. — 3 hours. (3 points.) Analytical Geometry. This 
course includes the definitions, equations and simplest properties of 



!s School USr&ft 



52 St. Mary's Bulletin 

the straight line and conic sections. Particular attention is paid 
to plotting and to numerical problems. 

Smith & Gale, New Analytical Geometry (or) Riggs, Analytical Geometry. 

Course M-2. — 1 hour. (/ point.) Higher Algebra. The subjects 
included are: Functions and Theory of Limits, Derivatives, De- 
velopment of Functions in series, convergency of series, theory of 
logarithms, determinants, theory of equations (including Sturm's 
theorem). 

Merrill and Smith, Selected Topics in College Algebra. 

Course N. — 2 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course M. Calculus. 
(2 points.) Elementary course in the differential and integral 
calculus. 

Granville, Differential and Integral Calculus. 



NATURAL SCIENCE 

Candidates for graduation must take at St. Mary's 4 points in science. 

Course A. — 4 half-hours a week. General Elements of Science. 
A simple general treatment of the elementary facts of the various 
branches of natural science. 

Clark, General Science. 

Course B. — 4 half -hours a week. Physical Geography (a) The 
study of a standard text-book to gain a knowledge of the essential 
principles and of well-selected facts illustrating those principles. 
(b) Individual laboratory and field work comprising about 40 ex- 
ercises. 

Tarr, Principles of Physical Geography. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (3 hours recitation and demon- 
stration and one double-hour laboratory practice.) Elementary 



St. Marys Bulletin 53 

Biology. (2 points.) (a) A brief review of the general principles of 
animal physiology, (b) The general principles of plant life, and 
the natural history and classification of the plant groups. 

Individual laboratory work; stress laid upon accurate drawing 
and precise expressive description. 

Moore, Physiology of Man and the Lower Animals; Bailey, Botany. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week for the year. (3 hours recitation 
and demonstration, 1 double-hour laboratory.) Elementary Chem- 
istry. (4 points.) (a) Individual laboratory work, (b) Instruction 
by lecture-table demonstration, used as a basis for questioning upon 
the general principles involved in the student's laboratory investiga- 
tions, (c) The study of a standard text-book to the end that a 
student may gain a comprehensive and connected view of the most 
important facts and laws in elementary chemistry. 

Brownlee, First Principles of Chemistry and Laboratory Manual. 

"PHILOSOPHY" 

The following courses are intended for general all-round development and are 
required of all condidates for graduation. 

"Philosophy M-l." — 2 hours a week, first half-year. (/ point.) 
Civil Government. The leading facts in the development and actual 
working of our form of government. 

Fiske, Civil Government in the United States. 

"Philosophy M-2." — 2 hours a week, second half-year. (/ point.) 
Political Economy. The principles of the science made clear and 
interesting by their practical application to leading financial and 
industrial questions of the day. 

Ely and Wicker, Elementary Economics. 

"Philosophy N-1a." — 2 hours a week, first half-year. (/ point.) 
Ethics. A general outline of the foundation principles, especially as 
applied to the rules of right living. 

Janet, Elements of Morals. 



54 St. Mary's Bulletin 

"Philosophy N-U." — 2 hours a week, second half-year. (/ point.) 
Evidences. A study of the evidences for the truth of theistic belief 
discoverable by the light of nature independent of a special revela- 
tion; followed by a study of the evidences of Christian belief, 
demonstrating the truth of the New Testament narratives and the 
divine origin of Christianity. 

Fisher, Manual of Natural Theology; Fisher, Manual of Christian Evidences. 

"Philosophy N-2a."— 2 hours a week, first half-year. (/ point.) 
Psychology. A brief introduction to the subject, the text-book being 
supplemented by informal lectures and discussions. 

Halieck, Psychology. 

"Philosophy N-2b." — 2 hours a week, second half-year. (/ point.) 
Social Service. An elementary treatment, with discussions of prac- 
tical problems suggested. 

.Davis, The Field of Social Service. 



PEDAGOGY 

Pedagogy I. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Intended to prepare 
students to become teachers; it is also useful in making them better 
students. 

The chief aims of this course are to learn what methods in teach- 
ing have been proven the best, and to study the psychology of the 
child. With this is combined some practical instruction in Hygiene 
and Social Work. The instruction is partly by text-books and 
partly by informal lectures and discussions. Actual practice in 
teaching is also afforded, when desirable. 

Colgrove, The Teacher and the School; Hart, Educational Resources of Village 
and Rural Communities; Fisher and Fisk, How to Live; James, Talks to Teachers. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 55 

BIBLE STUDY 

Both resident and local students are required to take a one-hour 
course in Bible study. On account of the varying lengths of time 
spent at the School by different students, the variation of the 
classes which they enter, and the difference in knowledge of the 
subject shown by members of the same college class, it is difficult 
to arrange these courses in as systematic a way as might be desired. 

Students are therefore assigned to Bible classes partly on the 
ground of age and partly on the ground of the amount of work done 
and the length of time spent at the School. 

There are four divisions pursuing separate courses. These courses 
are designed to cover the Old and New Testament and the History 
of the Bible, in two years; and then to give a fuller knowledge of 
these subjects to those pursuing a longer course at the School. 

The instruction is partly by lectures, accompanied by the use of 
a uniform edition of the Bible (with references, dictionary, maps, 
etc.), as a text-book; and partly by Instruction Books. 

All resident students are also required to take a half-hour course 
in one of the Sunday classes. These courses are either on the 
Bible, or the Prayer Book, or Church History. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

GENERAL REMARKS 

Music is both an Art and a Science. As such, the study of music 
is strong to train the mind, to touch the heart, and to develop the 
love of the beautiful. The importance of this study is being more 
and more realized by the schools, and its power felt as an element 
of education. No pains are spared in preparing the best courses 
of study, methods of instruction and facilities of work, in this 
department. 

It is the aim of the Music Department of St. Mary's to give 
students such advantages in technical training, in interpretative 
study, and in study of musical form and structure, as will enable 
them not only to develop their own talent, but also to hear, to 
understand, and to appreciate the beautiful in all music. 

The department is well-equipped with a Miller, a Knabe, and a 
Steinway grand pianos, in addition to twenty-six other pianos and 
three claviers. The practice rooms are separate from the other 
buildings, and there is a beautiful Auditorium which seats six 
hundred and fifty people. 

Organ pupils are instructed on an excellent two-manual pipe 
organ, with twenty stops, and a pedal organ. A Kinetic electric 
blower adds greatly to the convenience of instruction and practice. 

Courses of study are offered in Piano, Voice, Organ and Violin. 

CONCERTS AND RECITALS 

For the purpose of acquiring confidence and becoming accustomed 
to appearing in public, all music pupils are required to meet once a 
fortnight in the Auditorium for an afternoon recital. All music 
pupils take part in these recitals, which are open only to members 
of the School. 

Public recitals are given by the advanced pupils during the 
second term of the school year. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 57 

A series of Faculty recitals is given during the year, and there are 
frequent opportunities for hearing music by artists, both at St. 
Mary's and in the city. 

THE CHOIR 

No part of the School music is regarded as of more importance 
than the singing in Chapel. The whole student body attends the 
services of the Chapel and takes part in the singing. The best 
voices are chosen for the choir, whir h leads in all the Chapel music, 
and often renders special selections, and for this purpose meets 
once a week for special practice. The students in this way become 
familiar with chanting, with the full choral service, and with the 
best church music. Membership in the choir is voluntary, but 
students admitted to the choir are required to attend the weekly 
rehearsal. 

A short rehearsal of the whole School is conducted after the ser- 
vice in the Chapel on Saturday evenings. 

THE CHORUS CLASS 

The Chorus Class is not confined to the music students, but is 
open to all students of the School, without charge. This training 
is of inestimable value, as it gives practice in sight reading, and 
makes the student acquainted with the best choral works of the 
masters — an education in itself. 

Care is taken not to strain the voices, and attention is paid to 
tone color and interpretation. The beauty and effect of chorus 
singing is in the blending of the voices, and to sing in chorus it is 
not necessary to have a good solo voice. 

From the members of the Chorus Class voices are selected by the 
Chorus Conductor for special work. Membership in the Chorus 
Class is voluntary; but parents are urged to require this work from 
their daughters, if they are deemed fit for it by the Conductor. 
When, however, a student is enrolled, attendance at rehearsals is 



58 St. Mary's Bulletin 

compulsory, until the student is excused by the Rector at the re- 
quest of the parent. 

RELATION TO THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 

Studies in the Music Department may be pursued in connection 
with full academic work, or may be the main pursuit of the student. 

Study in the Music Department is counted to a certain extent 
toward the academic classification of regular students of the Aca- 
demic Department. The theoretical studies count the same as 
Academic studies. The technical work is given Academic credit 
in accordance with certain definite rules. (See page 36.) Not 
more than three points credit in Music in one year, nor more than 
twelve points in all, can be counted toward graduation from the 
" College." 

Pupils specializing in music are, as a rule, expected to take 
academic work along with their musical studies. This is in ac- 
cordance with the prevailing modern ideals in professional studies 
and the pursuit of special branches which require some general edu- 
cation in addition to the acquirements of a specialist. Students 
from the city may take lessons in music only. Certificates in Music 
are awarded only to students who have completed the required 
minimum of academic work. (See page 35.) 

CLASSIFICATION IN MUSIC 

Students entering the department are examined by the Director 
and assigned to a teacher. 

Thereafter, at the end of the first half-year (or earlier if advisa- 
ble), the student's classification in music is decided, and she is 
enrolled in the proper class. This determines her degree of advance- 
ment in her musical studies. 

The examinations for promotion are held semi-annually. The 
marks in music indicate the quality of work, not the quantity. 
Promotion is decided by an examination, which shows both that 



St. Mary's Bulletin 59 

the required amount of work has been done and that it has been 
well done. 

Candidates for promotion or awards are required to perform cer- 
tain stipulated programs before the Faculty of Music. 

To be classified in a given class in Music the student must have 
completed the entire work indicated below for the previous class or 
classes, and must take the whole of the work laid down for the class 
she wishes to enter. Technical work is not sufficient for enrollment 
in a given class without the theoretical work. 

Classification in music is entirely distinct from academic classifi- 
cation; but the satisfactory accomplishment of the full work of 
the Freshman or higher classes in music is counted toward academic 
graduation, provided the student is at that time a member of the 
College. 

CLASSES IN MUSIC. 

(It should be carefully noted thai the names of the classes, as here 
used, are of musical standing only, and do not refer to the academic 
class of which the same student may be a member.) 

The regular course is designed to cover a period of four years 
from the time of entering the Freshman class, but the thoroughness 
of the work is considered of far more importance than the rate of 
advance. It may require two or more years to complete the work 
of the Preparatory class. 

Preparatory. — Course f in Theory and Course I in Piano, or in 
Voice, or in Violin. 

Freshman. — Course 2 in Theory and Course 2 in Piano, or in Organ* 
or in Voice, or in Violin. 

Sophomore. — Course 3 in Theory and Course 3 in Piano, or in 
Organ, or in Voice, or in Violin. 

Junior. — Course 4 in Theory and Course 4 in Piano, or in Organ, or 
in Voice, or in Violin. 



60 St. Mary's Bulletin 

Senior. — Course 5 in Theory and Course 5 in Piano, or in Organ, or 
in Voice, or in Violin. 

AWARDS 

The certificate of the Department is awarded under the following 
conditions: 

1 . The candidate must have completed the work, theoretical and technical, of 
the Senior Class in the Music Department. (See above). 

2. The candidate must have been for at least two years a student of the depart- 
ment. 

3. The candidate must have finished the technical work required, and have 
passed a satisfactory examination thereon, at least one-half year before the certifi- 
cate recital which she must give at the end of the year. 

4. The candidates must have completed the required minimum of Academic 
Work. (See page 35). 

A Teacher s Certificate is given on the completion of the theoretical 
and technical courses in Piano, Voice, Organ, or Violin, without 
public recital, for which is substituted work in pedagogy and one 
year of practical teaching under supervision. Work in this line is 
intended to conform as far as possible to the State requirements for 
a Music Teacher's Certificate. For further information, see page 65. 

The Diploma, the highest honor in the Music Department, is 
awarded to a student who has already received the Certificate, and 
who thereafter pursues advanced work in technique and interpreta- 
tion for at least one year at the School. 

ACADEMIC CREDIT FOR MUSIC COURSES 

Theory 3 or 4 or 5 receive academic credit of / point each. 

The foregoing studies are credited, like any academic subject, 
only when the student has attained an average of 75 per cent on the 
recitations and examinations of the year. 

The technical work in Music is also credited for academic classifi- 
cation, as follows: 



St. Mary's Bulletin 61 

The completion at the School of the technical work in the Fresh- 
man, Sophomore, Junior, or Senior classes in Music will entitle the 
student to 3 points of academic credit for the work of each class 
thus completed under the following conditions: 

(1) Not more than three points may be earned in any one year in Piano, 
Voice, Violin or Organ — whether one or more of these subjects is studied. 

(2) Not more than 12 points (one-fifth of the total amount required for gradu- 
ation from the college) may be earned in all. 

(3) In order to be entitled to credit the pupil must be a member of the "College" 
(Preparatory pupils may not count Music toward subsequent academic graduation). 

(4) In order to be entitled to credit for the technical work of a given class in 
music, the student must also have completed satisfactorily the theoretical work of 
that class. 

Promotion to a given course in technical work is evidence of the 
satisfactory completion of the work of the previous course. 

THE COURSES 

The courses in Music are divided into Theoretical (including for 
convenience History of Music) and Technical. 

THEORETICAL COURSES. 

(One hour each per week. Academic credit: 1 point.) 
Theory 1. Evans' Elements of Music used in the Preparatory Department of 

Peabody Conservatory. Dictation. Lessons in rhythm. 
Theory 2. Solfeggio. 

Theory 3. Chadwick's Lessons in Harmony with Keyboard Harmony. 
Theory 4. Harmony continued. Elson's Theory of Music. 
Theory 5. Elson's Theory continued. History of Music, with lectures and illus- 
trations. 

TECHNICAL COURSES 

In general, each course corresponds to a year's work for a pupil 
with musical taste. But even faithful work for some pupils may 
require more than a year for promotion. 



62 St. Mary's Bulletin 

PIANO. 

Course 1. — All major scales in chromatic order, hands together, in sixteenth 
notes, metronome 92 to a quarter note. Harmonic and melodic minor 
scales, hands separate, in eighth notes, metronome 100 to a quarter note. 
Major arpeggios, hands separate, in sixteenth notes, metronome 80 to a 
quarter note. Preparatory exercises leading to octave playing. 
Studies: Duvernoy op. 176; Kohler op. 157, and op. 242; Heller op. 47; 
Burgmuller op. 100. Easier sonatinas by Lichner, Clementi, Kuhlau, etc. 
Read at sight a first grade piece. 

Course 2. Major scales, hands together, in sixteenth notes, metronome 1 1 2 to a 
quarter note. Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands separate, in six- 
teenth notes, metronome 100 to a quarter note; hands together, metronome 
80 to a quarter note. Major and minor arpeggios, hands separate, in six- 
teenth notes, metronome 80 to a quarter note. Any minor scale played 
staccato, legato, crescendo, and dimuendo without metronome. Tempo 
moderato. Major octave scales, hands separate, without metronome. 
Studies: Duvernoy op. 120; Czerny op. 636; Le Couppey op. 20; Heller 
op. 46; Bach Little Preludes and Fugues; Turner Octaves op. 28; Vogt 
Octaves. Sonatinas, Kuhlau, Diabelli, etc. Read at sight a second grade 
piece. 

Course 3. Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands together, in sixteenth notes, 
metronome 112 to a quarter note. Major and minor arpeggios, hands 
together, in sixteenth notes, metronome 92 to a quarter note. Major scales 
in octaves in chromatic order, hands separate, in eighth notes, metronome 
100 to a quarter note. Three major scales in thirds, sixths, tenths, and con- 
trary motion, in sixteenth notes, metronome 1 00 to a quarter note. 
Studies: Czerny op. 299; Bernesop. 61; Krause op. 2; Heller op. 45; Bach 
Two-Part Inventions. Easier sonatas of Clementi, Mozart, Haydn, 
Beethoven. Read at sight a third grade piece. 

Course 4. Minor scales in sixteenth notes, hands together, metronome 120 to a 
quarter note. Major and minor arpeggios, hands together, in sixteenth 
notes, metronome 116 to a quarter note. Three melodic and harmonic 
minor scales in thirds, sixths, tenths, and contrary motion, in sixteenth 
notes, metronome 100 to a quarter note. Major scales in octaves, hands 
separate, in sixteenth notes, metronome 72 to a quarter note. Scale of C in 
double thirds, hands separate, in eighth notes, metronome 100 to a quarter 
note. 
Studies: Bach French Suites, Three-Part Inventions. Cramer Etudes, 
Clementi "Gradus ad Parnassum." A sonata — Beethoven, Mozart or 
Haydn — and a modern composition to be mastered technically and inter- 
preted by the student, without assistance. Read at sight a third grade piece 
or play a simple accompaniment. 



St. Marys Bulletin 63 

Course 5. Six major scales and six minor scales (three harmonic and three melodic) 
in thirds, sixths, and tenths, and in contrary motion, hands together in six- 
teenth notes, metronome 100 to a quarter note. Dominant and diminished 
sevenths, hands together, in sixteenth notes, metronome 116 to a quarter 
note. All major scales in double thirds, hands separate, in sixteenth notes, 
metronome 72 to a quarter note. Major octave scale in sixteenth 
notes* metronome 72 to a quarter note. 
Studies: Bach Well-Tempered Clavichord and advance studies in interpreta- 
tion. Public recital. 

FOR DIPLOMA 

Course 6. Preludes and Fugues from Bach's Well-Tempered Clavichord, 1 and 2. 
Concert studies, Moscheles, Moszkowski, and Joseffy. The student must 
have a repertoire including works of Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Chopin, 
Mendelssohn, and of modern composers, MacDowell and others. Public 
recital. 

The Progressive Series of Piano Lessons is also taught, and 
Miss Dowd gives the examinations for teachers' certificates, being 
authorized to do so by the Art Publication Society. 

COMPOSITION CLASS 

Pupils of advanced grades may join a voluntary class in composi- 
tion, in which they are taught to express correctly their original 
musical ideas. 

VOICE 

Course I. Breath control, sight singing and tone development and music appre- 
ciation. Scales and arpeggios sung slowly. Sieber, Eight-measure Studies. 
Nava, Elements of Vocalization. S. Marchese, op. 15. Bona, Rhythmical 
Articulation. Simple songs and ballads. 

Course 2. Vocalization, poise, sight singing. Music appreciation. Studies by 
Lamperti; Concone, Vocalises; Bordogni, Easy Vocalises; S. Marchese, 
op. 15; and Vaccai. Modern songs and easy classics. 

Course 3. Vocalizations. Sight singing. Music appreciation. Studies by Maz- 
zoni, Marchesi, Concone, Lamperti. Panofka, op. 81. Vaccai. Shakespeare^ 
Art of Singing. Sight singing. Ballads and simple old French and Italian 
s ongs. 



64 St. Marys Bulletin 

Course 4. Vocalization. Sight singing. Music appreciation. Studies by Vannini, 
Otto Vocalizzi. Panofka, op. 81. Spicker, Masterpieces of vocalization, 
Books 1 and 2, Manuel Garcia, Studies. Sight singing. Arias from the old 
and modern Operas. 

Course 5. Vocalizations, Sight Singing and Embellishment and studies in inter- 
pretation. Studies either in Dramatic, Colorature, or Lyric. Sieber, op. 
129-130. Vannini. Spicker, Master Studies, Books 3 and 4. Panofka, op. 
81. Classic songs and arias. Oratorio and opera. Public recital. 

For examination the student must sing Scales, Roulades and 
Arpeggios rapidly. She must have a repertoire of classic and 
modern songs, and be able to sing Arias, too, from any of the 
operas and oratorios studied. 

ORGAN. 

Practical instruction is given from the first rudiments to the 
highest difficulties of the instrument, both in its use as an accom- 
paniment to the different styles of Church music, and in the various 
methods of the employment of the organ as a solo instrument. 

Opportunity is given to acquire confidence and experience by 
practice in accompanying the services of the Chapel, beginning 
with the easier work at the daily services of the School and going on 
through the accompaniment of anthems and more elaborate ser- 
vices on Sunday. 

Course I. — The organ pupil must have enough work in piano to enable her to enter 
the Freshman Class in piano. This constitutes Preparatory work for the 
organ course. 

Course II. — Pedal Studies by Horner, Books 1 and 2. Pedal scales and arpeggios, 
slowly. Studies by Anton Andree. Two and three part playing, hands 
separate. Hymn playing. 

Course III. — Bach's Pedal Studies. Easy Preludes and Fugues by Merkel, Batiste 
and Bach. Service playing. Easy transposition and Modulation and easy 
Improvisation. 

Course IV. — Sight reading. Bach's Preludes and Fugues. Sonatas, Symphonies 
and Overtures by Widor, Guilmant, Mendelssohn. Woltsenholme, Service 
and Chorale playing, Transposition, Modulation and Improvisation. 



Si. Mary's Bulletin 65 

Course V. — Sight reading, Bach's Preludes and Fugues, Carl's Master Studies, 
Service and Chorale playing. Transposition, Modulation and Improvisa- 
tion. The following work must be done for examination: Play a prepared 
piece. Read at sight a selected piece (on two manuals and pedal). Modu- 
late to any key called for (4 tests). Transpose a selected Hymn up or down 
one tone (at sight). Paper work in Hymnology, Musical Form, Organ con- 
struction and tuning, Choir training, Musical Dictation and General ques- 
tions in Musical knowledge. 

An advanced piano student might do the work of two of the 
above courses in one year. 

VIOLIN 

The course in Violin is indicated in the summary given below. 
Pupils of the department, if sufficiently advanced, are required to 
take part in the Orchestra, which is included in the regular work 
of the department. 

Course 1. — Exercises and studies by Heming, David (Part I), Dancla, Hofman, op. 
25, Wohlfahrt op. 45. Easy solos by Hauser, Sitt, Dancla, Papini, etc. 

Course 2. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part II), Sevcik op. 6, 
Kayser op. 37. Solos adapted to the needs of students. 

Course 3. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part II), Sevcik op. 6, op. 8, 
op. 9, Dont, Kayser op. 20, Kreutzer. Solos by DeBeriot, Dancla, etc. 
Modern composers. 

Course 4. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, Sevcik, Rode, Kreutzer. Sonatas, 
Concertos by Viotti, Spohr, DeBeriot, etc. 

Course 5. — Exercises and studies by Sevcik, Mazas, Fiorillio. Sonatas, Concertos. 
Public recital. 

A knowledge of piano, sufficient to play second grade pieces at 
least, is required in the case of pupils in the last two courses. 

NORMAL WORK IN PIANO 

Steps have been taken throughout the country to see that properly 
qualified teachers shall have certificates from some duly authorized 



66 St. Mary's Bulletin 

authority. The qualified teacher is entitled to such a certificate, 
and the employer has a right to require such evidence that the 
teacher is qualified. This is as true of teachers of Music as of any 
others. Plans are being worked out to arrange some central board 
of certification for music teachers. To provide for the preparation 
of those who wish to take the examinations of such a board the 
School has arranged a special course with special fees under a 
special instructor for Normal work in Piano. The work is adapted 
to the needs of each student, and to the requirements of the examin- 
ing board when fully arranged. Miss Martha A. Dowd, a teacher 
of long and varied experience, who has made a special study of the 
subject under Mr. Edwin Farmer, of New York, and Mr. Clarence 
G. Hamilton, of Wellesley College, has charge of such students. 



ART DEPARTMENT 

The aim of the Art Department is to afford an opportunity for 
serious study, and to give a thorough Art education, which will 
form the basis of further study in the advanced schools of this 
country and abroad; also, to enable pupils who complete the full 
course to become satisfactory teachers. All work is done from 
nature. 

The Studio is open daily during school hours. Candidates for a 
certificate in the Art Department must pass satisfactorily the course 
in Drawing, Painting, and the History of Art, and must also satisfy 
the academic requirements for a certificate, as stated on page 35. 

The technical work in the Art Course, leading to a certificate, 
ordinarily requires a period of three years for completion. About 
half of this time is required for Drawing, and the second half for 
Painting. 

I. Drawing. — The student is first instructed in the free-hand 
drawing of geometric solids, whereby she is taught the fundamentals 
of good drawing, the art of measuring correctly, and the drawing of 
straight and curved lines. This work is exceedingly important. 

Next the student is taught drawing from still-life, with shading; 
the drawing of plants; of casts; original designs — conventional 
and applied — in black and white, and in color; and pencil sketches 
from nature. 

After this comes charcoal drawings; or shading in pen and ink; 
or wash-drawings in monochrome, as in magazine illustrating. 

II. Painting. — This includes work in oil and in water color. 

The student is required to paint two large still-life groups; two 
large landscapes; two flower studies, one a copy and one from 
nature; several sketches from nature, and two original designs. 

III. History of Art. — This study includes the history of Archi- 
tecture, Sculpture, and Painting. This course is important, and is 
required of all students in the regular art course. 



68 St. Mary's Bulletin 

Special Courses. — Pupils who do not wish to take the regular 
course may take any of the above courses or of the following special 
courses: 

1. Flower Painting. — Special attention is given to flower painting in water 
color. 

2. Still-life Painting. — This work is preparatory to more advanced work in the 
flower painting and life classes. Either oil or water color may be used as a medium. 

3. China Painting. 

4. Life Class. — A living model is provided from which the students may draw 
and paint. 

5. — Sketch Club. — This club is formed of students who take turn in posing in 
costume. The same model poses only once. During the spring and fall months 
outdoor sketching from nature is done. 

6. Advanced Antique. — All classes are graded according to this work. Drawing 
from Greek antiques in charcoal is required of all pupils taking the full course. 

7. Composition Class. — This class is one of the most important in the depart- 
ment, and makes for the development of the creative and imaginative faculties. 
Subjects are given and "pictures" must be painted and submitted for criticism on 
certain days in the term. 

8. Design Class. — This work is planned according to the principles originated 
and applied by Arthur W. Dow, and is a combination of the Occidental and Oriental 
principles. A close study of nature and an original imaginative use of her forms in 
design is the keynote of this method. 

9. Architectural and Mechanical Drawing. — To supply the demand for women 
draftsmen in architect's offices, a special course in Architectural and Mechanical 
Drawing is offered by the School. The course begins with geometrical figures, pro- 
jections of objects, and leads up gradually to the highest forms of architectural 
work. 

10. Stenciling. — This class offers an opportunity for applying a knowledge of 
designing. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

The Business Department of St. Mary's was established in 1897 
to meet the growing demand for instruction in the commercial 
branches, which are more and more affording women a means of 
livelihood. The course is planned to accomplish this purpose as 
nearly as possible 

The curriculum embraces thorough instruction in Stenography, 
Typewriting, Manifolding, etc.; Bookkeeping, Arithmetic, Pen- 
manship, and English. 

Students taking, as is advised, the course in connection with 
academic work, would ordinarily complete the Business Course in 
one school year. 

Students may take either the full course or any part of it. 

Graduates of the Department have been universally successful 
in their practical business engagements, and are the best recom- 
mendation for the work of the department. 

REQUIREMENTS. 

In order to be well prepared to take the course to advantage, 
students, before entering the Business Department, should have 
satisfactorily completed the work of the Preparatory School or its 
equivalent. 

Attention is called to the fact that the services of a stenographer 
and her ability to command a high salary depend not so much on 
her technical skill in actual typewriting and stenography, to which 
much may be added by practice afterwards, but to the preliminary 
mental equipment with which she undertakes her technical prep- 
aration. 

AWARDS 

The Business Certificate is awarded those students who complete 
the work of the full course, including all the work required for cer- 
tificates in Stenography, Typewriting and Bookkeeping. 



70 SI. Mary's Bulletin 

The Diploma of the department is reserved for those students 
who, in addition to completing the work required for the Business 
Certificate, have the mental equipment to do unusually good work 
in their profession, and who have demonstrated their fitness for 
such work by actual practice. 

Certificates in Stenography, Typewriting or Bookkeeping are 
awarded students who have completed the respective requirements 
stated below. 

COURSES 

In Stenography, the Isaac Pitman System of Shorthand is used. 
This is the standard system, is easily acquired, and meets all the 
demands of the amanuensis and the reporter. 

The work of the courses and the requirements for Certificates 
are as follows: 

Stenography. — The texts used are Isaac Pitman's Short Course in Shorthand, 
Business Correspondence in Shorthand Nos. 1 and 2, and Book of Phrases and 
Contractions. In connection with the texts, the following books from the Isaac 
Pitman shorthand library are used in class for reading and dictation purposes: 
Vicar of Wakefield, Irving's Tales and Sketches, Macaulay's Warren Hastings, 
Dickens' Haunted Man, Leaves from the Note Book of Thomas Allen Reed, etc. 

The pupils are taught Manifolding, Composition, Punctuation, Spelling, Business 
Forms, Correspondence and Reporting. 

To receive the Certificate, the student must have completed the required work 
in the foregoing; must have attained a speed of at least 80 words a minute from 
dictation; and must have completed the required work in English in the Academic 
Department. 

A certificate in Stenography will not be given unless the student has also taken 
the course in Typewriting. 

Typewriting. — The touch system is used, and to obtain the Certificate the 
student must have attained a speed of 50 words a minute from dictation; 40 words 
from printed matter; and 30 words from stenographic notes; and must have com- 
pleted the required work in English. 

Bookkeeping. — Miner's Bookkeeping (Introductory Course) is used as a 
text. As a student advances, the instruction becomes thoroughly practical, a regu- 
lar set of books is opened, and the routine of a well-ordered business house thoroughly 
investigated and practically pursued. The object is to prepare the student to fill a 
position immediately after graduation from the School. 

For the Certificate, in addition to the technical work in Bookkeeping, the course 
in Commercial Arithmetic (Math. X) must be completed. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

The faculty of expressing oneself clearly and effectively is valuable 
in every calling. A well-trained voice and clear enunciation are 
equally desirable in ordinary conversation and in public speaking. 
The purpose of the study of expression is to attain these ends; to 
broaden the power of individual thinking, to awaken a love and 
appreciation of literature by the lucid interpretation of it to others, 
and to train teachers. 

REGULAR REQUIRED WORK 

Students of the Freshman and Upper Preparatory classes are re- 
quired to take a period of expression each week in connection with 
their regular work, and for this there is no extra charge. This 
course deals with fundamental reading. Particular attention is 
paid to the standing position, articulation, pronunciation, projec- 
tion, breath control, and the correction of mannerisms, leading the 
student to read intelligently so as to give pleasure to the listener. 

SPECIAL WORK 

The special courses, which should be taken by students in con- 
nection with work in the academic department, and for which the 
charge is extra, are (1) Class Expression and (2) Private Expres- 
sion. 

CLASS EXPRESSION 

In this class the number is limited, and each student receives 
careful individual attention. The course is so arranged as to 
afford the student the opportunity to appear in informal recitals 
from time to time, thereby gaining in confidence and poise. 

PRIVATE EXPRESSION 

The course of the private pupil is more inclusive. A thorough 
training is given in all the principles of expression. During the 



72 St. Mary's Bulletin 

year each student appears in public recitals, for which she is taught 
to interpret the best literature. 

Private pupils are admitted to the Dramatic Club, giving them 
the advantage of the study and presentation of at least two good 
plays during the year. 

The academic credit for this course is 3 points for each year. 

AWARDS 

As in other departments, the Certificate is only awarded if the 
student has completed the required Minimum of Academic Work in 
the College. (See page 35.) 

The regular course of the department is planned to extend over 
four years, leading to the Diploma. 

The Certificate is awarded on the completion of the work of the 
Third Year and the giving of a public recital. 

Students who have practically completed the academic work 
before taking up the work of the department may be able to com- 
plete the Three Years' Course in two years. 

OUTLINE OF THE COURSE FOR DIPLOMA OR 
CERTIFICATE 

FIRST YEAR 

Practice Book of Leland Powers' School. — Evolution of Expression, Vols. I 
and II. 

Public Reading. — The major part of the time is devoted to fundamental prob- 
lems. A portion of each week is devoted to drill on selections of the student's indi- 
vidual choice, and these selections are presented at informal recitals during the year. 

Gesture. — Freeing exercises. Significance of carriage, attitude and movement. 
Principles of gesture. 

Voice. — Fundamental work of freeing and developing the voice. Basic prin- 
ciples of voice production; voice placing, deep breathing, control of breath, vowel 
forming, consonantal articulation, development of vocal range, intonation, melody 
of speech. Correction of individual faults. 



St. Marys Bulletin 73 

Dramatic Art. — Platform deportment. Correct sitting, standing and walking, 
entrance and exit, platform methods and traditions. Presentation of scenes and 
one act plays. 

Pantomime. — Elementary principles. Correction of defects and mannerisms 
in bodily expression and in facial expression. 

SECOND YEAR 

Practice Book of Leland Powers' School. — Evolution of Expression, Vols. Ill 
and IV. Principles of the four volumes — a careful study of the sixteen laws of evolu- 
tion which are founded on psychological principles. 

Public Reading.— Students are allowed more freedom in their choice of selec- 
tions. 

Gesture. 

Voice. — Review of fundamentals. 

Emerson System of Physical Culture. 

Dramatic Art. — Presentation of scenes and one-act plays. 

Recitals. 

THIRD YEAR. 

Poetic Interpretation. — The poetry of Tennyson, Lowell, Longfellow, Kipling, 
and other masters. 

Applied Gesture and Voice. 

Physical Training. — The four divisions of the Emerson System in their relation 
to unity and expression. (Normal work). 

Impersonation. — Two or more Shakespearean plays with special reference to the 
differentiation of the characters. 

Dramatic Art. — Study of the farce, comedy, burlesque, melodrama, and tragedy. 
Dramatization of a story or original plot. 

Recitals. (Public). 

FOURTH YEAR 

Poetic Interpretation. — Continued. 
Extemporaneous Speaking and Debate. 
Pedagogy. 
Psychology. 

Gymnastics. — Floor work, including free exercises, apparatus work, marching, 
indoor and outdoor games. 

Bible. — Bible and hymn reading. 
Impersonation. — Continued. 
Dramatic Art. — Classical plays. 
Recitals. 



HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Home Economics, as a distinctive subject of study, is a study of 
the economic, sanitary and aesthetic aspects of food, clothing and 
shelter as connected with their selection, preparation and use by 
the family in the home, or by other groups of people. Reference 
is also made to composition, classification, manufacture, adulter- 
ation and cost. 

The Home Economics Department of St. Mary's accomplishes 
this instruction with the idea of developing the skill and self-reliance 
of the individual student, by the courses described. 

The purpose of the instruction is to afford training in the sub- 
jects that pertain to life in the home, to aid the young woman to 
become proficient in practical housekeeping, and in making the 
home more beautiful. 

The constant aim of the courses is to develop the initiative and 
independence of the student, skill in practical use of materials, 
and a knowledge of economical purchase and wise selection as of 
equal importance. 

Well equipped laboratories for cooking and sewing afford excellent 
facilities for class work. 

The work is planned to extend over two courses: a first year 
course and a second year course. 

A Third Year may be added to the Home Economics Course for 
1919-'20, to be known as Home Economics III. This will include: 

Home Economics A-III: Advanced Cookery. Advanced 
Dietetics. 

Home Economics B-III: Advanced Course in Dressmaking: 

1 . Drafting of paper patterns. 
Application of these patterns in dressmaking. 

2. Practical experiments of textile fabrics in the Chemistry 

laboratory. 



St. Marys Bulletin 75 

AWARDS 

The Certificate in Home Economics is awarded on the completion 
of the four courses (A-I, A-II, B-I and B-II) to those students who 
have also completed the Minimum of Academic Work in the Col- 
lege required for all Certificates. The Minimum of Academic 
Work is the same as for Certificates in other departments except 
that Science D (Chemistry) must be included in the 12 elective 
points. 

The Certificate in Domestic Science is awarded on the completion 
of Home Economics A-I and A-II, under the same conditions as the 
full certificate as regards academic requirements. 

THE COURSES 

Home Economics A-I (" 'Domestic Science /"); General Cooking 
(First Year) (Academic credit: 2 points). Four hours a week of 
practical work and one hour of theory, in which the practical as 
well as the theoretical work is discussed. 

The course includes a study of the following: 

I. Food materials and foodstuffs. — What food is; vegetable 
and animal foods; foodstuffs; foodstuffs in nutrition; food 
adjuncts. 

II. Fuels and cooking apparatus. — Comparison of different 
fuels; their use; their cost. 

III. Food Preparation. — (a) Principles of cooking; (b) Care 
of food in the house; (c) Weighing and measuring; (d) Pro- 
cesses of food preparation; (e) Preparing and mixing; (f) Cook- 
ing processes; (g) Disposal of waste food. 

IV. Causes of spoiling foods. — Methods of preservation. 

V. Heat and its application to food. — Methods of conveying; 
losses in heating. 

VI. Special attention to various methods of preparing: Fruits; 
vegetables; cereals and their products; milk and milk products; 
eggs; fish; meats and meat substitutes. 



76 St. Mary's Bulletin 

VII. Household sanitation. — The dwelling; its location, 
selection and furnishing in relation to health problems; includ- 
ing also a study of lighting, ventilating and heating; the rela- 
tion of germ life to water, ice and milk supplies, and to other 
foods, both uncooked and preserved by various methods. 

Home Economics A-II ("Domestic Science" II): (Second Year). 
(Academic credit: 2 points). A continuation of Home Economics 
A-I, with the addition of the following: 

I. Food and dietetics. — Study of composition and nutritive 
value of foods; simple food chemistry; diet and dietaries. 

II. Household management. — Expenditure for food and shel- 
ter; buying and shopping methods; menus; balanced meals; 
relation to nutrition and cost. 
III. Cooking: 

1 . Applied dietaries. — Invalid and infant cookery. 

2. Fancy cooking. — Methods of preparation, garnishing 
and serving. 

Special attention is paid in Home Economics A-I and A-II to 
preparation and serving. In serving, the table equipment, setting 
of the table and serving are carefully studied and practiced. 

A large recently remodeled and newly equipped domestic science 
kitchen is arranged to provide the best facilities for class-work, 
both individual and co-operative, and a special dining-room gives 
the class opportunity for putting into practice methods of service. 
A series of luncheons is served by the class in this dining-room, 
applying the lessons on the laying of the table, the serving of differ- 
ent meals, the preparation of the meal, the care of the dining-room, 
and of the table, silver, china, etc. 

Home Economics B-I ("Domestic Art I") (First Year): General 
Sewing. — It is the aim of this course to train the fingers and to 
teach the student to apply the stitches as a means of constructing 
a definite article. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 77 



The course includes: 



I. Handwork: 

a. The simple and necessary stitches required in gar- 

ment making, learned as needed. The follow- 
ing are suggestive: hemming, gathering, run- 
ning, overhand, etc. 

b. Seams and application usually needed, such as: 

French fell, tailor's, etc., and plackets. 

c. Decoration. — Simple and attractive, designed and 

applied by the students making use of simple 
and decorative stitches. 

II. Machine work. — Use and care of machine and its simple 
attachments. 

III. Taking of measurements. — Cutting and making of un- 
dergarments. 

IV. Study of commercial patterns. — Their use, alteration and 
interpretation. 

V. Study and discussion of: 

a. Textile materials.— -Their growth, use and manu- 

facture. 

b. Economics of dress; economics of selection of ma- 

terials. 

c. Care and repair of clothing. — Suggestions for daily 

use, mending and remodeling. 

Home Economics B-II ("Domestic Art II") (Second Year): Ad- 
vanced course in Garment Making to follow the general course. 

It is the object of this course to give the student some technical 
skill which she can increase with practice. It includes the fol- 
lowing: 

I. Review of principles learned in general course of sewing. 



78 St. Marys Bulletin 

II. Construction of more advanced garments: 

a. Cotton dress of sheer material — tucked blouse, 

principle of inserting lace or embroidery. 

b. Close fitting lining — putting together, fitting, fin- 

ished seams. 

c. Wool dress, plans for seam finish, placket, fastenup. 

III. Embroidery and decorative work — Towels, doilies, etc. 

IV. Discussion of such subjects as: 

a. Clothing — Uses and selection; relation to health. 

b. History of costume. 

c. Costume design. Importance of artistic dress and 

its requirements; principles of design; value 
in color; color harmony; simplicity in dress; 
appropriateness. 

d. Use of patterns — Choice of materials; cost; eco- 

nomical cutting of garments, etc. 

TEXT-BOOKS 

The courses are based on the text-books of Professors Kinne and 
Cooley of Teachers' College, Columbia University, and students 
use these books as reference text-books. 

A I and A II: Kinne & Cooley, Foods and Household Management. 
B I and B II: Kinne & Cooley, Shelter and Clothing. 

Constant reference is also had to the other current literature of 
the subject. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
TRAINING 

Special stress at St. Mary's is laid on the care of the health and 
the physical training of the students. 

All resident students are required to spend an hour daily in open 
air exercise, and all resident students, except Seniors and Juniors, 
are required to take the regular physical training course for three 
periods weekly. 

A special class is provided for those who require special treat- 
ment, either on account of physical peculiarities or weakness. For 
such cases the family physician should send written instructions. 

THE GYMNASIUM 

The Gymnasium in Clement Hall is ideal for the purpose, and is 
excellently equipped. The regular physical training exercises are 
given here, and the athletic sports are held here when the weather 
is unsuitable for games outside. So far as possible, however, the 
training is given in the open, and the climate of Raleigh makes open 
air games and exercise possible practically throughout the year. 

The one aim of the Physical Training Department is the con- 
servation and development of the health of the students by their 
better physical training. 

To determine the training proper for each student, and to make 
it possible to denote the degree of improvement, a physical exam- 
ination, with physical measurements and strength tests, is made 
of each student by the School Physician and the Physical Director 
at the beginning of each session, and also during the second half- 
year. Comparative statements are sent to parents for their in- 
formation. 



80 St. Mary's Bulletin 

THE COURSE 

Daily exercise is required of all resident students. 

The course is thoroughly practical, and is intended to train the 
students in the art of managing their bodies, in standing, walking, 
using their limbs, breathing, and the like. The exercise is most 
wholesome, and the training imparts to the students suggestions 
about their health which will be most useful to them throughout 
life. 

Short talks on general hygiene are also given by the Physical 
Director. 

Gymnastics: Two periods each week are devoted to Gymnastics 
with or without apparatus, and to games and folk dances. 

The course includes free arm exercises with Indian Clubs and 
Dumb-bells for general development; folk-dances and exercises on 
German and Swedish apparatus to overcome awkwardness and 
develop strength, etc. 

Athletics: At least one period each week is used in playing one 
or more of the team games: Basketball, Volleyball, Captainball, or 
Playground-baseball. 

AESTHETIC DANCING 

A class or classes in Aesthetic Dancing begins during the fall 
term, and the course consists of twenty lessons, for which the 
charge is $15. 

A member of this class is allowed to substitute the Aesthetic 
Dancing for the regular Physical Culture classes on the days of the 
Dancing Class. 

The Athletic Associations (mentioned on page 24) are under the 
general supervision of the Physical Director. Fall and Spring Out- 
door Meets, Match Games almost weekly between the teams in 
the games mentioned above, and Tennis Tournaments are held 
each year under the direction of the Department. 




The Freshmen tn Their "School Party" Costumes 




The Juniors in Their "School Party" Costumes 




The Seniors in Cap and Gown for the "School Party" 







The Seniors With the Daisy Chain on Class Day 



St. Marys Bulletin 81 

GYMNASIUM COSTUME 

For use in the Physical Training classes each member of these 
classes is required to have 

One pair of full, black bloomers, 
Four all white middy blouses, 
One black kerchief tie. 
Three pairs of black cotton stockings, 
One pair of leather gymnasium shoes. 

The shoes will be properly fitted and furnished at the School; 
the other requirements should be provided before leaving home and 
brought to the School by the student. 



GENERAL SCHOOL REGULATIONS 



In accepting the responsibility for the care of the stu- 
dents at St. Mary's, it is necessary to state that no board- 
ing student is desired whose sense of honor is not suf- 
ficiently developed to make it possible to trust her — 

(/) Not to endanger life and property by forbidden use 
of fire, 

(2) Not to go off the ample school grounds without per- 
mission, and 

(3) Not to be out of her proper place when she is ex- 
pected and supposed to be in her own bed. 



The effort of St. Mary's School is to maintain, as far as possible, 
the family life of the students entrusted to its care. 

Local students are expected to conform to all the household re- 
quirements of the School while present. 

The desire of parents will always be carefully considered, but the 
final authority in all cases is vested with the Rector. It is under- 
stood that in sending a student to the School the parent agrees to 
submit to such rules as the Rector thinks necessary for the good of 
the School as a whole. 

Parents wishing students to have special permission for any pur- 
pose should communicate directly with the Rector, and not through 
the student. 

No student will be permitted to take less than the minimum 
hours of work. 

Written explanations must be presented by students requesting 
excuse for absence, tardiness, or lack of preparation in any duty. 



St. Marys Bulletin 83 

EXAMINATIONS 

No student is excused from any of the regular school examina- 
tions, and all examinations missed by reason of illness must be 
made up. 

ATTENDANCE 

All students are required to arrive in time for the opening of 
the School session, and to remain until it closes. If they arrive 
late, without the Rector's approval, they are liable to forfeiture of 
their places in the School. If withdrawn before the close without 
the Rector's approval, their connection with the School is per- 
manently terminated, and their claim to a certificate of honorable 
dismissal is forfeited. 

HOLIDAYS 

The only recess, or holiday, when students are allowed to leave the 
School, is at the time of the Christmas vacation. 

This holiday, as a rule, is of two weeks duration. Every student 
is required to be present on time at the close of the Christmas 
vacation. 

There is no Thanksgiving or Easter holiday, and students are 
not to leave the School at these seasons. Thanksgiving Day is a 
free day to be celebrated in the School, and Good Friday is a Holy 
Day, but otherwise the school duties are not interrupted. 

ABSENCE 

With the exception noted below, students are not allowed to 
leave the School except in cases of severe illness, or for some other 
reason so serious as to seem sufficient to the Rector. The applica- 
tion should be made as early as possible directly by the parent to 
the Rector, in writing, if possible. 

The following exception to this rule is, however, permitted: If 
the student's record warrants it, the Rector will allow the student 
one visit to her home about March 1st on the request of the parent 



84 St. Marys Bulletin 

that she be allowed to come, the student leaving the School after 3 
P. M. Saturday, and returning the following Monday evening. 

While the Rector will grant such permissions, it is his duty to 
say that, in a session of only thirty-four weeks, with a recess at 
Christmas, such absences are highly undesirable for the sake of the 
student and the whole School. Experience shows that any inter- 
ruption of the school routine is usually demoralizing to the students; 
that the student who goes home is thereby made ill in a surprising 
percentage of cases, and that the probable exposure to contagious 
diseases while traveling makes such a student on her return a 
possible menace to the health of the school. 

An extension for serious cause of permitted absence must be ob- 
tained before the expiration of the time for which the original per- 
mission was given. 

No absence whatever can be allowed within one week of Thanks- 
giving Day, or Washington's Birthday, or from Palm Sunday to 
Easter, inclusive. 

A student who overstays her absence without the Rector's per- 
mission and approval will, by that act, terminate her connection 
with the School. 

VISITS 

The presence of a parent in Raleigh does not in any respect 
absolve a student from any regulations of the School without per- 
mission from the Rector, and obedience to the conditions govern- 
ing such permissions is a matter between the student and the Rector 
alone. 

The Rector is glad to have parents visit their daughters in 
Raleigh as often and for as long a time as may be convenient to 
them, and he will take pleasure in granting all possible privileges, 
not inconsistent with the welfare of the School, to enable parent 
and daughter to see each other. It is, however, not convenient 
to have parents spend the night at the school. In general, students 
are not excused during school hours, and no exception is made to this 
rule, except where a parent from a distance happens to stop over in 



St. Mary's Bulletin 85 

Raleigh for only an hour or two. Except for very serious neces- 
sity, parents are urgently requested not to ask that their daughters 
come to the Railway Station to meet them. 

No student is allowed to spend the night outside of the School 
except with her mother, or one who sustains a mother's relation 
to her. 

Visitors are not desired on Sunday. Ladies from the city are 
heartily welcome on afternoons other than Saturday or Sunday 
between half-past three and six. The members of the Faculty, 
assisted by some of the students, receive once a month on Wed- 
nesdays from four to half-past five. 

All visitors are received in the parlor. 

Invitations to students should be sent through the Rector. 

CHURCH ATTENDANCE 

Town students, as well as resident students, are required to at- 
tend the daily Chapel service at 8:45 A. M. As St. Mary's is 
distinctly a Church school, all resident students are required to at- 
tend all Chapel services. 

ROOMS 

The assignment of students to quarters is determined on the 
basis of date of formal application, age, classification, and length 
of time at the School. To obtain a room assigned a student must 
arrive on time. 

(1) Until May 1st of each year, the applications of present stu- 
dents have preference over the applications of prospective students 
in the designation of the choice of room-places for the following 
year. 

(2) Definite room-places are in no case assigned unless applica- 
tions are regularly made for all the room-places in that room. If a 
student who files her application has no prospective room-mate 
with application on file she may be assigned to a definite hall, but 
not to a definite room. 



86 St. Mary's Bulletin 

(3) West Rock will be reserved for the younger students. 
Students who are both below the Freshman Class or less than 
sixteen years of age at the date of entrance will ordinarily be as- 
signed to West Rock. (Present students will be reassigned to West 
Rock if they will be in the A class the second year, regardless 
of age.) 

In assigning students to rooms, the Rector does not waive the 
right to change a student at any time from one room to another if, 
in his judgment, it is best for the order of the School. 

COMMUNICATIONS 

All telegrams for the students should be addressed to the Rector. 

All letters with regard to the students should be addressed to 
the Rector, but, when desired, communications pertaining to their 
health and personal welfare may be addressed to the Lady Prin- 
cipal. 

Correspondence with the home circle is freely encouraged, but 
beyond this there is no time, even were it otherwise desirable, for 
letter writing. 

DRESS 

Parents will confer a favor by consulting simplicity in the dress 
of their daughters, and no dresses of extreme cut may be worn. 

All students are expected to wear simple white dresses at Com- 
mencement and at all public entertainments given by the School. 

Dressmaking should, so far as possible, be attended to at home, 
as there is neither time nor opportunity for it while at St. Mary's. 

HEALTH PRECAUTIONS 

Students exposed to contagious diseases should not return to the 
School without previous consultation with the Rector. 

The Rector strongly advises inoculation for immunity against 
smallpox and typhoid to be administered at home during vacation 
before entering the School. 



St. Marys Bulletin 87 

FOOD 

It is a universal experience that boxes of food constantly cause 
sickness, hence the rule that students may receive one box of food 
at Thanksgiving and one at Easter. Food sent at other times 
will be sent to the City Hospital. Candy may be sent occasion- 
ally, and fruit at any time. 

POCKET MONEY. 

The School cannot pay bills or advance funds to students for any 
purpose unless a special deposit has been made for that purpose. 
A monthly allowance, limited in amount, to be deposited with the 
School and paid to the student weekly is recommended, as tending 
to give the student a proper sense of the value of money and of 
responsibility in the use of it. 

Bills must positively not be contracted at the stores, and the mer- 
chants are notified to this effect. 

GENERAL DISCIPLINE 

With regard to discipline, it is desired to have as few rules and 
to grant as many privileges as possible. But in so large a com- 
munity the rules must be obeyed and enforced uniformly, and the 
privileges must be withdrawn if they are abused or work injury to 
the individual and the School, and it must be remembered that no 
privilege can be allowed to any one which could not, under similar 
circumstances, be allowed to all who ask for it. In working together 
for the good of the whole School, both parents and the School 
authorities will, in the end, succeed best in securing the good of 
each individual. 



A student's character depends on learning the duty of 
obedience to law and order. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 



REQUISITES 

Boarding students are required to bring with them — 

Bed-linen for single bed: 

4 sheets, 63x90. 

3 pillow-cases, 19x34. 

2 counterpanes, white. 

1 pair blankets. 
6 towels, 
Cloak or cape, 
Umbrella, 

At least one pair of stout high shoes. 
Overshoes. 

These, and all articles of clothing, must be distinctly marked 
with the owner's name. 

See also list of Gymnasium requisites, page 81 . 



RMS 

must be paid quarterly in advance, 
it due is sent to each parent or 
\e dates of payment in September, 
:h, but failure to receive this notice 
delay in payment. All bills must 
(udenls are to remain in school. 

idays or for absence or withdrawal 
n cases of protracted sickness. In 
protracted sickness amounting to a 
i parent will divide the loss equally 

hdrawal at Christmas, nor within 
session, nor is allowance made for 



IANCE 

required of all resident students 
for entrance, as a guarantee for 
10 case returned, but on the en- 
1 to her regular account. 



R RESIDENT STUDENTS 

hool year 1919-20 is $450. This 
J all regular school fees in the 
nts. 

Board, Heat, Light, Room-place, 
y Fee, and Academic or Business 



St. Marys 



REQUIS1 

Boarding students are required to 

Bed-linen for single b< 
4 sheets, 63x 
3 pillow-case 
2 counterpai 
1 pair blank 

6 towels, 

Cloak or cape, 

Umbrella, 

At least one pair of s 

Overshoes. 

These, and all articles of cloth 
with the owner's name. 

See also list of Gymnasium reqi 



TERMS 

All regular fees are due and must be paid quarterly in advance. 
A memorandum of the amount due is sent to each parent or 
guardian a few days before the dates of payment in September, 
November, January, and March, but failure to receive this notice 
cannot be offered in excuse for delay in payment. All bills must 
be paid promptly when due if students are to remain in school. 

No deduction is made for holidays or for absence or withdrawal 
of students from school, except in cases of protracted sickness. In 
case of absence on account of protracted sickness amounting to a 
month or more the school and the parent will divide the loss equally 
for the remainder of the half-year. 

No allowance is made for withdrawal at Christmas, nor within 
one month of the close of the session, nor is allowance made for 
late entrance in the first quarter. 



ENTRANCE 

An Entrance Fee of $25 is required of all resident students 
at the time of filing application for entrance, as a guarantee for 
holding place. This fee is in no case returned, but on the en- 
trance of the student is credited to her regular account. 



REGULAR CHARGES FOR RESIDENT STUDENTS 

The regular charge for the school year 1919-20 is $450. This 
includes all living expenses and all regular school fees in the 
Academic or Business Departments. 

The regular charge includes Board, Heat, Light, Room-place, 
Laundry, Contingent Fee, Library Fee, and Academic or Business 
Tuition. 



90 St. Mary's Bulletin 

EXTRA CHARGES 

FEES IN THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT, 1919-20 
(Two half-hour lessons each week) 

For Piano Lessons $60 (or) $70 

For Voice Lessons from the Director 80 

For Voice Lessons from the Assistant 70 

For Violin Lessons 70 

For Organ Lessons 70 

For the use of Piano for practice 5 

For the use of the Organ for practice 10 

These are the charges for one hour's practice each school day during the 
session. Additional practice is charged at the same rates. 

For Theory of Music, Harmony, or History of Music $10 

These subjects are taught in small classes, with two half-hour lessons each 
week. The charge for each class is $10. 

Music pupils are required to take one of these classes in connection with their 
Music Lessons. 

For Lessons in Normal Music $80 

FEES IN THE ART DEPARTMENT 

First Year Work (Drawing, etc.) $40 

Second and Third Year Work 60 

Painting in Oil or Water Color, etc. 

Tuition in History of Art 10 

Work in special classes at special rates. 



St. Marys Bulletin 91 

FEES IN THE BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
Full Tuition $60 

This includes any or all of the business branches, with English and Arithmetic. 
No reduction is made for a partial course except as follows: 

Typewriting alone $25 

Bookkeeping alone 25 

These fees include the use of typewriter for practice. 

FEES IN THE EXPRESSION DEPARTMENT 

Private Lessons $60 

Two half-hour lessons each week. 

Class Lessons (in small classes) $25 

No charge is made to Expression pupils for the work in Dramatics done in 
connection with the regular lessons. 

FEES IN THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Tuition in Home Economics A (Cooking, etc.) $30 

The Laboratory Fee to cover the cost of supplies is additional and will be 
about $5 for the year. 

Tuition in Home Economics B (Sewing, etc.) $20 

Materials furnished and charged at cost on the Incidental Account. 

OCCASIONAL FEES 

Laboratory Fee. — A fee of from $3 to $5 is charged students 
using the Science Laboratory. 

This fee is to cover cost of material and varies with the course. 

Graduating Fee. — A fee of $5 is charged each student receiving 
a Diploma in any department; and a fee of $2 is charged each 
student receiving a Certificate. 



92 St. Mary's Bulletin 

INCIDENTAL CHARGES 

These are not properly school charges, but are simply charges 
for materials or money which the School furnishes to the student 
as a convenience to the parent. 

A statement of the Incidental Account is sent quarterly. 

Parents are requested to make an Incidental Deposit to cover 
the cost of materials bought by the School and furnished to the 
students, and also to provide pocket money. As these charges 
will vary with need, no definite statement can be made, but 
ordinarily $35 for the year will be sufficient in addition to the 
allowance for pocket money. 

Books and Stationery, Sheet Music, and Art Materials are 
furnished by the School and charged at regular prices. 

It is advisable that the pocket money should be furnished 
only through the School, and it is urged that the amount should 
not exceed one dollar a week- 

EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF 
REGULAR CHARGES 

The regular charges given in concise form on page 89 may be further explained 
as follows: 

Academic Tuition. — The charge is the same for a full course or 4 
a partial course. 

A student, however, taking only one or two classes, is charged 
$25 a class. 

Laundry. — The regular charge for the year covers an average 
of $1.75 worth of laundry each week, or $56 worth for the year, 
at regular laundry prices. Additional pieces are charged extra 
at half rates. Laundry lists with prices will be sent on request. 
Pupils are expected to limit the number of fancy pieces. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 93 

Medical Fee. — This fee, which is included in the regular charge, 
entitles boarding students to the attention of the School Phy- 
sician in all cases of ordinary sickness, and to such ordinary 
medical supplies as may be needed, without further charge. Cases 
of major surgery, however, and special treatment of eyes, ears, 
etc., and dental services are not included, and the expense of these, 
when necessary, must be borne by the parent or guardian. It 
is understood that any patron may, if so inclined, pay a special 
fee to the School Physician, in cases of extraordinary or long- 
continued sickness. All special prescriptions are charged extra. 

The following statement with regard to the School Physician 
was adopted at the May, 1914, meeting of the Executive Com- 
mittee: 

"The health of the School is under the charge of the School 
Physician, and all boarding students are under his care, but with 
the previous consent of the Rector and the School Physician 
some other reputable physician may be called in to meet the 
School Physician in consultation." 

DEDUCTIONS 

A deduction of 10 per cent in the tuition charge is made in the case of students 
who take Vocal and Instrumental Music, Piano and Elocution, Music and Art, 
and like combinations. This deduction is made only to students who pay full 
Academic tuition. 

A deduction of $25 each for the year is made in the charges when two or more 
resident students enter from the same family. 

A deduction of 10 per cent of the charge for Academic tuition is made when 
two or more local students enter from the same family. 

These deductions are conditional on the bill being paid in advance. 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN ST. MARY'S 

In order to receive the benefit of any scholarship paying more 
than $60 a year the scholarship holder is expected to fulfill the 
following conditions: 

1. She must by examination enter at least as high as the Freshman 

class of the College without conditions. 

2. She must take at least fifteen points of college work each year. 

3. She must take a regular course in the College leading to gradu- 

ation. 

4. She must each year do such work and conduct herself in such a 

way as to receive the recommendation of the Rector for con- 
tinuance or reappointment as a holder of the scholarship. 

5. Scholarship girls must file regular application papers; must pay 

the Application Fee by August 1st; and must pay promptly 
each quarter such proportion of cash as is required over and 
above the amount the scholarship provides. 

These rules have been in effect for a number of years. 
The regularly established scholarships in St. Mary's are as 
follows: 

COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. The David R. Murchison Scholarship, endowed 1903 ($300). 

(For the Diocese of East Carolina.) 

2. The Smedes Memorial (Alumnae) Scholarship, endowed 1904 

($270). 
These scholarships, when vacant, are filled by competitive 
examination of qualified applicants. They will next be vacant 
for the session of 1 920-2 1 . 

NON-COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 

(A). Clergy Scholarships. For daughters of the clergy. Not 
limited in number. Allotted by the Rector of St. Mary's. 
To these scholarships only Conditions 4 and 5 above apply. 
The value of each of these scholarships is $60 for non-resi- 
dent students and $100 for resident students. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 95 

(B). 1. Raleigh City Schools Scholarships. ($60 each.) One filled 
each year. The holder nominated by the Superintendent. 

2. Mary Ruffin Smith Scholarship of the Diocese of North 

Carolina. ($60). The holder nominated by the Bishop 
of the Diocese. 

3. Mary Cain Scholarship. The holder designated by the 

Rector with preference to the descendants of the said 
Mary Cain. 
(C). 1. Mary Ruffin Smith Scholarships of the Diocese of North 
Carolina. (Two, $250 each.) The holders nominated 
by the Bishop of the Diocese. 

2. Mary E. Chapeau Scholarship of the Diocese of North 

Carolina. ($250). The holder nominated by the Bishop 
of the Diocese. Primarily for daughters of the clergy. 

3. Mary E. Chapeau Scholarship of the Diocese of East 

Carolina. ($250.) The holder nominated by the Bishop 
of East Carolina. Primarily for daughters of the clergy. 

4. The Madame Clement Memorial Scholarship. ($250.) The 

holder nominated by the President of the Board of 
Trustees after conference with his fellow Bishops of 
the Board. 

5. The Eliza Battle Pitlman Scholarships. (Two, $250 each.) 

The holders residents of Edgecombe County, North 
Carolina. Nominated by the Rector and Vestry of 
Calvary Church, Tarboro, N. C. 

6. The Martin Scholarship. ($180.) The holder appointed 

by the President of the Board of Trustees, acting for 
the Board. 

7. The South Carolina Scholarships. Provided by funds 

contributed by the Diocese of South Carolina. The 
holders residents of South Carolina. The appointments 
made and amount of scholarships allotted by the Bishop 
of South Carolina. 

Note. — From the David R. Murchison Scholarship, the Martin Scholarship, 
the South Carolina Scholarships, and the Mary Cain Scholarship the School 
receives annually the cash amount credited to the holder of the scholarship 
There is no such return to the School in the case of the other scholarships. 



THE ALUMNAE OF ST, MARY'S 

OFFICERS OF THE ST. MARY'S ALUMN/E 
ASSOCIATION FOR 1919-1920 

Mrs. Thomas Walter Bickett, President Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Nannie B. Ashe, Vice-President Raleigh, N. C. 

Miss Kate McKimmon, Secretary St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Miss Loula T. Busbee, Asst. Secretary. . r Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Treasurer St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 



ALUMNAE COUNCIL 

Mrs. Ashby L. Baker, Raleigh, N. C. until 1920 

Miss Gertrude Royster, Raleigh, N. C. until 1920 

Mrs. J. S. Holmes, Chapel Hill, N. C. until 1921 

Mrs. Walter Montgomery, Raleigh, N. C. until 1921 

Mrs. J. J. Bernard, Raleigh, N. C. until 1922 

Miss Florence W. Slater, New York City until 1922 

And the officers ex officio. 

The Alumnae Association of St. Mary's, which was first estab- 
lished in 1880 and meets annually at Commencement, has done 
effective work in aiding the progress of the school and is strong 
and vigorous. 

In addition to constant assistance rendered St. Mary's by the 
individual members, the Association has completed three special 
works of importance and is now actively interested in the cam- 
paign of the Trustees for the $250,000 Fund. 

(1) The Foundation of the Smedes Memorial Scholarship in St. 
Mary's, in memory of the founder and first Rector of St. Mary's 
his wife, and his son, the second Rector, was undertaken early 
in the life of the Association and completed in 1903, when an 
endowment of $4,000 was turned over to the Trustees. 




Snapshots of 1918-1919 
Welcome to the Returning 113th 
The Grove in the One Snow of the Winter 
Reminders of the •'Colonial Ball" 




May Day: The May Queen and Her Court 




May Day: The Flag Drill 



St. Mary's Bulletin 97 

(2) The Enlarging and Improving of the Chapel, around which 
the fondest recollections and deepest interest of the Alumnae 
center, was undertaken in 1904, and the enlargement and adorn- 
ment was completed in 1905 at a cost of more than $3,500. 

(3) The Endowment of the Mary Iredell Fund and the Kate 
McKimmon Fund in St. Mary's, the third work of the Associa- 
tion, was undertaken at the 1907 Commencement and the sum 
reached $5,000 in 1916. 

The Alumnae are organized as far as possible into local Chapters 
in their several cities and towns, and these Chapters hold semi- 
annual meetings on November 1st, Founders' Day, and May 
12th, Alumnae Day, each year. 

There are upwards of 150 active members of the Raleigh 
Alumnae Chapter, and there are active Chapters in New York 
and Baltimore, as well as in many places nearer home. 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

1-919- 1920 ! <* - x °\ 



*?4 



(The 



\p> 



,C\ 



Albertson, Bertha 

Battle, Helen 

Bowne, Elizabeth. 

Burke, Nina 

Drane, Marian. . . 
Erwin, Josephine. 
Fallon, Margaret. 



Batts, Katherine. . 

Blanton, Millicent . 

Cooper, Nina 

Davis, Sara 

Glass, Rainsford . . . 

Higgs, Annie 

*Hoke, Mary 

"Lay, Nancy 

*Miller, Pauline 

Moffitt, Mary 



indicates non-resident students.) 
SENIOR GLASS 



N. C. Kirtland, Mildred Fla. 

N. C. *Kitchin, Elizabeth N. C. 

N. C. Lay, Ellen N. C. 

. .La. Toler, Louise N. C. 

N. C. Waddell, Elizabeth N. C. 

N. C. Wilson, Mary C N. C. 

N. C. 



JUNIOR CLASS 



.N.C. 
.N.C. 

N.C. 

.S. C. 



..Fla. 

.N.C. 
.N.C. 
.N.C. 



.N.C. 
.N.C. 



Rawlings, Margaret N.C. 

Ruffin, Jane N.C. 

Smith, Adelaide N.C. 

Sublett, Eleanor Va. 

Thomas, Eugenia Ga. 

Toy, Jane N.C. 

Wilkes, Carrie Mclver N. C. 

*Womble, Ruth N.C. 

Yellott, Mary Md. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



Alston, Katherine 

Anderson, Lucy London 
Avent, Lou Spencer .... 
Barnard, Margaret. 

Cheek, Alice 

Collier, Elizabeth . . 

Collier, Susan 

Hart, Nancy 



.N.C. 
N.C. 
.N.C. 
..Del. 
.N.C. 
.N.C. 
.N.C. 
.N.C. 



Henry, Frances N. C. 

Howell, Virginia N. J. 

Kirtland, Dorothy Fla. 

Miller, Catherine N. C. 

Nolan, Elizabeth Ga. 

Patterson, Juanita Va. 

Sherrod, Pa.tty N.C. 

White, Nelle N.C. 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Ashton, Helen . . . 
Avent, Estelle. . . 
Bailey, Millicent. 



Colo. 
.N.C. 
D.C. 



*Barber, Harriet 

Barnhill, Marjorie. 
Bonner, Elizabeth . 



.N.C. 
.N.C. 
.N.J. 



St. Marys Bulletin 



99 



Boyd, Catherine N. C. 

Branson, Elizabeth N. C. 

Cabell, Dorothy Va. 

Champion, Elizabeth Ga. 

•Cross, Elizabeth N. C. 

Cumming, Anne N. C. 

Duncan, Annie N. C. 

Fairley, Elsie N. C. 

Gareissen, Marietta N. C. 

Hawkins, Katherine Fla. 

•Hill, Randolph N. C. 

Hutson, Edith Fla. 

Kent, Florida S. C. 

*Linehan, Susan N. C. 

Meekins, Mahalah N. C. 

Moore, Caroline. N. C. 

Morgan, Florie Belle N. C. 

Moses, Elsie N. C. 

Mountcastle, Frances Holt.. . .N. C. 



McMurry, Sarah N. C. 

Pegram, Mary Stuart N. C. 

Pou, Margaret N. C. 

Powell, Louise N. C. 

Prather, Marion N. C. 

Ray, Anna N. C. 

Rembert, Augusta S. C. 

Susman, Bertha S. C. 

Thorne, Crichton N. C. 

Thorpe, Margaret N. C. 

Townsend, Hannah N. C. 

Venable, Frances N. C. 

Waddell, Katherine N. C. 

Walton, Louise N. C. 

Weeks, Preston D. C. 

Whedbee, Frances N. C. 

•Wilson, Mary B N. C. 

Williams, Helen N. C. 

Woody, Frances N. C. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



♦Adams, Margaretta N. C. 

Aiken, Florence Fla. 

Allen, Marion Va. 

Baker, Belzora Ala. 

•Baker, Elizabeth N. C. 

Barton, Fannie S. C. 

Baughm, Christine N. C. 

Bell, Lois Va. 

Bessellieu, Belle Ga. 

Best, Martha N. C. 

Bissett, Edith N. C. 

Blan% Hannah N. C. 

Blakeley, Nelle S. C. 

Blount, Dorothy Md. 

Bonner, Clarissa N. C. 

•Boylston, Adelaide N. C. 

Brock, Lois N. C. 

Budge, Helen Fla. 

Carr, Annie N. C. 

Carr, Martina N. C. 

Carson, Selma N. C. 



•Chamberlain, Melissa N. C. 

Collier, Eunice Ga. 

Copejand, Josephine N. C. 

Crawford, Jane N. C. 

•Dargan, Caroline N. C. 

Dawson, Mildred N. C. 

Dougherty, Muriel D. C. 

Duncan, Marion N. C. 

Dunwody, Florida Fla. 

Eberman, Betty N. C. 

Eccjes, Hope Va. 

Edmundson, Margaret N. C. 

Everett, Mary Louise N. C. 

•Fetter, Mary N. C. 

Fields, Maria Va. 

Fishel, Selma N. C. 

Flora, Virginia N. C. 

Forester, Margaret N. C. 

Foster, Rosalind Ga. 

Franklin, Grace N. C. 

Freeland, Elsie Va. 



100 



St. Marys Bulletin 



♦Grimes, Jane N. C. 

Hale, Elizabeth N. C. 

Hannah, Eloise N. C. 

♦Hart, Matilda N. C. 

Hawkins, Laura Fla. 

Hawkins, Mabel Fla. 

Hines, Elizabeth N. C. 

Hines, Leone N. C. 

Holmes, Carrie May N. C. 

Hoyt, Marjorie N. C. 

Huguenin, Gladys S. C. 

♦Jackson, Elizabeth N. C. 

Jacobs, Lucille N. C. 

James, Christine N. C. 

•Johnston, Mary N. C. 

♦Jcnes, Madeleine N. C. 

Jordan, Virginia N. C. 

*Kaupp, Madelon N. C. 

Kern, Frances Ga. 

Kirby-Smith, Carolina Mex. 

Lanier, Belle Ga. 

♦Lawrence, Elizabeth N. C. 

♦Lay, Lucy N. C. 

Lee, Mary Va. 

Lee, Olive Va. 

Lindsay, Elizabeth N. C. 

♦Manning, Annie Louise N. C. 

♦Marshall, Ethel N. C. 

Meggs, Grace Fla. 

Miller, Edith Term. 

♦Morgan, Mary Strange N. C. 

Morris, Lonie Fla. 

McCabe, Mary N. C. 

McMorris, Julia Va. 

MacRae, Carolina N. C. 

Norfleet, Mabel N. C. 



Page, Virginia Va. 

Parker, Beatrice N. C. 

Patch, Anna N. C. 

Powell, Dorothy N. C. 

♦Raney, Margaret N. C. 

♦Robbins, Roe Ella N. C. 

Roberson, Callie Mae N. C. 

Roberson, Helen N. C. 

Rogers, Ella S. C. 

♦Rosenthal, Corinne N. C. 

♦Russ, Julia N. C. 

♦Sanderford, Helen N. C. 

Scott, Virginia N. C. 

Smith, Anita Ga. 

Spence, Clare N. C. 

Springs, Margaret N. C. 

Swett, Doris N. C. 

Sydnor, Margaret N. C. 

Taylor, Sue Ga. 

♦Thomas, Anna Ball N. C. 

Thomas, Elizabeth S. C. 

Towles, Janice S. C. 

Tucker, Nannie N. C. 

♦Walters, Macon N. C. 

Ward, Emily N. C. 

♦Way, Evelyn N. C. 

♦Webb, Frances N. C. 

Weissenger, Helen S. C. 

Whitaker, Dorothy Tenn. 

♦Whitaker, Marie N. C. 

Wills, Lucy Lillian N. C. 

Wimberly, Mary Bryan N. C. 

Wright, Mary Ruth N. C. 

Yarborough, Mary Wiatt N. C. 

Yorke, Margaret. N. C. 

Yow, Flora Ga. 



BUSINESS CLASS 



Albertson, Bertha N. C. 

Barnard, Margaret Del. 

Baxter, Rebecca Tenn. 



♦Blacknall, Ella N. C. 

♦Bowen, Eunice N. C. 

♦Brantley, Eugenia N. C. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 



101 



Bristol, Augusta 


N. C. 


Brown, Margaret 


N.C. 


Buchanan, Evelyn 


Pa. 


Chrismon, Mildred 


N.C. 


Cooley, Mildred 


N.C. 


*Corr, Lucile 


N.C. 


Daughtridge, Mary Will. 


N.C. 


Dent, Louvenia 


N.C. 


Harris, Ruth 


N.C. 


Herrick, Virginia 


N.C. 


Hill, Hortense 


Ga. 


Holt, Myrtle 


N.C. 


Hughes, Evelyn 


N.C. 


Jackson, Clara 


Ga. 


* Johnson, Charlotte 


N.C. 


Keith, Kathryn 


N.C. 


Keyes, Anna 


N.C. 


Klingman, Katharine... . 


N.C. 


Low, Gertrude 


N.C. 



Lucas, Louise Va. 

Meggs, Leila Fla. 

Michael, Helen Va. 

McCoy, Helen N.C. 

♦McKethan, Ethel N. C. 

Northrop, Carolyn N. C. 

Nothwang, Jessie Ark. 

Nottingham, Lucia N.C. 

Pickett, Mary N. C. 

*Shipman, Josephine N.C. 

Sublett, Eleanor Va. 

Tayloe, Athalia N. C. 

Thomas, Eugenia Ga. 

Timberlake, Gladys N.C. 

Wallace, Mary Ga. 

Ward, Emily N.C. 

Wilkins, Blanche N. C. 

•Wilson, Ina N.C. 

Yellott, Mary Md. 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 
(All non-resident) 



Baker, Katharine Dom. Sci. 

Bonner, Blanche Piano 

Brown, Clyde Art 

Jones, Carmen Piano 

Matthews, Margaret Piano 

Maynard, Carey Violin 

McCarty, Jean Piano 



Ray, Bessie Violin 

Ray, Mary Cello 

Stancell, Fredericka Voice 

Staudt, Janie Violin 

Thompson, George Violin 

Williams, Howard Organ 

Wingate, Clara Violin 



INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT 
(All non-resident) 



Denson, Sara 
Dobbin, Virginia 
Green, Frances 
Hopkins, Lois 
Jones, Isabelle 
Lyon, Mary 
Mason, Eleanor 



Pendleton, Sylbert 
Rogers, Mishew 
Southerland, Sarah 
White, Lillian 
White, Ray 
Wright, Violet 
Yates, Mary Elizabeth 



102 



St. Mary's Bulletin 



PRIMARY 



Andrews, Julia 
Hamilton, Martha 
Hughes, Margaret 
Lawrence, Anne 
Preston, Mary 
Preston, Rhea 
Raney, Katharine 



Riddick, Eugenia 
Robbins, Susie May 
Thrift, Katharine 
Waite, Jeanette 
Waller, Dorothy 
White, Evangeline 
Withers, Mary Lawrence 



The Intermediate and Primary Departments will be discontinued in 1919 
1920. 

Total enrollment: 287. Resident students, 201 ; non-resident students, 86. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 103 

COMMENCEMENT AWARDS, 1919 

THE CLASS OF 1919 



FULL GRADUATES : 

Bertha Sears Albertson Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Helen Van Wyck Battle Tarboro, N. C. 

Marie Elizabeth Bowne Biltmore, N. C. 

Nina Hine Burke New Iberia, La. 

Marian Drane (Second Honor) Edenton, N. C. 

Josephine Erwin Durham, N. C. 

Margaret Stewart Fallon Durham, N. C. 

Mildred Elizabeth Kirtland St. Augustine, Fla. 

Elizabeth Kitchin (First Honor) Raleigh, N. C. 

Ellen Booth Lay Springfield, Mass. 

Carrie Louise Toler Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Elizabeth Nash Waddell Manchester, N. C. 

Mary Collett Wilson Greensboro, N. C. 

AWARDS IN THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

Certificates in Piano 

Katherine Alston Raleigh, N. C. 

Lou Spencer Avent Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Florie Belle Morgan Oriental, N. C. 

Teacher's Certificate in Piano 

Lou Spencer Avent Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Emma Marjorie Barnhill Robersonville, N. C. 

Anna Rogers Lay Springfield, Mass. 

Florie Belle Morgan Oriental, N. C. 

THE ART DEPARTMENT 

Certificates 

Helen Van Wyck Battle Tarboro, N. C. 

Josephine Erwin Durham, N. C. 

Susan Linehan Raleigh, N. C. 



104 St. Mary's Bulletin 

THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Full Certificates 

Margaret Barnard Camden, Del. 

Selma Eugene Fishel Vaughan, N. C. 

Virginia Archibold Howell Trenton, N. J. 

Sara Elizabeth McMurry Shelby, N. C. 

Certificate in Domestic Science 

Mildred Elizabeth Kirtland St. Augustine, Fla. 

Catharine Margaret Miller Henderson, N. C. 

THE BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

Full Certificates 

Rosa Mildred Chrismon Charlotte, N. C. 

Gertrude Louise Low Wilmington, N. C. 

Certificates in Stenography and Typewriting 

Bertha Sears Albertson Kathrine Klingman 

Margaret Barnard Louise Lucas 

Rebecca Lindsley Baxter Kathryn Anne McDowell 

Eunice Bowen Jessie Nothwang 

Eugenia Brantley Eleanor Sublett 

Augusta Bristol Eugenia Thomas 

Mildred Lassiter Cooley Carrie Mclver Wilkes 

Mary Will Daughtridge Ina Wilson 

Lena Mertyl Holt Mary Trail Yellott 
Kathryn Berger Keith 

Certificates in Typewriting and Bookkeeping 

Margaret Brown Leila Meggs 

Hortense Hill Josephine Shipman 

Lula Olive Lee Mary Emma Wallace 

Certificates in Typewriting . 

Marian Drane Lucy Fi f zhugh Lay 

Virginia Herrick Gladys Timberlake 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

"I give, devise, and bequeath to the Trustees of St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, North Carolina, their successors and assigns, 

absolutely and forever (the property given) 

in trust that it shall be used for the benefit of said school, in the 
discretion of said Trustees, for building, improvement, equipment, 
or otherwise" 

(or) 
"in trust to be invested and the income derived therefrom to be 
used for the benefit of said school in such manner and for such 
purposes as to the Trustees may seem best." 



S T MARYS 

SCHOOL 




\\ 



h\ 



BULLETIN 

J u LLGl.^ 



May 1920 Series 9, No. 2 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 




RALEIGH, N. C 

CATALOGUE 
NUMBER 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY ST. MARY/S SCHOOL 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as second class matter 
under act of Congress of July 16, 1894 



CALENDAR 



1920 



MAT 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T P S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 > 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 



1921 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 


MAY 


JUNE 


JULY 


AUGUST 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 1112 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 

22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 29 30 


1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
10 11 12 13 14 15 16 
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31 


12 3 4 5 6 

7 8 9 10 11 12 13 
14 15 16 17 18 19 20 
21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
28 29 30 31 


SEPTEMBER 


OCTOBER 


NOVEMBER 


DECEMBER 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 31 


12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 

20 21 22 23 24 25 26 

27 28 29 30 


12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



1922 



JANUARY 


FEBRUARY 


MARCH 


APRIL 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


S M T W T F S 


12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 
22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 
19 20 21 22 23 24 25 
26 27 28 


12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 

19 20 21 22 23 24 25 

26 27 28 29 30 31 


1 

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 

16 17 18 19 20 21 22 

23 24 25 26 27 28 29 

30 



CALENDAR FOR 1920-1921 



1920 

September 13, Monday Faculty assemble at St. Mary's. 

September 14, Tuesday Registration and Classification of City Stu- 
dents; New Resident Students report by 7 
P. M. 

September 15, Wednesday Preliminary Examinations; Old Resident Stu- 
dents report by 7 P. M.; Registration and 
Classification of Resident Students. 

September 16, Thursday Opening service of Advent Term (First Half- 
year) at 9 A. M. 

November 1 , Monday All Saints : Founders* Day. 

November 1 8, Thursday Second Quarter begins. 

November 25, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. 

December 22, Wednesday Christmas Recess begins at 3 P. M. 

1921 

January 4, Tuesday Resident Students report by 7 P. M. 

January 20, Thursday Easter Term (Second Half-year) begins. 

February 9, Ash Wednesday. Lent begins. 

March 10, Thursday Spring Recess begins at 12 M. 

March 15, Tuesday Resident Students report by 7 P. M. 

March 1 7, Thursday Last Quarter begins. 

March 25, Good Friday Holy Day. 

March 27 Easter Day. 

May 12, Thursday Alumnae Day; 79th Anniversary of the 

Founding of St. Mary's. 

May 22-24 Commencement Season. 

September 1 5, Thursday 80th Session begins. 



No absence from the school is alloroed at or 
near Thanksgiving Day, Washington's Birth- 
day, or from Palm Sunday to Easier, inclusive. 



INDEX 

Page 

The Calendar for 1920-1921 3 

The Board of Trustees 5 

The Faculty and Officers for 1919-1920 6 

Foreword , 9 

History and Description of the School 11 

Educational Position 13 

Equipment 15 

The Life 18 

The School Work 22 

The Student Organizations 23 

Work of the Departments 26 

Preparatory 26 

The College 26 

Admission 28 

Certificates 30 

Special Courses 32 

Classification, Graduation 33-34 

Awards, College Entrance Certificate 35 

Requirements for Certificates and Credits 37 

The Regular Academic Course 38 

The College Preparatory Course 39 

The "College" Course 40 

The Courses in Detail 43 

History 43 

English and Literature 44 

Foreign Languages. Ancient and Modern 47 

Mathematics 51 

Natural Science 54 

"Philosophy" 55 

Pedagogy 56 

Bible Study 56 

Music Department 58 

Art Department 67 

Expression Department 69 

Home Economics Department 72 

Business Department 77 

Physical Training Department 80 

General Regulations 82 

Requisites 88 

Terms 89 

Scholarships 95 

The Alumnae 98 

Register of Students, 1919-1920 100 

Form of Bequest 1 04 



THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



THE BISHOPS 

Rt. Rev. Jos. Blount Cheshire, D. D., Chairman Raleigh, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Wm. Alexander Guerry, D. D Charleston, S. C. 

Rt. Rev. Junius M. Horner, D. D Asheville, N. C. 

Rt. Rev. Thos. C. Darst, D. D Wilmington, N. C. 

CLERICAL AND LAY TRUSTEES 

North Carolina 
Rev. J. E. Ingle, Raleigh Rev. M. A. Barber, Raleigh 

Dr. R. H. Lewis, Raleigh Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, Henderson 

Mr. D. Y. Cooper, Henderson Col. Chas. E. Johnson, Raleigh 

Mr. Graham Andrews, Raleigh Mr. W. A. Erwin, Durham 
(untii 1924) (until 1921) 

East Carolina 
Rev. G. F. Hill, Elizabeth City Rev. R. B. Drane, D. D., Edenton 

Mr. Geo. C. Royall, Goldsboro Mr. Frank Wood, Edenton 
(until 1924) (until 1921) 

South Carolina 
Rev. T. T. Walsh, Yorkville Rev. L. G. Wood, New York City 

Mr. P. T. Hayne, Greenville Mr. T. W. Bacot, Charleston 

(until 1920) (until 1920) 

Asheville 
Rev. F. P. Lobdell, Rutherfordton Rev. H. N. Bowne, Biltmore 
Hon. Wm. A. Hoke, Lincolnton Mr. W. D. Anderson, Gastonia 
(until 1922) (until 1920) 

executive committee 

Rt. Rev. J. B. Cheshire, D. D., Chairman 
Col. Chas. E. Johnson Dr. R. H. Lewis 

Hon. W. A. Hoke Mr. George C. Royall 

Mr. D. Y. Cooper 

secretary and treasurer 

Dr. K. P. Battle, Jr., Raleigh, N. C. 

committee on raising the building and endowment fund 

Rev. Isaac W. Hughes, Chairman 
Mr. George C. Royall Mr. Graham H. Andrews 

special representative of the trustees for the purpose of 
raising the fund 

Rev. Francis M. Osborne, Sewanee, Tenn. 



THE FACULTY AND OFFICERS 
OF ST. MARY'S 

1919-1920 

Rev. WARREN W. WAY Rector 

Mrs. CHARLES E. PERKINS Lady Principal 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary and Business Manager 



THE ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 
Rev. WARREN W. WAY Bible and Ethic* 

(A.B., Hobart College, 1S97 ; General Theological Seminary. Rector of 
Grace Church, Cortland, N. Y., 1900-14; Rector of St. Luke's Church, 
Salisbury, 1914-18. Rector of St. Mary's, 1918 — ) 

WILLIAM E. STONE History and Political Science 

(A. B., Harvard, 1882; principal, Edenton, N. C, Academy, 1901-02; 
master in Porter Academy, Charleston, 1902-3. St. Mary's, 1903 — ) 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Psychology and Current History 

(A. B., Washington College, Md., 1897; A. M., 1898; graduate student 
Johns Hopkins University, 1900. St. Mary's, 1903 — ) 

FRANCES RANNEY BOTTUM Science 

(San Diego, Cal., Normal College, 1910-11; graduate St. Mary's, 1912; 
summer student, Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1913, 1914 ; 
George Peabody College for Teachers, 1916-19. St. Mary's, 1912 — ) 

LEAH AUGUSTA DENNIS English 

(A.B., Northwestern University, 1913 ; A.M., 1914. Teacher in Grafton 
Hall, 1914; Southern College, Petersburg, Va., 1917-18. St. Mary's, 
1918 — ) 

MARY SEARLE Mathematics 

(B.S., Wellesley College, 1887. Teacher in Miss Hall's School, Baltimore, 
1S91-1900 ; The Arundell School, Baltimore, 1900-16 ; Sweet Briar Col- 
lege, 1916-19. St. Mary's, 1919 — ) 

GRACE EVANS ST. JOHN English 

(A.B., Barnard College, Columbia University, 1916. Teacher in Hardwicli 
Academy, Vt., 1916-17; Millville (N. J.) High School, 1917-18. St. 
Mary's, 1919 — ) 

ELIZABETH E. SHEARER French 

(A.B., Mount Holyoke College, 1896; graduate student, Columbia Univer- 
sity ; student in France and Italy ; Associate Member Archaeological So- 
ciety of America. Teacher in Brooklyn Heights Seminary, N. Y. ; Queens 
College, Charlotte, 1914-17; Shorter College, Ga., 1917-19. St. Mary's, 
1919 — ) 

LOULIE M. WILSON Latin 

(B.A., Sweet Briar College, 1912 ; student, Winthrop College, S. C, 1905- 
08; summer session, Columbia University, 1918. Teacher in St. Marga- 
ret's Hall, Boise, 1913-15; The Cathedral School, Orlando, Fla., 1916-17; 
St. Jeanne's School, Roanoke, Va., 1917-19. St. Mary's, 1919 — ) 

KATHERINE QUACKENBOS Spanish and French 

(A.B., Barnard College, 1917. St. Mary's, 1919 — ) 



St Mary's Bulletin 



FLORENCE C. DAVIS Elocution 

(B. O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; Elmira College; Posse Gym- 
nasium. St. Mary's, 1911 — ) 

AMAIE BIERCE Physical Director 

(Graduate The Savage School for Physical Education, New York City, 1916. 
Teacher Brerestead School, Lake George, 1916-17; Grantwood Hall, N. 
Y., 1917-18. St. Mary's, 1918—) 



MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

WILLIAM H. JONES, A. A. G. O., Director Piano, Organ, Voice, 

Theory 

(A.B., Trinity College N. C. ; Pupil in Berlin of Wilhelm Berger and Schir- 
ner in Piano, of Praulein Anderson in Voice, and of demons in Organ. 
Director of Music, Hampton College, and private teacher in Norfolk, 
1900-18; Organist and choirmaster in old St. Paul's, in St. Luke's and 
in the First Presbyterian Church, Norfolk, 1900-18. ; Y. M. C.A. Secre- 
tary overseas, 191S-19. St. Mary's, 1919 — ) 

MARTHA A. DO WD Piano, Theory, History of Music 

'.(Graduate of St. Mary's, 1884; pupil of Kuersteiner, Sophus Wiig, Albert 
Mack; of Edwin Parmer in New York, 1915. President N. C. Music 
Teacher's Association, 1916 St. Mary's, 1886 — ; Director of Music, 
1908-17) 

EBIE ROBERTS Piano 

(Pupil in Piano of James P. Brawley, Blinn Owen; in Harmony of John 
A. Simpson ; in Organ of Wade Brown ; Certificate in the Burroughs 
Method. Columbia University, Summer Session, 1916. Private 
teacher. St. Mary's, 1913 — ) 

GUSTAV HAGEDORN Violin 

(Pupil of Adolph Hahn and Leopold Lichtenberg; of Issay Barmas 
and Edgar Stillman Kelly, Berlin. Five years member of the Cin- 
cinnati Symphony Orchestra ; Professor of Violin, Orchestra Instru- 
ments, etc., Meredith College, 1906-15 ; Dean of the Meredith College 
School of Music, 1912-15. Director of Music, University of North 
Carolina Summer School, 1912 — ; President N. C. Music Teachers' 
Association, 1913-14. St. Mary's, 1916 — ) 

SUE KYLE SOUTHWICK Piano 

(Graduate New England Conservatory, 1918. Private teacher, Alvin and 
Galveston, Texas, 1911-17. St. Mary's, 1918 — ) 

Mrs. ELIZA SMEDES KNOX Piano 

(Graduate St. Mary's School. Pupil for two years of Theodore Kullak 
in Berlin, of Reinecke, Jadassohn and Zwintscher in Leipzig. St. 
Mary's, 1919 — ) ( ( 

fMARGUERITE WEBSTER GESNER Voice 

(Graduate New England Conservatory, 1919. St. Mary's, 1919 — ) 

*ELIZABETH KATHARINE MOREHARDT Voice 

(Graduate New England Conservatory. 1919. St. Mary's, 1920 — ) 



•J-First half-year. 
"Second half-year. 



8 St Mary's Bulletin 

ART DEPARTMENT 

CLARA I. FENNER, Director Drawing, Painting, Design, etc. 

(Graduate Maryland Institute School of Art and Design ; special stu- 
dent Pratt Institute, 1905; special student in Paris, 1907. Director 
of Art, St. Mary's, 1892-96; 1902 — ) 

EXPRESSION DEPARTMENT 

FLORENCE C. DAVIS, Director Elocution, Dramatic Art 

(B. O., Emerson College, Boston, 1906; E'lmira College [N. Y.] ; Posse 
Gymnasium, Boston ; pupil of Edith Herrick, Boston, summers 
1911-'13-'14 [Leland Powers Method]; private studio, Elmira; sub- 
stitute teacher, Miss Metcalf's School, Tarry town, 1908; teacher, 
Beidsville Seminary [N. C.J, 1909-'ll. Director of Expression. St. 
Mary's, 1911 — ) 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

LIZZIE H. LEE, Director Stenography, Typewriting, Bookkeeping 

(Director of the Department, 1896 — ) 



HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

GENEVIEVE LEGGETT Domestic Science, Domestic Art 

(Graduate Mechanics Institute, Rochester, N. T., Household Science Nor- 
mal Course, 1919. St. Mary's, 1919 — ) 



OFFICERS, 1920-1921 



Rev. WARREN W. WAY Rector 

Mrs. CHARLES E. PERKINS Lady Principal 

Miss KATE McKIMMON Special Supervisor 

Mrs. NANNIE H. MARRIOTT Dietitian 

Miss FLORENCE W. TALBOT Housekeeper 

Miss ANNIE ALEXANDER, R. N Matron of the Infirmary 

(Graduate of St. Vincent's Hospital, Norfolk, Va. ) 
Dr. A. W. KNOX School Physician 

ERNEST CRUIKSHANK Secretary and Business Manager 

Miss JULIET B. SUTTON Secretary to the Rector 

Miss ANNE NEAVE Office Secretary 




o 

Id 

X 

H 



FOREWORD 

IN THIS foreword it is the purpose to make clear to those 
who are interested some of the special advantages and 
characteristics of St. Mary's: its well earned prestige; its 
scholarship; its care for the health and well-being of the 
students ; and its influence on character building. 

St. Mary's is an old school. It has completed its seventy- 
eighth year, having been established by the Rev. Aldert 
Smedes, D. D., in 1842. Since 1897 it has been the 
property of the Episcopal Church in the two Carolinas. 
It is the largest, in the United States, of the boarding schools 
for young women maintained by the Episcopal Church, and 
is also one of the oldest. The love and respect of former 
students brings yearly many of their daughters, grand- 
daughters and in a few instances their great-granddaughters 
to their old school, and the devotion to St. Mary's ideals 
has potent influence now as at all times, in her long history. 

On the side of the educational work accomplished, St. 
Mary's prepares students for admission to Women's Colleges 
of the highest standard, and gives two years of advanced 
work in its Junior and Senior classes. Its curriculum affords 
a complete and well-rounded education for that large num- 
ber of young women who desire to do advanced work but do 
not care to take a full college standard A. B. course. 

Attention to the health of the students is of supreme im- 
portance at St. Mary's. It is the constant aim of all those 
in authority so to guard the girls as to prevent illness. The 
school has a modern infirmary with a matron, who is a 
graduate nurse, always in charge; a doctor makes daily visits 
to the School and is subject to call at any time; a directress 
of physical training examines each student, recommends 
such exercise as is needed in each individual case, and super- 



1 St. Mary's Bulletin 

vises all indoor and outdoor exercises and games with a view 
to proper and suitable physical development. 

The sanitary conditions are in every way of the best; the 
use of modern preventive methods is urged as, for instance, 
vaccination against typhoid fever and smallpox; parents 
are at once informed of any outbreak of disease; the city 
water is of excellent quality. Intelligent attention to all 
these matters for many years has resulted in a remarkable 
freedom from serious illness or from epidemic disease of any 
kind. 

Equal care is given to the safety of the students. No fire, 
of any kind, is used in any of the buildings occupied by 
students, except in the use of gas in the Home Economics 
Department. The fires for cooking and heating are in 
distant, separated buildings. Each building is equipped with 
fire extinguishers and fire escapes. In the main buildings 
there are two standpipes with continuous water pressure, 
hose long enough to reach to the farthest point, and with 
connection for the City Fire Department hose. 

St. Mary's has well won traditions for the refined and 
lady-like bearing of its students, a reputation which it is 
the privilege of the teachers of the present day to maintain. 
One of the first lessons that is learned by the new student is 
the fact that there are certain things which a St. Mary's 
girl may or may not do. The most impressive fact in the 
life of the school is the spiritual side, the development of 
high minded, good women. No building at St. Mary's 
endears itself quite so much to the girls as the old chapel, 
where for so many years the girls have met for daily morn- 
ing and evening prayer, imbibing unconsciously, perhaps, 
those aspirations for a higher, nobler life which result in 
developing and perfecting true womanhood. 



ST. MARY'S SCHOOL 

HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION 

ST. MARY'S SCHOOL was founded May 12th, 1842, 
by the Rev. Aldert Smedes, D. D. It was established 
as a church school for girls and was for thirty-six years 
the chosen work of the founder, of whose life work Bishop 
Atkinson said: "It is my deliberate judgment that Dr. 
Smedes accomplished more for the advancement of this 
Diocese (North Carolina), and for the promotion of the best 
interests of society in its limits, than any man who ever lived 
in it. 

The present location was first set apart as the site for an 
Episcopal school in 1832, when influential churchmen, carry- 
ing out a plan proposed by Bishop Ives, purchased the pres- 
ent "Grove" as a part of a tract of 160 acres, to be used in 
establishing a Church school for boys. First the East Rock 
House, then West Rock House and the Main Building now 
called Smedes' Hall, after the founder, were built for use 
in this boys' school. But the school, though it started out 
with great promise, proved unsuccessful and was closed; and 
the property passed back into private hands. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes, a New Yorker by birth and education, 
had given up parish work on account of a weak throat, and 
was conducting a successful girls' school in New York City 
when in 1842 Bishop Ives met him and laid before him the 
opportunity in his North Carolina diocese. The milder 
climate attracted Dr. Smedes; he determined on the effort; 
came to Raleigh with a corps of teachers; gave St. Mary's its 
name, and threw open its doors in May, 1842. 

From the first the school was a success, and for the re- 
mainder of his life Dr. Smedes allowed nothing to interrupt 
the work he had undertaken. During the years of the War 
between the States St. Mary's was at the same time school 



12 St. Mary's Bulletin 

and refuge for those driven from their homes. It is a tradi- 
tion of which her daughters are proud, that during those 
years of struggle her doors were ever open, and that at one 
time the family of the beloved President of the Confederacy 
was sheltered within her walls. 

On April 25, 1877, Dr. Smedes died, leaving St. Mary's 
to the care of his son, Rev. Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had been 
during his father's lifetime a teacher in the school. This 
trust was regarded as sacred, and for twenty-two years, in 
which he spared neither pains nor expense, Dr. Bennett 
Smedes carried on his father's work for education. 

During this eventful half-century, St. Mary's was in the 
truest sense a Church school, but it was a private enterprise. 
The work and the responsibility were dependent upon the 
energy of the Drs. Smedes. Permanence required that the 
school should have a corporate existence and be established 
on a surer foundation as a power for good, and in 1897 Dr. 
Bennett Smedes proposed to the Diocese of North Carolina 
that the Church should take charge of the school. 

The offer was accepted; the Church assumed responsibility, 
appointed Trustees, purchased the school equipment from 
Dr. Smedes and the real property from Mr. Cameron; and 
in the fall of 1897 a charter was granted by the General 
Assembly. 

By this act of the Assembly, and its later amendments, the 
present corporation — The Trustees of St. Mary's School — 
consisting of the Bishops of the Church in the Carolinas, 
and clerical and lay trustees from each diocese or district, 
was created. 

The Board of Trustees, by the terms of the charter, is em- 
powered "to receive and hold lands of any value which may 
be granted, sold, devised or otherwise conveyed to said cor- 
poration, and shall also be capable in law to take, receive and 
possess all moneys, goods and chattels of any value and to 



St. Mary's Bulletin 13 

any amount which may be given, sold or bequeathed to or 
for said corporation." 

The Church was without funds for the purchase of the 
school property, and the Trustees undertook a heavy debt 
in buying it, but the existence of this debt only slightly re- 
tarded the improvements which were made from year to year 
in the school buildings and equipment, and in May, 1906, 
this purchase debt was lifted and the School became the un- 
encumbered property of the Church in the Carolinas. 

Under this ownership there have been great improvements 
in new equipment and new buildings, made possible largely 
by the legacy of Miss Eleanor Clement, a former teacher, 
and by the present campaign for an Endowment Fund. 

Dr. Bennett Smedes, who had long wished for the disposi- 
tion of St. Mary's that was actually effected, continued as 
Rector after the Church assumed charge, until his death on 
February 22, 1899. He was succeeded by the Rev. Theo- 
dore Dubose Bratton, Rector of the Church of the Advent, 
Spartanburg, S. C, who administered the affairs of the School 
very successfully until he entered upon his duties as Bishop 
of Mississippi in the summer of 1903, when Rev. McNeely 
Dubose, Rector of Trinity Church, Asheville, N. C, became 
Rector. Under his devoted and loving care the School con- 
tinued its usefulness for four years until his resignation in 1 907, 
when Rev. George W. Lay, of St. Paul's School, Concord, 
N. H., took charge. His aggressive and active management 
for eleven years added greatly to the success of the School. 
The present Rector, Rev. Warren W. Way, formerly Rector 
of St. Luke's Church, Salisbury, N. C, began his duties in 
the summer of 1918. 

EDUCATIONAL POSITION 

During the life of the founder, St. Mary's was a high-class 
school for the general education of girls, the training being 



14 St Mary's Bulletin 

regulated by the needs and exigencies of the times. Pupils 
finished their training without "graduating." In 1879, under 
the second Rector, set courses were established, covering col- 
lege preparatory work without sacrificing the special features 
for which the School stands, and in May, 1 879, the first class 
was regularly graduated. 

By the provisions of the charter of 1897, the Faculty of 
St. Mary's, "with the advice and consent of the Board of 
Trustees, shall have the power to confer all such degrees and 
marks of distinction as are usually conferred by colleges and 
universities," and at the annual meeting in May, 1900, the 
Trustees determined to establish the "College." This "Col- 
lege Course" at St. Mary's covers the requirements for 
entrance to colleges of the highest standard, followed by 
two years of advanced work. 

While High School graduates enter the Freshman Class at 
St. Mary's, it is possible for most of them to complete the 
course in three years. In a few cases High School graduates 
have graduated in two years. The Junior and Senior courses 
are especially designed to give an advanced and well-rounded 
course to students who do not intend to enter any higher insti- 
tution of learning, and the Academic work is supplemented, 
for those who desire it, by courses in departments of Music, 
Art, Home Economics, Business and Expression. 

The organization, requirements and the courses of each of 
these departments are described at length in this catalogue. 

A graduate of St. Mary's receives a diploma; but no 
decree has ever been conferred, although that power is speci- 
fied in the charter. 

LOCATION 

Raleigh, the Capital of North Carolina, is very accessible. 
The Southern, the Seaboard Air Line and the Norfolk South- 
ern railroads give ready and rapid communication with 
points in all directions, with through Pullman service, for 



5/. Mary's Bulletin 1 5 

example, from New York, Philadelphia, Washington, Rich- 
mond, Norfolk, Asheville, Atlanta, Jacksonville and Savan- 
nah. Raleigh is especially well situated for all points in 
Florida, Georgia, the Carolinas, Virginia, and the Eastern 
Shore of Maryland and Delaware. 

Raleigh is situated on the eastern border of the 
elevated Piedmont belt, while a few miles to the east the 
broad level lands of the Atlantic Coast plain stretch out to 
the ocean. The city thus enjoys the double advantage of 
an elevation sufficient to insure a light, dry atmosphere and 
perfect drainage, and propinquity to the ocean sufficiently 
close to temper very perceptibly the severity of the winter 
climate. 

CAMPUS, BUILDINGS, AND GENERAL 
EQUIPMENT 

St. Mary's is situated on the highest elevation in the city, 
about a half-mile due west of the Capitol, surrounded by its 
twenty-four-acre grove of oak and pine, with a frontage of 
fourteen hundred feet on one of the most beautiful residence 
streets. The site is all that can be desired for convenience, 
health and beauty. The campus contains almost a mile of 
walks and driveways, with tennis courts and basket-ball 
grounds for outdoor exercise. 

THE BUILDINGS 

The buildings are fourteen in number, conveniently grouped 
and connected by covered ways in such a way that a student 
is always protected from the weather. They are heated by 
steam, lighted by electricity, and abundantly provided with 
fire escapes, fire extinguishers, and fire hose for fire protection. 

The central group of buildings is formed by the Main 
Building, remodeled in the summer of 1919 and now called 



16 St. Mary's Bulletin 

Smedes Hall, and two Wings, East and West, all three of 
brick, three and a half stories high. On the ground floor of 
Smedes Hall are the rooms of the Home Economics Depart- 
ment, and recitation rooms; on the first floor, the spacious 
parlor with its handsome portraits, and the School Room ; on 
the second floor, conveniently located, are the office and 
rooms of the Lady Principal, and a large lobby for students. 
The remainder of the building is devoted to rooms for students. 
East and West Wings have class rooms on the ground floor 
and students' rooms on the other floors. All students' rooms 
in all dormitory buildings are furnished with single beds, and 
have individual clothes closets. Trunks are stored in special 
trunk rooms. There are bath rooms on each floor. 

The East and West Rock buildings, of stone, are con- 
nected with the central group by covered ways. East Rock 
has the business offices, the Rector's office, the Post Office 
and the Teachers' Sitting Room on the ground floor, and 
students' rooms on the second floor. West Rock is given up 
entirely to rooms for students and teachers. 

Senior Hall, a two-story frame building of wood, contains 
rooms for teachers and for older students. 

Clement Hall, built from funds bequeathed by a former 
teacher, Miss Eleanor Clement, is a large brick building, 
forming one side of a proposed quadrangle back of Smedes 
Hall, with which it is connected by a covered way. On the 
ground floor is the Gymnasium 50 by 90 feet; on the floor 
above, the spacious, airy dining hall, capable of seating com- 
fortably three hundred people, with serving room, dietician's 
office, kitchen, store rooms, etc., at the rear. 

The Art Building, a two-story brick building, of Gothic 
design, has the Library and class rooms on the ground floor, 
and the spacious, well-lighted Art Studio, 26 by 64 feet, a 
Music Studio, and the Science Laboratory on the second 
floor. 




Mu Basket-ball Team, 1920-21 




Tennis Group on the Front Courts 



St. Mary's Bulletin 1 7 

The Eliza Battle Pittman Memorial Auditorium, immedi- 
ately east of the Art Building, was in large part provided 
through a bequest in the will of Mrs. Mary Eliza Pittman, 
of Tarboro, and is in memory of her daughter, formerly a 
student of St. Mary's. 

The Piano Practice Rooms, twenty in number, are located 
along a covered way connecting the other buildings with the 
Art Building. They add greatly to the effective work of the 
Music School, and are so located that the practising does not 
disturb the classes. 

The Chapel, designed by Upjohn, built in the early days 
of the School, and entirely rebuilt in 1905 through the efforts 
of the Alumnae, is cruciform in shape, and has over three 
hundred sittings. It is furnished with a pipe organ of two 
manuals and sixteen stops, a memorial gift of Mrs. Bennett 
Smedes. In it the services of the Church are held daily. 

The Infirmary, built in 1903, is the general hospital for 
ordinary cases of sickness. It contains two large wards, a pri- 
vate ward, rooms for the Matron, pantry, and bathroom. 
The Annex, a separate building, provides facilities for iso- 
lation in case of contagious disease. 

The steam heating system of the School was entirely reno- 
vated in the summer of 1919, and the Boiler House and 
Laundry, a separate building of several units apart from the 
other biuldings, contains the boiler room, the hot water plant, 
and the well-equipped steam laundry. 

The Rectory of St. Mary's was built in 1900 upon a 
beautiful site on the west side of the campus, and is occupied 
by the Rector's family. The Cottage, home of the Business 
Manager's family, is located to the east of the other buildings 
in the rear of the Auditorium. 

On the east side of the grove, entrely independent of the 
School, is the episcopal residence of the Diocese of North 
Carolina, "Ravenscroft." 



18 St Mary's Bulletin 

THE LIFE AT ST. MARY'S 

The aim of St. Mary's is to make the daily life of the stu- 
dents that of a well-regulated Christian household. The 
effort is to direct the physical, intellectual and moral develop- 
ment of the individual with all the care that love for young 
people and wisdom in controlling them render possible. 

The students are distributed, partly in accordance with age 
and classification, among the ten halls. Nearly all of the 
rooms are rooms for two, but there are a few single rooms, and 
some rooms for three. 

Each Hall is presided over by a teacher who acts as Hall 
Mother. The Hall Mothers have special opportunities for 
correcting the faults and for training the character of the 
students under their charge, and these opportunities have 
been used with marked results. 

The school hours are spent in recitation, in music practice, 
or in study in the Study Hall or Library, the more advanced 
students being allowed to study in their rooms. 

RECREATION PERIODS 

The latter part of the afternoon is free for recreation and 
exercise, and the students are encouraged to be as much as 
possible in the open air, and are also required to take some 
definite exercise daily. In addition to this exercise each stu- 
dent is required to take definite class instruction and practice 
in Physical Training twice a week from the Physical Di- 
rector. A special division is provided for those who are 
delicate or require some special treatment. 

A half-hour of recreation is enjoyed by the students before 
the evening study period, when they gather in the roomy 
Parlor, with its old associations and fine collection of old 
paintings, and enjoy dancing and other social diversions. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 19 

THE LIBRARY 

The Library, located in the Art Building, is the center of 
the literary life of the school. It contains three thousand 
volumes, including encyclopedias and reference works, and 
the leading current periodicals and papers. The Library is 
essentially a work room, and is open throughout the day, and 
to advanced students at night, offering every facility for use 
by the students; and their attention is called frequently to 
the importance of making constant and careful use of its 
resources. 

CHAPEL SERVICES 

The Chapel is the soul of St. Mary's, and twice daily 
teachers and students gather there on a common footing. 
During the session the religious exercises are conducted very 
much as in any well-ordered congregation. As St. Mary's 
is distinctly a Church school, all resident students are required 
to attend the daily services and also those on Sunday. Regular 
non-resident students are only required to attend the morn- 
ing services, and only on the days when recitations are held. 

The systematic study of the Bible is a regular part of the 
school course, and in addition, on Sunday morning the resi- 
dent students spend a half-hour in religious instruction. 

CARE OF HEALTH 

Whenever a student is so indisposed as to be unable to 
attend to her duties or to go to the dining hall, she is required 
to go to the Infirmary, where she is removed from the noise 
of the student life and may receive special attention away 
from contact with the other students. The matron of the 
Infirmary has general care of the health of the students and 
endeavors to win them by personal influence to such habits 
of life as will prevent breakdowns and help them overcome 
any tendency to sickness. 



20 St. Mary's Bulletin 

The employment of a School Physician enables the School 
to keep very close supervision over the health of the students. 
The ordinary attendance of the physician and such small 
doses as students need from time to time are included in the 
general charge. This arrangement leaves the School free to 
call in the Physician, at any time, and thus in many cases to 
use preventive measures, when under other circumstances un- 
willingness to send for the doctor might cause delay and result 
in more serious illness. The general health of the School for 
many years past has been remarkable. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

The spiritual and mental are undoubtedly of higher ulti- 
mate importance than the physical, but physical welfare 
is fundamentally of first importance. Every effort has 
therefore been made at St. Mary's to secure the best phy- 
sical development and the highest grade of physical health. 
The very best teaching and the greatest efforts of the stu- 
dent will be of no avail if the physical health is poor, and, 
what is of more importance, the best education that one 
can obtain will be comparatively useless in later years, unless 
one has secured good physical development, good physical 
habits and a robust condition of general health. 

The Physical Director devotes herself entirely to Physical 
Training and is thoroughly prepared to get good results 
from this department of the school life. 

The Gymnasium is well equipped, and the Physical Exer- 
cises are arranged with a large scope, which is producing 
increasingly better results. The exercises when possible 
are taken out of doors, but some of them are conducted in 
the gymnasium for the purpose of exercise in special lines 
suited to each individual student. A careful record is kept 
of the measurements and strength in certain particulars of 
each student, and reports indicating the changes in these 



St. Mary's Bulletin 21 

matters are sent to the parents twice a year. This enables 
the parents to see what progress has been made, and also 
tends to increase the interest of the students themselves in 
the physical development which they ought to cultivate. 



THE SCHOOL WORK 

The School Year is divided into two terms of seventeen 
school weeks each. Each term is again divided into two 
"quarters." This division is made to assist in grading the 
progress of the student. Reports are mailed monthly. 

It is required that each student shall be present at the 
beginning of the session, and that her attendance shall be 
regular and punctual to the end. Sickness or other unavoid- 
able cause is the only excuse accepted for non-attendance or 
tardiness. The amount of work to be done, and the fact 
that it must be done within the time planned, makes this 
rule necessary to the progress of the student in her course. 

Absence at the beginning of the session retards the proper 
work of the class, and is therefore unfair to the School as a 
whole. 

THE INTELLECTUAL TRAINING 

Particular attention is given to the development of those 
intellectual habits that produce the maximum of efficiency. 
The student is expected to work independently, and grad- 
ually to strengthen the habit of ready, concentrated and 
sustained attention in all her thinking processes. Clearness, 
facility and ease in the expression of thought, oral and writ- 
ten, are carefully cultivated. Every effort is made to de- 
velop the best mental habits through every detail of admin- 
istration which bears upon the intellectual life, whether it be 
the recitation, the study hour, the individual help, or some 
other feature of the School management. 

LECTURES AND RECITALS 

Among the important elements in the intellectual life of St. 
Mary's are the occasional lectures, which have been of much 
value to the students, and are intended to be a feature of the 



St. Mary's Bulletin 23 

school life. In addition, there are given at stated times re- 
citals by visiting artists, by the Musical Faculty, and by the 
students of the Music Department. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

While the regular duties at St. Mary's leave few idle mo- 
ments for the students, they find time for membership in 
various organizations, conducted by them under more or less 
direct supervision from the School, from which they derive 
much pleasure and profit. These organizations are intended 
to supplement the regular duties and to lend help in the 
development of different sides of the student life. All quali- 
fied students are advised, as far as possible, to take an active 
part in them. 

THE WOMAN'S AUXILIARY 

The missionary interests of the School, as a whole, are 
supplemented by the work of the branches of the Auxiliary. 
The Senior branch is made up of members of the Faculty; 
the students make up eight Chapters of the Junior Auxiliary, 
each Chapter being directed by a teacher chosen by its mem- 
bers. These Chapters are known respectively as St. Anne's, 
St. Catherine's, St. Elizabeth's, St. Margaret's, St. Monica's, 
St. Agnes', Lucy Bratton, and Kate McKimmon. 

The work of the individual Chapters varies somewhat from 
year to year, but they jointly maintain regularly The Aldert 
Smedes Scholarship in St. Mary's School, Shanghai, The 
Bennett Smedes Scholarship in the Thompson Orphanage, 
Charlotte, a Bible Woman in China, and other beneficent 
work. 

THE ALTAR GUILD 

The Altar Guild has charge of the altar and the decora- 
tion of the Chapel. 



24 5/. Mary's Bulletin 

THE LITERARY SOCIETIES 

The work of the two Literary Societies — the Sigma 
Lambda and the Epsilon Alpha Pi — which meet on Tues- 
day evenings, does much to stimulate the intellectual life. 
The societies take their names from the Greek letters form- 
ing the initials of the Southern poets — Sidney Lanier and 
Edgar Allan Poe. The annual inter-society debates are 
a feature of the school life. Both resident and local students 
are eligible to membership in these societies. 

THE MUSE CLUB 

The students publish monthly a school magazine, The St. 
Mary's Muse, with the news of the School and its alumnae, 
and issue annually a year book, The Muse, with the photo- 
graphs, illustrations, etc., that make it a valued souvenir. 

The Muse Club is organized for encouraging contributions 
to these publications, and supplementing the regular class 
work and the work of the literary societies, and holds its 
meetings weekly. 

THE SKETCH CLUB 

The Sketch Club is under the supervision of the Art De- 
partment. Frequent excursions are made during the pleas- 
ant fall and spring weather for the purpose of sketching from 
nature, etc. 

THE DRAMATIC CLUB 

The Dramatic Club is under the supervision of the Expres- 
sion Department. Opportunity is afforded for simple general 
training that is frequently valuable in teaching poise, enun- 
ciation, and expression, while care is taken not to allow any 
exaggeration. 

Members of the Club present annually one or more simple 
dramas. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 25 



MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The Choir, the Chorus, and the Sight Singing Class afford 
students, both in and out of the Music Department, oppor- 
tunity to develop their musical talent under very agreeable 
conditions. 

ATHLETIC CLUBS 

In addition to the regular instruction given by a compe- 
tent teacher, the students, with advisers from the Faculty, 
have two voluntary athletic associations, the object of which 
is to foster interest in out-of-door sports. These associations 
are known respectively as Sigma and Mu, from the initials 
of St. Mary's. 

The associations have tennis tournaments, basket-ball, 
volley-ball, and captain-ball teams, and inter-association 
meets. Every girl has an opportunity to play on some team. 
Letters are awarded to the best players in tennis, basket-ball 
and volley-ball. 

THE SCHOOL COUNCIL 

The School Council is composed of members of the Faculty 
and representatives of the various classes and meets from time 
to time to confer upon matters of general interest, discipline, 
etc. 

The Council has been already of benefit and it is hoped 
it will contribute still more largely in future to good under- 
standing, loyalty and content. 



WORK OF THE DEPARTMENTS 

ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT 
I. The Preparatory School; II. The "College" 

I. THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

The Preparatory School covers the first two years (9th 
and 10th grades) of a High School of the highest standard. 

The two years of the Preparatory School and the first two 
years of the "College" cover the work of the best High 
Schools, and the courses are numbered for convenience A, 
B, C and D. (See pages 43 et seq.) These four years, 
with courses properly chosen, should prepare the student for 
entrance into the most advanced standard colleges. 

The course in the Preparatory School is closely prescribed, 
and each student is expected to adhere to it. 

Admission to the Preparatory School is allowed provision- 
ally on certificate without examination; but candidates are 
advised also to take such examinations as are necessary. 

At entrance every student is expected to select some definite 
course, and afterwards to keep to it. This course, when once 
agreed on, cannot be changed after entrance without the 
parent's consent. This requirement is not intended to hinder 
those who, coming to take a special course in Music, Art, 
Business, or Home Economics, desire to occupy their spare 
time profitably in some one or more of the courses of the 
"College." 

II. THE "COLLEGE" 

The first two years of the present "College" course are in- 
tended to complete the work of a first-class high school, and 
the student is limited in well-defined lines and not permitted 
to specialize or take elective work except within narrow limits ; 



St. Mary's Bulletin 27 

in the last two years the courses are conducted on college lines, 
and the student, under advice, is permitted in large measure 
to elect the lines of work best suited to her taste and ability. 

The course at St. Mary's is of a type that has been given 
by many of the higher institutions for the education of 
women in the South, and is the one suited to the need of the 
large majority of students. It is therefore designed to be 
complete in itself. 

At the same time those who desire to enter some higher 
institution after graduation from St. Mary's can be prepared 
to do so. Such students should note carefully that to attain 
the desired end they must give notice of their intention and 
of the college to which they wish to go at the beginning of 
their Freshman year: their courses must be selected with a 
view to the requirements of the college to which they wish 
to go; and they should take the necessary examinations for 
entrance and advanced standing in that college each year as 
they are prepared in the various subjects. The course 
that might lead to the award of a diploma at St. Mary's 
might not cover the subjects necessary for entrance or for 
advanced standing in any given college of higher grade. 

Students are urged, wherever possible, to obtain certifi- 
cates of work done, before the close of the school year. 



28 5/. Mary's Bulletin 

THE REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION TO 

THE FRESHMAN CLASS OF ST. MARY'S 

SCHOOL 

In order to be admitted to the Freshman Class of the "Col- 
lege" the student must meet the requirements outlined below 
in English, History, Mathematics, Science and one foreign 
language — five subjects in all. If two foreign languages are 
offered Science may be omitted. 

A student admitted in four of the required subjects will 
be admitted as a Conditioned Freshman. 

English and Literature. — A good working knowledge 
of the principles of English Grammar as set forth in such 
works as Buehler's Modern Grammar, with special attention 
to the analysis and construction of the English sentence. 

Knowledge of elementary Rhetoric and Composition as set 
forth in such works as Scott & Denney's Elementary English 
Composition, or Hitchcock's Exercises in English Composition. 

Candidates are expected to have had at least two years' 
training in general compostion (themes, letter writing and 
dictation). 

Subjects for composition may be drawn from the following 
works, which the pupil is expected to have studied: Long- 
fellow's Evangeline and Courtship of Miles Siandish (or 
Tales of a Wayside Inn) ; selections from Irving's Sketch 
Book (°r Irving's Tales of a Traveler) ; Hawthorne's Twice 
Told Tales, Scott's Ivanhoe and George Eliot's Silas Marner. 

Mathematics. — Arithmetic complete, with special atten- 
tion to the principles of percentage and interest. Element- 
ary Algebra complete and Advanced Algebra through 
Quadratic Equations. 

History. — The History of the United States complete as 
laid down in a good high school text; the essential facts of 



St. Mary's Bulletin 29 

English History; the essential facts of Greek and Roman 
History. 

Latin. — A sound knowledge of the forms of the Latin 
noun, pronoun and verb, and a knowledge of the elementary 
rules of syntax and composition as laid down in a standard 
first-year book and beginner's composition (such as Smith's 
Latin Lessons and Bennett's Latin Composition). The first 
four books of Caesar's Gallic War. 

French or Spanish. — A first-year course leading to the 
knowledge of the elements of the grammar and the ability to 
read simple prose. 

Science. — The essential facts of Physical Geography and 
Hygiene as laid down in such texts as Tarr's Physical Geog- 
raphy and Fisher's How to Live. 

ADMISSION 

(a) ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 

Admission to the Freshman Class may be either by cer- 
tificate or by examination, and it is preferred that the 
candidate both submit a Certificate of her past work and 
also take the examinations for entrance. 

Certificates alone are, however, accepted provisionally for 
entrance from all institutions known to St. Mary's to be of 
the proper standard. Such certificates should be full and 
explicit, and must state specifically that the work has been 
well done, and enumerate text-books, amounts covered, the 
length of recitation and time spent on each subject, the 
grades, etc. 

Certificates should whenever possible be secured before the 
close of the School year preceding entrance. 

(b) ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STUDIES 
In order to be admitted to work higher than that of the 
Freshman Class in any given subject, the student must pre- 



30 St. Mary's Bulletin 

sent certificates of having completed satisfactorily the pre- 
vious work in that subject, and must satisfy the head of the 
department of her ability to do such advanced work. 

CERTIFICATE CREDIT 

(a) FOR ADMISSION TO THE FRESHMAN CLASS 
Certificates when accepted are credited conditionally at 
their face value. The student is placed in the classes which 
her certificate gives her the right to enter and is then ex- 
pected to show her fitness for these classes by satisfactory 
work in them. If her work during the first month is un- 
satisfactory she may be required to enter the next lower class 
or may be given further trial. If her work during the second 
month is satisfactory she is given regular standing in the 
class; if it is unsatisfactory she is required to enter the 
lower class. 

(b) FOR ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 
(1) CONDITIONAL CREDIT 

Though it is urged that students be examined for ad- 
vanced classes and thus obtain full credit at once, con- 
ditional credit is given on the certificate of schools of entirely 
equivalent standard. For this conditional credit full credit 
in each subject is given when the student has successfully 
passed an examination in such subject, or, in certain sub- 
jects after she has obtained credit for advanced work in 
that subject. The amount of such credit can in no case 
exceed the amount of credit earned at St. Mary's. 

For example, a student entering English M (Junior English) by cer- 
tificate would be given conditional credit for English C (Freshman English — 
4 points) and English D (Sophomore English — 4 points). She receives four 
points credit for the successful completion of English M, and is then given 
full credit for four points of the conditional credit. The completion of Eng- 
lish N (Senior English — 4 points) would give her full credit for the 
remaining four points of conditional credit, so that upon completion of 
English M she would be credited with 8 points in English, and upon com- 
pletion of English N she would have 16 points to her credit. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 31 

For conditional credit in History, Science and Algebra 
full credit can be obtained only by examination, since the 
work of the higher classes does not fully test the character 
of the work in the lower classes. 

(2) FULL CREDIT 

(a) Full credit is given at once on entrance for each sub- 
ject when the student presents evidence by certificate of 
having successfully done the work required by St. Mary's 
in that subject and also passes an examination in the subject. 

(b) Full credit is given for conditional credit as men- 
tioned in the preceding page. 

(c) While St. Mary's accepts certificates for entrance 
unconditionally, it is obvious that credit for work in the 
"College" stands on a different footing from that for prepara- 
tion for entrance, since such credit would count on the 
60 points for which St. Mary's gives its diploma. It is 
impossible to maintain the value of the St. Mary's diploma 
unless all the work of the four years is tested by the School 
itself or by some standard authority generally recognized. 
The Association of Colleges and Preparatory Schools of the 
Southern States seems to supply this authority. 

St. Mary's therefore accepts for full credit for advanced 
standing certificates from the schools accredited by this Asso- 
ciation which state that the candidate has completed satis- 
factorily in accordance with the specified requirements of 
St. Mary's the required work in Foreign Language, Mathe- 
matics, History, English and Science. 

EXAMINATIONS FOR ENTRANCE 

Candidates for admission will, as a rule, be examined 
to determine their proper classification. 

Specimen examination questions in any subject will be 
furnished on request; and principals who are preparing stu- 



32 St. Mary's Bulletin 

dents for St. Mary's will be furnished the regular examina- 
tion papers at the regular times, in January and May, if 
desired. 

Certificates are urgently desired in all cases, whether the 
candidate is to be examined or not. 

REGULAR COURSE 

All students are advised to take a regular prescribed course 
and to keep to it; a changing about from one subject to an- 
other, with no definite aim in view, is unsatisfactory alike to 
student, parent and the School. Parents are urged to advise 
with the Rector as to a course for their daughters, and help 
in this matter is given by him or his representatives to the 
student throughout her course. 

SPECIAL COURSES 

Those who desire to take academic work while specializing 
in the Departments of Music, Art, Expression or Business 
are permitted to do so and are assigned to such classes in the 
Academic Department as suit their purpose and preparation. 
The number of hours of academic work, along with the time 
spent on the special subjects, should be sufficient to keep the 
student well occupied. 

TERM EXAMINATIONS AND MARKING 

The School Year at St. Mary's is divided into two half- 
years (the Advent and Easter Terms), and each term is 
again sub-divided into two Quarters of two months each. 
Reports are sent out at the end of each month showing the 
marks obtained in each subject, and examinations are held 
in all subjects at the end of each half-year. 

The mark for the term in each subject is obtained by adding 
the two quarter-marks and the examination mark and 




The Sophomore Class at the East Rock Covered-way- 




1919 Seniors with the "Daisy Chain" on "Class Day. 



St Mary's Bulletin 33 

dividing by three. Examinations are regarded by the School 
as of the highest importance, not only as a test, but as an 
essential part of education. At the same time it will be 
observed that it is possible to overcome a slight deficiency 
in the examination mark by a better mark for daily recitation, 
when the average is taken. 

The "passing mark" is 75%. The "honor mark" is 90%. 

CLASSIFICATION 

In order to graduate and receive the School diploma a 
student of the "College" must receive credit for 60 points 
of "College" work, of which 48 points are in specified sub- 
jects. All students of the "College," whether expecting to 
graduate or not, are classified in one of the "College" classes 
according to the amount of their full credits for work in the 
"College" course. 

The classification is made on the following basis: 

A student to be ranked as a member of the "College" must 
have been admitted to the Freshman Class without more 
than one condition. 

If admitted with one condition, the student is ranked as 
a Conditioned Freshman, and no student is advanced to a 
higher class until all entrance conditions are passed off. 

If admitted without condition she is ranked as a Freshman. 

A student with 15 points of full credit is ranked as a 
Sophomore. 

A student with 30 points of full credit is ranked as a Junior. 

A student with 42 points of full credit is ranked as a Senior, 
provided that she takes that year, with the approval of the 
School, sufficient points counting toward her graduation to 
make the 60 points necessary and has passed off all con- 
ditions on work previous to the Junior Year, and also pro- 
vided that no student can be ranked as a Senior or con- 



34 St Mary's Bulletin 

sidered as a candidate for graduation in any year unless 
she has passed all examinations on previous subjects needed 
for graduation. 

A student entitled to be ranked in any way with a given class under the 
above conditions must also take work sufficient to give her the prospect 
of obtaining enough points during the year to entitle her to enter the next 
higher class the following year. 



GRADUATION 

The course leading to graduation from the College is out- 
lined later in stating the work of each year. The course is 
closely prescribed during the first two years (through the 
Sophomore year). In the last two years the student is 
allowed a broad choice of electives. 

The requirements for graduation may be briefly summed 
up as follows: 

(1) The candidate must have been a student in the department during 
at least one entire school year. 

(2) The candidate must have earned at least 60 points, of which 48 
points must be in the following subjects: 

English: 12 points. 
Mathematics: 5 points. 
History: 6 points. 
Science: 4 points. 
"Philosophy" : 6 points. 

Foreign Languages (Latin, French, German or Spanish in any com- 
bination) 15 points. 

(3) Not more than 20 points will be counted for class work in any one 
year; not more than 15 points will be counted altogether in any one subject 
(Latin, French, German and Spanish being considered as separate subjects), 
and not more than 12 points will be counted for technical work done in the 
Departments of Music, Art, Expression, or Home Economics. 

((4) The candidate must have made up satisfactorily any and all work, 
in which she may have been "conditioned" at least one year before the 
date at which she wishes to graduate. 

(5) The candidate must have made formal written announcement of her 
candidacy for graduation during the first quarter of the year in which the 



St. Mary's Bulletin 35 

diploma is to be awarded; and her candidacy must have been then passed 
upon favorably by the Rector. 

(6) The candidate must have satisfactorily completed all "general 
courses" which may have been prescribed; must have maintained a satisfac- 
tory deportment; and must have borne herself in such a way as a student 
as would warrant the authorities in giving her the mark of the School's 
approval. 

THE AWARDS 

The St. Mary's Diploma is awarded a student who has 
successfully completed the full academic course required for 
graduation as indicated above. 

An Academic Certificate is awarded to students who 
receive a Certificate or Diploma in Music, Art or Expression, 
on the conditions laid down for graduation from the College, 
except that 

(1) The minimum number of points of academic credit required is 35 
points, instead of 60 points. 

(2) These points are counted for any strictly academic work in the 
College. 

(3) No technical or theoretical work in Music, Art or Expression will 
be credited toward these 35 points. 

No honors will be awarded and no certificates of dismissal 
to other institutions will be given, until all bills have been 
satisfactorily settled. 

COLLEGE ENTRANCE CERTIFICATE 

A Certificate stating that a student is considered to have 
done satisfactorily the work required for college entrance 
will be given to such students as shall have completed the 
proper units of work in a manner satisfactory to the authori- 
ties of St. Mary's. 

To receive this certificate the candidate must have been 
for two years at St. Mary's School, must have given one 
year's notice of her candidacy, and aside from her scholastic 



36 St Mary's Bulletin 

record must be considered properly qualified in general by 
the Faculty. 

In order to receive this Certificate the candidate must also 
in each subject (1) pass each examination covered by the 
work required; (2) have an average for each year of 80%; 
and (3) be recommended by the head of the department. 

The student must have completed \AYz units of college 
entrance work, as follows : 

English: 3 units. 

Mathematics: 2J/2 units. 

History : 2 units. 

Science : 1 unit. 

Latin : 4 units. 

French (or) German (or) Spanish: 2 units. 

AWARDS IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

For academic requirements for certificates or diplomas in 
Music, Art, Expression or Home Economics, see under those 
departments, but candidates must in each case, in addition 
to all technical requirements, have completed at least the 
"Minimum of Academic Work" stated on page 37. 

COMMENCEMENT HONORS 

Honors at graduation are based on the work of the last 
two years. 

The Valedictorian has the first honor; the Salutatorian 
has the second honor. The Essayist is chosen on the basis 
of the final essays submitted. 

THE HONOR ROLL 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members 
of the School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commence- 
ment. The requirements are: 

(1) The student must have been in attendance the entire session and 
have been absent from no duty at any time during the session without the 
full consent of the Rector, and without lawful excuse. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 37 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course of study or 
its equivalent, and must have carried this work to successful completion, 
taking all required examinations and obtaining a mark for the year in each 
subject of at least 75 per cent. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good" (90 per cent.), 
or better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less than two demerits) 
in Deportment, in Industry, and in Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing in the 
affairs of her school life during the year. 



THE NILES MEDAL 

The Niles Medal for Highest Average was instituted in 
1906, by Rev. Charles Martin Niles, D. D., who died in 
1918, and is continued by his widow. It is awarded to the 
student who has made the best record in scholarship during 
the session. 

The medal is awarded to the same student only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are: 

(1) The student must have taken throughout the year at least "15 
points" of regular work; and have satisfactorily completed this work, pass- 
ing all required examinations. 

(2) She must have been "Excellent" in Deportment. 

(3) She must have taken all regular general courses assigned and have 
done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) She must be a regular student of the College Department. 

GENERAL STATEMENTS 

^HE MINIMUM OF ACADEMIC WORK REQUIRED FOR 
CERTIFICATES 

Candidates for Certificates in the Music Department, the 
Art Department, the Expression Department, or in the De- 
partment of Home Economics, must have full credit for the 
following minimum of academic work. 

(1) The A and B Courses in English, History, Mathematics, Science, and 
in either Latin or French or German or Spanish. 



38 5/. Mary's Bulletin 

(2) The C and D Courses in English. 

(3) Such other "College" Courses as will amount to "twelve points" of 
Academic credit. 

These "12 points" may be earned in English, 
History, Mathematics, Science, Latin, French, Spanish or 
"Philosophy." 

ACADEMIC CREDITS FOR WORK IN OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

The completion at St. Mary's of the theoretical and tech- 
nical work in the Freshman, Sophomore, Junior or Senior 
classes in Music entitles the student to 3 points of academic 
credit for the work of each class, and a like credit is offered 
in the Departments of Art and Expression. (Only 3 points, 
however, may be obtained in any one year.) 

One point of academic credit is given for the completion of 
Theory 3, 4 or 5. 

Students completing the work of Home Economics A I. 
or A II. receive 2 points of Academic credit. 



THE REGULAR ACADEMIC WORK 

THE PREPARATORY SCHOOL COURSE 

For details in each subject see page 43. 

The letter given with each subject is the name of the course. The number 
indicates the number of hours of weekly recitation. 

First Year Second Year 

English A, 4 English B, 4 

Mathematics A, 4 History B, 4 

Science A, 4 Mathematics B, 4 

Latin A, 4 Latin B, 4 

(or) 
French I, 4 

All students are also required to take Bible Study, Drawing, Reading 
and Physical Culture. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 39 

THE "COLLEGE" WORK 

In the "College" work the letter given with each subject is the name of the 
course, and the number gives the number of points for the course, which 
ordinarily is the same as the number of hours of weekly recitations. 

It should be remembered that 60 points of credit are required for grad- 
uation from the "College," and that 48 points of this 60 points are in required 
subjects, as follows: (see also page 34). 

English: 12 points (that is, Courses C and D; and either M or N). 

History: 6 points (that is, Courses C or D; and either M or N). 

Mathematics: 5 points (that is, Course C). 

Science: 4 points. 

"Philosophy": 6 points. 

Foreign Languages: Latin, or French, or Spanish: 15 points (in any 
combination) . 

The other 12 points are entirely elective. Music or Art may count 3 points 
each year or 12 points in all, or the 12 points may be elected from any C, D, 
M, or N Course in the College. 

Pedagogy, (2) or Home Economics A I or A II, (2) may be elected and 
counted for credit. 

Art History, Theory of Music 3, 4 or 5 may be elected, with a credit of 1 
point each. 



THE COLLEGE PREPARATORY COURSE 

The completion of this course, under the conditions stated on page 35, 
will entitle the student to the College Entrance Certificate. 

FIRST YEAR ("A") SECOND YEAR ("B") 

Hours Unit Hours Unit 

English A 4 . . English B 4 1 

History B 4 1 History C 4 I 

Mathematics A 4 Y 2 Mathematics B 4 1 

Latin A 4 1 Latin B 4 I 

THIRD YEAR ("C") FOURTH YEAR ("D") 

Hours Unit Hours Unit 

English C ........ 4 I English D 4 1 

Mathematics C 4 I Science D 4 1 

Latin C 4 1 Latin D 4 1 

French I 4 I French II 4 1 

(or) (or) 

Spanish I 4 1 Spanish II 4 I 



40 



St. Mary's Bulletin 



THE "COLLEGE" COURSE 



FRESHMAN YEAR 
English C, 4 
Mathmatics C, 4 
History C, 4 
Science C, 4 
Latin C, 4 

(or) 
French II, 4 

(or) 
Spanish II, 4 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 
English D, 4 
Mathematics D, 3 
History D, 4 
Science D, 4 
Latin D, 4 

(or) 
French III, 4 

(or) 
Spanish III, 4 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

At least one foreign language is required. 

An hour of Bible Study and a period each of Spelling and Reading 
weekly is required. 

The regular course in Music or Art may be taken as an additional 
subject for credit (3 points). 

Not less than 16 points nor more than 20 points should be taken. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

The foreign language elected in the Freshman Year should be continued. 
An hour each of Bible Study and Current History and a period of 
Spelling weekly is required. 

The regular course in Music, Expression or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 



JUNIOR YEAR 

English M, 4 
Philosophy M, 2 
History M, 2 
Latin M, 3 
French M, 2 
Mathematics M, 3 



SENIOR YEAR 



English N, 4 
Philosophy Na, 2 
Philosophy Nb, 2 
Latin N, 3 
French N, 2 
History N, 2 
Mathematics N, 2 



JUNIOR YEAR 

Enough work in foreign language should be elected to count at least 4 
points. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History is required. 

The regular course in Music, Expression or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 




a 



. 



5/. Mar^s Bulletin 41 



SENIOR YEAR 

Enough foreign language must be taken to complete at least the 15 points 
required for graduation. 

An hour each of Bible Study and Current History is required. 
English N is required unless 12 points have already been earned in English. 
History N is required unless 6 points have already been earned in History. 

The regular course in Music, Expression or Art may be taken as a subject 
for credit (3 points). 

GENERAL NOTES 

(1) The Theoretical courses in Music and Art may be counted as 
elective in any "college" class, and the technical work of the proper grade 
in either Music, Art or Expression may be counted in any "college" class as 
an elective for three points. But only one subject may be so counted. 

(2) Failure in the Bible course for any year will deprive the student cf 
one of the points gained in other subjects. 



GENERAL COURSES 

The theory of St. Mary's being that a well-rounded edu- 
cation results in a developing of the best type of Christian 
womanhood, certain general courses as outlined below have 
been prescribed for all students. 

ENGLISH 

An hour each week is devoted to training all students, 
except Juniors and Seniors, in the art of clear, forceful, intel- 
ligent reading, and in the practice of spelling and letter- 
writing. 

CURRENT HISTORY 

Students of the Senior, Junior and Sophomore years meet 
once a week for the discussion of current topics. This exer- 
cise is intended to lead to an intelligent knowledge of current 
events and to emphasize the importance of such knowledge 
in later life for intelligent conversation. 



42 St. Mary's Bulletin 

BIBLE STUDY 

All students are required to take the prescribed course in 
Bible Study, which is given one hour a week. It is intended 
to afford a knowledge of the contents, history and litera- 
ture of the English Bible, and with a view, in the case of the 
older students, to help them as Sunday School teachers. 

PHYSICAL TRAINING 

All students not excused on the ground of health are re- 
quired to take exercises in physical training. (See also 
page 80.) 

RED CROSS LECTURES 

During the year 1920-21 a course of fifteen lectures by 
a competent instructor will be given in First Aid to the In- 
jured. The fulfillment of the requirements of this special 
course will entitle the student to the Red Cross Certificate in 
First Aid. 



THE COURSES IN DETAIL 

GENERAL STATEMENTS 

The courses are here lettered systematically. It is import- 
ant to note and consider the letter of the course in deter- 
mining credits or planning a student's work. 

"A" Courses are the lowest regular courses, and are taken in the First 
Year of the Preparatory School. 

"B" Courses are taken in the Second Year of the Preparatory School. 

The "A" and "B" Courses in English, History, Mathematics and Science 
and one foreign language (or their equivalents) must have been finished 
satisfactorily by a student before she is eligible for admission to the College. 

"C" and "D" Courses are taken ordinarily in the Freshman and Sopho- 
more years. In English, Mathematics, Latin, French and Spanish the 
preceding Course must be taken before the student can enter the more ad- 
vanced Course. 

"M" and "N" Courses are ordinarily taken in the Junior or Senior years. 
Students are not eligible to take these courses until they have finished the 
"C" and "D" Courses of the same subjects. (See special exceptions before 
each subject.) 

"X" Courses are special courses not counting toward graduation. 

HISTORY 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 6 points in History. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week throughout the year. An- 
cient History.. (I) First half-year: Greece; (2) Sec- 
ond half-year: Rome. The course in Ancient History 
makes a thorough study of the ancient world. The student 
is sufficiently drilled in map work to have a working knowl- 
edge of the ancient world ; the influence of some of the great 
men is emphasized by papers based on outside reading, for 
instance: Plutarch's Lives. Selections from Homer are read 
in class. 

Breasted, Ancient Times; McKinley, Stud}; Outline in Greek a **d Roman 
History. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week throughout the year (4 
points). English History. In this course emphasis is laid 



44 St. Mary's Bulletin 

on the development of constitutional government, particu- 
larly with its bearing on United States History. The Mc- 
Kinley Note Books are used for map work. From time to 
time papers are required on important events and great men. 

Andrews, Short History of England. Reference work. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week throughout the year. (4 
points.) American History. The text -book gives a clear and 
fair treatment of the causes leading to our war with Great 
Britain; to the War Between the States; and of present day 
questions, political, social and economic. 

Adams and Trent, History of the United Stales. 

Course M. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Medieval His- 
tory. In Medieval and Modern History the student is given 
a clear view of the development of feudalism; of monarchic 
states; of the history of the Christian Church; of the Refor- 
mation; of the growth of democracy, and of the great politi- 
cal, social and religious questions of the present day, with 
some special reference work in the library. 

West, Modern History; Robinson's Readings. 

Course N. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Modern His- 
tory. A continuation of Course M. Same methods. 

Robinson and Beard, The Development of Modern Europe, Vol. II. 
Seignobos, Hayes and other reference works. 

THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

All students at entrance are required to stand a written test to determine 
general knowledge of written English. , 

Courses A and B are Preparatory and the knowledge obtained in 
them is required before a student can enter a higher course. 

Candidates for graduation must take Courses C and D and at least 4 
points from Courses M and N. 

Course A. — 4 hours a week. (1) Literature: t&e rapid 
reading of stories for main points of plot and character; 
word by word reading of several short poems for vocabulary, 
use and definition of words; memorizing of poetry. Read- 
ing list provided. (2) Composition: narratives, explanations, 



St. Mary's Bulletin 45 

letters; subjects drawn chiefly from observation of processes 
and scenes, from work in and out of school and books. Oral 
work: reproduction of stories and poems; reports on individual 
work. 

Scott and Denney, Elementary Composition; the Odyssey; Lady of the 
Lake; Vision of Sir Launfal; Sohrab and Ruslum; Lays of Ancient Rome; 
Selections from Burroughs; Treasure Island; Ivanhoe (or) Kenilworih. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. (1) Literature: Method 
as in Course A, with more attention to structure, diction 
and characters. Memorizing of short poems and passages. 
Reading list provided. (2) Composition. Subjects as in 
Course A; emphasis on neat, accurate written work and on 
explanation; study of structure of single paragraph; special 
effort to train keenness of observation and interesting pre- 
sentation of material. Oral work, as in Course A. 

Briggs and McKinney, Second Book of Composition; As You Li\e It 
(or) Merchant of Venice (or) Julius Caesar; selected English and Scottish 
Popular Ballads; Roger de Coverley Papers; Silas Marner; David Cop- 
per field ; selected poems and short stories. 

Course X. — 3 hours a week. Business English: an in- 
tensive drill in the fundamental principles of composition and 
the forms of business correspondence. 

Davis, Practical Exercises in English; Davis and Lingham, Business Eng- 
lish and Correspondence 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) (1) Rhetoric 
and Composition: business letters and social letters for va- 
rious occasons; building of paragraphs; sentence manipula- 
tion, particularly clearness through connectives, correct placing 
of modifiers, unmistakable reference. Oral composition, some 
based on literature. Special drill in punctuation. (2) Litera- 
ture: outline history of English literature through the Puritan 
Age. A play of Shakespeare, L' Allegro and // Penseroso, 
three Idylls of the King studied in detail; other books read 
more rapidly for substance. Reading list provided. 

Baldwin, Writing and Speaking; Long's History of English Literature; 
a Play of Shakespeare; Golden Treasury, books I and II; Chaucer, Selec- 
tions from Canterbury Tales; Idylls of the King; Tale of Two Cities; 
Carlyle's Essay on Burns (or) Macaulay's Life of Johnson. 



46 St. Mary's Bulletin 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Prerequisite: 
Course C. ( 1 ) Rhetoric and Composition : putting into prac- 
tice throughout term of fundamental principles involved in 
description, narration, exposition and argumentation, with 
especial emphasis on clearness and interest of style. Oral 
composition; debates; Review of English Grammar. (2) 
Literature: Study of Macbeth or Hamlet, Washington's 
Farewell Address and Webster's Bunker Hill Oration, 
Henry Esmond or Vanity Fair. History of English Litera- 
ture continued from Puritan Age in first term; History of 
American Literature in second term. Reading list provided. 

Baldwin, Writing and Speaking; Long's History of English Literature; 
Long's History of American Literature.. Classics for study as indicated; 
Huxley, Selections from Lay Sermons; Poe's Poems and Tales; Golden 
Treasury, books III and IV; Stevenson's Inland Voyage and Travels with 
a Donkey. 

Course Ml. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Prerequisite: 
Course D. Advanced composition. Writing of short stories, 
verse, essays, and a play; training in gathering and presenta- 
tion of research material. 

Course M2. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) Prerequisite: 
Course D. First Half-year. Romantic Movement. Special 
study of Wordsworth, Coleridge, Shelley, Keats, Byron. 
Second half-year. Victorian Period. Special study of Ten- 
nyson, Browning, Arnold. Extensive reading of other poets 
and prose writers. Frequent written criticism. 

Page, British Poets of the Nineteenth Century (or) Century Boofy of 
Verse, Vol. II; Editions of the various poets. 

Course Nl. — 4 hours a week, first half-year. (2 points.) 
Prerequisite: Course D. 

(a) — Prose writers of the Nineteenth Century; special 
study of Carlyle, Ruskin, Newman, Arnold. Readings from 
other writers. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 47 

(b) — The development of the English Novel, with study 
of representative novels. 

(a and b) are given in alternate years. 

Course N2. — 4 hours a week, second half-year. (2 points.) 
Shakespeare. The development of the drama studied by 
means of lectures and readings. A miracle play, a morality 
play, representative Elizabethan plays; reading in chrono- 
logical order of most of Shakespeare's plays. 

The Arden Edition of Shakespeare's Works; Dowden's Shakespeare 
Primer. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Candidates for graduation must take at least 15 points in foreign 
languages. 

Course I in French or Spanish will count four points for graduation for 
students who offer two years of Latin (Latin A and B) and who successfully 
complete Course II. 

FRENCH 

Course I. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
French I. Systematic study of the language. Grammar, 
reading, conversation. Careful drill in pronunciation. The 
rudiments of grammar, including the inflection of the regular 
and the more common irregular verbs, the plural nouns, the 
inflection of adjectives, participles, and pronouns; the use of 
personal pronouns, common adverbs, prepositions, and con- 
junctions ; the order of the words in the sentence, and the ele- 
mentary rules of syntax. Abundant easy exercises, designed 
not only to fix in the memory the forms and principles of 
grammar, but also to cultivate readiness in the reproduction 
of natural forms of expression. The reading of from 100 to 
1 75 duodecimo pages of graduated texts, with constant prac- 
tice in translating into French easy variations of the sentences 
read (the teacher giving the English), and in reproducing 



48 St. Mary's Bulletin 

from memory sentences previously read. Writing French 
from dictation. 

Fraser & Squair, French Grammar; Joynes, French Fairy Tales; La 
Bedoliere, Mere Michel, or equivalent. 

Course II. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Elementary 
French II. Continuation of previous work. The reading 
of from 250 to 400 pages of easy modern prose in the 
form of stories, plays, or historical or biographical sketches. 
Constant practice, as in the previous year, in translating into 
French easy variations upon the texts read. Frequent ab- 
stracts, sometimes oral and sometimes written, of portions 
of the text already read. Writing French from dictation. 
Continued drill upon the rudiments of grammar, with con- 
stant application in the construction of sentences. Mas- 
tery of the forms and use of pronouns, pronominal adjectives, 
of irregular verb forms, and of the simpler uses of the condi- 
tional and subjunctive. 

Fraser & Squair, French Grammar; Comfort, French Composition; La- 
biche et Martin, Le Voyage de M. Perrichon ; House, Three French Com- 
edies. 

Course III. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Intermediate 
French. At the end of this course the student should be 
able to read at sight ordinary French prose or simple poetry, 
to translate into French a connected passage of English 
based on the text read, and to answer questions involving a 
more thorough knowledge of syntax than is expected in the 
elementary course. The work comprises the reading of from 
400 to 600 pages of French of ordinary difficulty, a portion 
in the dramatic form; constant practice in giving French 
paraphrases, abstracts or reproductions from memory of se- 
lected portions of the matter read; the study of a grammar 
of moderate completeness; writing from dictation. 

Fraser & Squair, French Grammar; Bazin, Les Oberle ; Dumas, novels; 
Sardeau, Mille. de la Segliere; de Tocqueville, Voyages en Amerique; or 
equivalents. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 49 

Course IV. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Advanced 
French. 

A. — Development and history of the French drama. Read- 
ing: Corneille, Racine, Molliere; Fortier, Litterature Fran- 
caise. 

B. — Development and history of the French novel. Read- 
ings largely from nineteenth century authors. 

(Courses IV, A and IV, B given in alternate years.) 
FRENCH Club. — Open to advanced students in the de- 
partment who manifest ability. 

SPANISH 

Course I. — 4 hours a week. The study of the language 
begun. Careful drill in pronunciation; the rudiments of 
grammar, including the conjugation of the regular and the 
more common irregular verbs, the inflection of nouns, adjec- 
tives and pronouns, and the elementary rules of syntax; 
exercises containing illustrations of the principles of grammar. 
The careful reading and accurate rendering into good Eng- 
lish of about 100 pages of easy prose and verse, with trans- 
lation into Spanish of easy variations of the sentences read. 
Writing Spanish from dictation. 

DeVitis, Spanish Grammar; Loiseaux (or) Pittaro, Spanish Reader; 
Perez Galdos, Marianela. 

Course II. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Prerequisite: 
Spanish I. Continued study of the elements of grammar and 
syntax; mastery of all but the rare irregular verb forms and 
of the simpler uses of the modes and tenses. The reading of 
about 200 pages of prose and verse. Practice in translating 
Spanish into English, and English variations of the text into 
Spanish. Writing Spanish from dictation. Memorizing of 
easy short poems. 

Hills and Ford, Spanish Grammar; Juan Valera, El pajaro verde; 
Perez Eschrich, Fortuna; Carrion and Aza, Zaragueta; Valdes, Jose; Pedro 
de Alarcon, El Capitan Veneno ; or equivalents. 



50 St. Mary's Bulletin 

Course III. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Prerequisite: 
Spanish II. Grammar, prose composition and reading. 
Course II continued. A brief and practical study of every- 
day Spanish life. 

Crawford, Spanish Composition; Perez Galdoz, Dona Perfecla; Bequer, 
Short Stories; Jose Echegaray, El Cran Caleoio; and equivalents. 

LATIN 

Course A. — 4 hours a week. All regular inflections and 
the common irregular forms; marking of quantities; reading 
aloud; translation of sentences from Latin into English and 
from English into Latin; translation at hearing; derivation 
of words; systematic study of syntax; familiar Latin phrases 
and sayings ; sight reading of Roman stories. 

Smith, Latin Lessons. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. Caesar. Continuation of 
the study of forms and syntax; sight translation; military 
antiquities; oral and written composition. 

Bennett, Caesar's Gallic War (Books I-IV) ; Bennett, Latin Grammar; 
Bennett, TVem Latin Composition (Part I). 

Course C. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Cicero. Con- 
tinued systematic study of grammar; Roman political institu- 
tions; structure of a typical oration; sight translation; oral 
and written composition. 

Bennett, Cicero's Orations (four orations against Catiline, Archias, Man- 
ilian Law); Bennett, Latin Grammar; Bennett, /Ven> Latin Composition 
(Part II). 

Course D. — 4 hours a week. (4 points.) Virgil. Ap- 
preciative study of the /Eneid; literary and historical allu- 
sions;* prosody; passages and short quotations memorized; 
lectures and class reports on topics related to epic poetry; 
reading of the Iliad and the last six books of the /Kneid in 
an English translation; sight translation; oral and written 
composition. 

Bennett, Virgil's JEneii (Books I-VI) ; Bennett, Latin Grammar; Ben- 
nett, 7Ven> Latin Composition (Part III). 



St. Mary's Bulletin 51 

Course M. — (Alternate with N and omitted in 1920- 21.) 
3 hours a week. (3 points.) The public and private life of 
the Romans; occasional lectures and class reports on collat- 
eral reading; practice in writing and speaking Latin. (1) 
First half-year: The Roman Historians. (2) Second half- 
year: The Roman Poets. 

(1) Greenough and Peck, Livp (Books XXI-XXII) ; Greenough 
and Smith, Horace (Carmirta, Books I— II ; Sermones — selected). 

Course N. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Continuation 
of Course M. (1) First half-year: Roman Philosophy. (2) 
Second half-year: Roman Drama. 

(1) Shuckburgh, Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia; (2) Elmer. 
Terence's Phormio. 

MATHEMATICS 

Candidates for graduation must have credit for at least Mathematics C. 

Course A. — 4 hours a week. Algebra. To Quad- 
ratic Equations. Special products and factors; common 
divisors and multiples; fractions, ratio, proportion, variation 
and inequalities; linear equations, both numerical and literal, 
containing one or more unknown quantities; special drill on 
problems ; graphs and their use in linear equations and simple 
problems; square root and its applications; radicals and 
equations involving radicals; exponents, fractional and 
negative, and imaginaries. 

Wentworth-Smith, Academic Algebra. 

Course B. — 4 hours a week. Algebra completed. Quick 
review of powers and roots; the theory of the quadratic 
equation, and equations with one or more unknown quan- 
tities that can be solved by methods of the quadratic equa- 
tion; the statement and solution of problems; graphs of the 
simpler equations of the second degree; cube root with 
applications; arithmetical and geometrical progressions with 






52 St. Mary's Bulletin 

the theory; the binomial theorem with positive integral 
exponents. 

Wentworth-Smith, Academic Algebra. 

Course X. — 3 hours a week. Complete Arithmetic. 
Commercial problems; review of common and decimal 
fractions; metric system; mental arithmetic; percentage and 
the applications; mensuration. Not counted jor graduation. 
Intended especially jor business pupils, and as a review for 
prospective teachers. 

Van Tuyl, Complete Business Arithmetic (or) Moore and Miner, Concise 
Business Arithmetic. 

Course C. — 5 hours a week. (5 points.) Prerequisite: 
Course B. (1 ) Plane Geometry. 4 hours a week. (4 points.) 
The usual theorems and constructions, including the general 
properties of plane rectilinear figures; the circle and the 
measurement of angles; similar polygons; areas; regular 
polygons and the measurement of the circle. The solution 
of numerous original exercises, including loci problems. Ap- 
plication to the mensuration of lines and plane surfaces. 

Wentworth-Smith, Plane Geometry (or) Ford and Ammerman, Geometry. 

(2) Algebra from Quadratic Equations. 1 hour a week. 
(/ point.) Review for students who have had the Algebra 
but need a further drill, and for students intending to take 
college entrance examinations or the college entrance certi- 
ficate. 

Wentworth-Smith, Academic Algebra. 

Course D. — 3 hours a week. (3 points.) Prerequisite: 
Course C. ( 1 ) Solid Geometry. First half-year. 

The usual theorems and constructions of good text-books, 
including the relations of planes and lines in space ; the proper- 
ties and measurements of prisms, pyramids, cylinders and 
cones; the sphere and the spherical triangle. The solution 



St. Mary's Bulletin 53 

of numerous original exercises, including loci problems. Ap- 
plications to the mensuration of surfaces and solids. 

(2) Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. Second half-year. 
Definitions and relations of the six trigonometric functions 
as ratios; circular measurements of angles. Proofs of prin- 
cipal formulas, in particular for the sine, cosine, and tangent 
of the sum and the difference of two angles, of the double 
angle and the half angle, the product expressions for the sum 
or the difference of two sines or of two cosines, etc., the trans- 
formation of trigonometric expressions by means of these 
formulas. Solution of trigonometric equations of a simple 
character. Theory and use of logarithms (without the intro- 
duction of work involving infinite series). The solution of 
right and oblique triangles and practical applications, in- 
cluding the solution of right spherical triangles. 

Ford and Ammerman, Solid Geometry ; (2) Wentworth-Smith, Trigon- 
ometry. 

Course Ml . — 3 hours. (3 points.) Analytical Geometry. 
This course includes the definitions, equations and simplest 
properties of the straight line and conic sections. Particular 
attention is paid to plotting and to numerical problems. 

Smith and Gale, Nem Analytical Geometry (or) Riggs, Analytical Ge- 
ometry. 

Course M2. — 1 hour. (/ point.) Higher Algebra. The 
subjects included are: Functions and Theory of Limits, 
Derivatives, Development of Functions in series, convergency 
of series, theory of logarithms, determinants, theory of 
equations (including Sturm's theorem). 

Merrill and Smith, Selected Topics in College Algebra. 

Course N. — 2 hours a week. Prerequisite: Course M. 
Calculus. (2 points.) Elementary course in the differential 
and integral calculus. 

Granville, Differential and Integral Calculus. 



54 St. Mary's Bulletin 

NATURAL SCIENCE 

Candidates for graduation must have the equivalent of Course A and 
either Course C or Course D (4 points). 

Candidates for the College Entrance Certificate and students expecting to 
become candidates for a college degree after leaving St. Mary's must have 
had the equivalent of Course A and take Course D. 

Course A. — 4 hours a week. General Elements of 
Science. A general treatment of the elementary facts of the 
various branches of natural science. Designed to give the 
student power to understand more advanced thought and 
method and to make her familiar with the facts and theories 
underlying scientific management in the home. Individual 
laboratory work. 

Clark, General Science and Laboratory) Manual. 

Course C. — 4 hours a week recitation and demonstration 
and one double-hour laboratory practice. Elementary Bi- 
ology. . (4 points.) (a) A brief review of the general prin- 
ciples of animal physiology, (b) The general principles of 
plant life, and the natural history and classification of the 
plant groups. 

Individual laboratory work; stress laid upon accurate 
drawing and precise expressive description. 

Bigelow, Elementary Biology; Bailey, Botany. 

Course D. — 4 hours a week for the year recitation and 
demonstration, 1 double-hour laboratory. Elementary Chem- 
istry. (4 points.) (a) Individual laboratory work, (&) 
Instruction by lecture-table demonstration, used as a basis 
for questioning upon the general principles involved in the 
student's laboratory investigations. (c) The study of a 
standard text-book to the end that a student may gain a 
comprehensive and connected view of the most important 
facts and laws in elementary chemistry. 

Brownlee, First Principles of Chemistry and Laboratory Manual. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 55 



"PHILOSOPHY" 

The following courses are intended for general all-round development 
and are required of all candidates for graduation. 

"Philosophy Ml." — 2 hours a week, first half-year. 
(/ point.) Civil Government. The leading facts in the 
development and actual working of our form of government. 

Fiske, Civil Government in the United Stales. 

"Philosophy M2." — 2 hours a week, second half-year. 
(/ point.) Political Economy. The principles of the science 
made clear and interesting by their practical application to 
leading financial and industrial questions of the day. 

Ely and Wicker, Elementary Economics. 

"Philosophy Nla." — 2 hours a week, first half-year. 
(/ point.) Ethics. A general outline of the foundation 
principles, especially as applied to the rules of right living. 

Janet, Elements of Morals. 

"Philosophy Nib." — 2 hours a week, second half-year. 
(/ point.) Evidences. A study of the evidences for the 
truth of theistic belief discoverable by the light of nature 
independent of a special revelation; followed by a study of 
the evidences of Christian belief, demonstrating the truth of 
the New Testament narratives and the divine origin of 
Christianity. 

Fisher, Manual of Natural Theology; Fisher, Manual of Christian 
Evidences. 

"Philosophy N2a." — 2 hours a week, first half-year. 
(/ point.) Psychology. A brief introduction to the sub- 
ject, the text-book being supplemented by informal lectures 
and discussions. 

Halleck, Psychology. 



56 St. Mary's Bulletin 

"Philosophy N2b." — 2 hours a week, second half-year. 
(/ point.) Social Service. An elementary treatment, with 
discussions of practical problems suggested. 

Davis, The Field of Social Service. 

PEDAGOGY 

Pedagogy I. — 2 hours a week. (2 points.) 
The chief aims of this course are to learn what methods 
in teaching have been proven the best and to study the 
psychology of the child. With this is combined some prac- 
tical instruction in Hygiene and Social Work. The instruc- 
tion is partly by text-books and partly by informal lectures 
and discussions. Actual practice in teaching is also afforded, 
when desirable. 

Colgrove, The Teacher and the School; Hart, Educational Resources of 
Village and Rural Communities; James, Talf(s to Teachers. 

BIBLE STUDY 

Both resident and local students are required to take a 
one-hour course in Bible study. On account of the varying 
lengths of time spent at the School by different students, the 
variation of the classes which they enter, and the difference in 
knowledge of the subject shown by members of the same col- 
lege class, it is difficult to arrange these courses in as sys- 
tematic a way as might be desired. 

Students are therefore assigned to Bible classes partly on 
the ground of age and partly on the ground of the amount of 
work done and the length of time spent at the School. 

There are four divisions pursuing separate courses. These 
courses are designed to cover the Old and New Testament 
and the History of the Bible, in two years; and then to give 
a fuller knowledge of these subjects to those pursuing a 
longer course at the School. 




Domestic Art Students display "costumes" made in class at "Tea. 




1920 "Sketch Club" near the Rectory. 



St Mary's Bulletin 57 

The instruction is partly by lectures, accompanied by the 
use of a uniform edition of the Bible (with references, dic- 
tionary, maps, etc.) as a text-book; and partly by Instruc- 
tion Books. 

All resident students are also required to take a half-hour 
course in one of the Sunday classes. These courses are either 
on the Bible, or the Prayer Book, or Church History. 



DEPARTMENT OF MUSIC 

GENERAL REMARKS 

Music is both an Art and a Science. As such, the study 
of music is strong to train the mind, to touch the heart, and 
to develop the love of the beautiful. The importance of this 
study is being more and more realized by the schools, and its 
power felt as an element of education. No pains are spared 
in preparing the best courses of study, methods of instruction 
and facilities of work, in this department. 

It is the aim of the Music Department of St. Mary's to 
give students such advantages in technical training, in inter- 
pretative study, and in study of musical form and structure, 
as will enable them not only to develop their own talent, 
but also to hear, to understand and to appreciate the beau- 
tiful in all music. 

The department is equipped with Miller, Knabe, and 
Steinway grand pianos, in addition to twenty-six other pianos. 
The practice rooms are separate from the other buildings, 
and there is a beautiful Auditorium which seats six hundred 
people. 

Organ pupils are instructed on a two-manual pipe organ, 
with twenty stops, and a pedal organ. A Kinetic electric 
blower adds greatly to the convenience of instruction and 
practice. 

Courses of study are offered in Piano, Voice, Organ and 
Violin. 

CONCERTS AND RECITALS 

For the purpose of acquiring confidence and becoming ac- 
customed to appearing in public, all music pupils are required 
to meet once a fortnight in the Auditorium for an afternoon 



St Mary's Bulletin 59 

recital. All music pupils take part in these recitals, which 
are open only to members of the School. 

Public recitals are given by the advanced pupils during 
the second term of the school year. 

A series of Faculty recitals is given during the year, and 
there are frequent opportunities for hearing music by artists, 
both at St. Mary's and in the city. 

THE CHOIR 

No part of the School music is regarded as of more import- 
ance than the singing in Chapel. The whole student body 
attends the services of the Chapel and takes part in the sing- 
ing. The best voices are chosen for the choir, which leads in 
all the Chapel music, and often renders special selections; 
and for this purpose meets once a week for special practice. 
The students in this way become familiar with chanting, 
with the full choral service, and with the best church music. 
Membership in the choir is voluntary, but students admitted 
to the choir are required to attend the weekly rehearsal. 

A short rehearsal of the whole School is conducted after 
the service in the Chapel on Saturday evenings. 

THE CHORUS CLASS 

The Chorus Class is not confined to the music students, 
but is open to all students of the School, without charge. 
This training is of inestimable value, as it gives practice in 
sight reading and makes the student acquainted with the 
best choral works of the masters — an education in itself. 

Care is taken not to strain the voices and attention is paid 
to tone color and interpretation. The beauty and effect of 
chorus singing is in the blending of the voices, and to sing 
in chorus it is not necessary to have a good solo voice. 



60 St. Mary's Bulletin 

From the members of the Chorus Class voices are selected 
by the Chorus Conductor for special work. Membership in 
the Chorus Class is voluntary. But parents are urged to 
require this work from their daughters, if they are deemed 
fit for it by the Conductor. When, however, a student is 
enrolled, attendance at rehearsals is compulsory, until the 
student is excused by the Rector at the request of the parent. 



RELATION TO THE ACADEMIC 
DEPARTMENT 

Studies in the Music Department may be pursued in con- 
nection with full academic work, or may be the main pursuit 
of the student. 

Study in the Music Department is counted to a certain 
extent toward the academic classification of regular students 
of the Academic Department. The theoretical studies 
count the same as Academic studies. The technical work is 
given Academic credit in accordance with the rules stated 
below. 

Pupils specializing in music are, as a rule, expected to take 
academic work along with their musical studies. This is in 
accordance with the prevailing modern ideals in professional 
studies and the pursuit of special branches which require 
some general education in addition to the acquirements of a 
specialist. Students from the city may take lessons in music 
only. Certificates in Music are awarded only to students 
who have completed the required minimum of academic 
work. (See page 37.) 

The technical work in Music is also credited for academic 
classification, as follows: 

The completion at the School of the technical work in the 



St. Mary's Bulletin 61 

Freshman, *Sophomore, Junior or Senior classes in Music will 
entitle the student to 3 points of academic credit for the work 
of each class thus completed under the following conditions: 

(1) Not more than three points may be earned in any one year in Piano, 
Voice, Violin or Organ — whether one or more of these subjects is studied. 

(2) Not more than 12 points (one-fifth of the total amount required for 
graduation from the college) may be earned in all. 

(3) In order to be entitled to credit the pupil must be a member of the 
College. (Preparatory pupils may not count Music toward subsequent 
academic graduation.) 

(4) In order to be entitled to credit for the technical work of a given 
class in music, the student must also have completed satisfactorily the 
theoretical work of that class. 



*It should be carefully noted that the names of the classes, as here used, 
are of musical standing only, and do not refer to the academic class of 
which the same student may be a member. 



AWARDS 

The Certificate of the Department is awarded under the 
following conditions: 

1. The candidate must have completed the work, theoretical and tech- 
nical, of the Senior Class in the Music Department. 

2. The candidate must have been for at least two years a student of the 
department. 

3. The candidate must have finished the technical work required and 
have passed a satisfactory examination therein, at least one-half year before 
the certificate recital which she must give at the end of the year. 

4. The candidates must have completed the required minimum of 
Academic Work. (See page 37.) 

The Diploma, the highest honor in the Music Department, 
is awarded to a student who has already received the Certifi- 
cate, who gives evidence of conspicuous musical ability, and 
who thereafter pursues advanced work in technique and 
interpretation for at least one year at the School. 



62 5/. Mary's Bulletin 

THE COURSES 

It is the aim of earnest and leading conservatories and 
schools to standardize the teaching of music and to har- 
monize the work of private teachers with that of the con- 
servatories 

Standardization of music teaching and of school credits 
for music study are subjects now receiving serious attention 
by educational authorities throughout the country. To this 
end a definite standard of requirements must be established 
and a means adopted of definitely ascertaining the accom- 
plishment of such requirements. For such a purpose, as is 
the case in all other subjects taught, the use of a standard 
text work is necessary. 

After a thorough investigation, it seems that the Progres- 
sive Series of Piano Lessons, edited by Godowsky, Hof- 
mann and other world-renowned artists and pedagogues, 
fully meets the requirements as such a text work, covering 
as it does the theoretical and practical branches of music in 
a correlated manner; and it has been adopted as the standard 
text of the Music Department of St. Mary's School. The 
course is so arranged in systematic and progressive order that 
a pupil's progress is definitely measured. There is, however, 
no hard and fast adherence to any particular "method" of 
playing, the individuality and judgment of the teacher 
having full play, not only in the selection of music but also 
in adapting the work to the peculiar need of each pupil. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

Students entering the Department will be given both theo- 
retical and practical examinations and placed in the grade 
they are qualified to enter. 

It is most desirable and is strongly urged that the student, 
on entering, have previously a good working knowledge of 



St Mary's Bulletin 63 

the scales, the staff, notation and time values. A review 
of these rudiments, to which the First and Second Quarter 
Lessons of the Progressive Series are devoted, will take place 
at the beginning of Theory I. 

Students presenting certificates from teachers authorized 
by the Art Publication Society to teach the Progressive 
Series, will be allowed full credit for work accomplished 
and be placed in the succeeding grade without examination. 

THE COURSES 

The courses in Music are divided into Theoretical (in- 
cluding for convenience History of Music) and Technical. 

THEORETICAL COURSES 
(One hour each per week. Academic credit: 1 point.) 

For the courses in Theory, required of all music students, 
the Lessons of the Progressive Series are used throughout. 
These lessons are divided into four Grades: Elementary, 
Intermediate, Advanced and Graduate, each grade being 
further sub-divided into four quarters of nine Lesson Leaflets 
each, together with supplementary Ear-training Exercises. 

Theory I. (Preparatory): 3rd and 4th Quarters of Lessons. 
Theory 2. (Freshman) : 5th and 6th Quarters of Lessons. 
Theory 3. (Sophomore) : 7th and 8th Quarters of Lessons. 
Theory 4. (Junior) : 9th and 10th Quarters of Lessons. 
Theory 5. (Senior): 11th and 1 2th Quarters of Lessons and History of 
Music. 

Much importance is attached to ear-training, which is con- 
tinuous throughout the courses. Training in the appreciation 
of music is carried on in all classes, both theoretical and 
practical, in addition to special lectures devoted to this subject. 

TECHNICAL COURSES 

In general, each course corresponds to a year's work for a 
pupil with musical taste. But even faithful work for some 
pupils may require more than a year for promotion. 



64 St. Mary's Bulletin 



PIANO 

Course 1. — (Preparatory.) — The following major scales: C, G, D, A. F, 
B flat, E flat, hands separate, in sixteenth notes, metronome 92 to a 
quarter note. Harmonic minor scales, and major arpeggios of above, 
hands separate, moderate tempo. 

Studies : Duvernoy, op., 1 76 ; Kohler, op., 1 57 and op., 242 ; Heller* 
op., 47; Burgmuller, op., 100. 

Course II. — (Freshman.) — Major scales, hands together, in 16th notes, 100 
to a quarter note. Harmonic and melodic minor scales, hands separate 
in 16th notes, 100 to a quarter note. Major and minor arpeggios, 
hands separate, in 16th notes, 80 to a quarter note. 

Studies: Duvernoy, op., 120; Czerny, op., 636; Le Couppey, op., 
20; Heller, op., 46. 

Course III. — (Sophomore.) — All scales, hands together, in 16th notes, 112 
to a quarter note. Arpeggios, hands separate, in 16th notes, 100 to a 
quarter note. Three major scales in thirds, sixths, tenths, and contrary 
motion, in 16th notes, 100 to a quarter note. Major scales in octaves, 
hands separate, in 8th notes, 100 to a quarter note. 

Studies: Czerny, op., 299; Berens, op., 61; Krause, op., 2; Heller, 
op., 45; Bach, Two-part Inventions. 

Course IV. — (Junior.) — All scales, hands together, in 16th notes, 120 to a 
quarter note. All arpeggios, hands together, in 16th notes, 116 to a 
quarter note. Three harmonic minor scales in thirds, sixths, and tenths, 
and in contrary motion, in 16th notes, 100 to a quarter note. Major 
scales in octaves, hands separate, in 16th notes, 72 to a quarter note. 
Scale of C in double thirds, hands separate, moderate tempo. 

Studies: Bach, Suites and Three-part Inventions; Cramer; Clementi. 

Course V. — (Senior.) — Six major scales and six minor scales (three har- 
monic, three melodic) in thirds, sixths and tenths, and in contrary 
motion, in 1 6th notes, 112 to a quarter note. Dominant and diminished 
seventh arpeggios, hands together, 116. Major scales in double thirds, 72. 
Octave scales, 92. 

Studies: Bach well-tempered Clavichord and advanced studies in 
interpretation. 

Course VI. — (For Diploma.) — Preludes and Fugues from Bach's well- 
tempered Clavichord, 1 and 2. The student must have a repertoire in- 
cluding works of Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Chopin, Mendelssohn, 
and of modern composers, MacDowell and others. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 65 



VOICE * 

Course I. — (Preparatory.) — Foundation principles of breathing, tone pro- 
duction and enunciation. Sieber 8 measure exercises. Easy songs. 

Course II. — (Freshman.) — Development of technic. Elementary vocalises. 
Concone, Spicker, etc. Songs. 

Course III. — (Sophomore.) — Continued development of technic. Vocalises 
by Marchesi, Lamperti, Spicker. Songs and easy arias from oratorio 
and opera. 

Course IV. — (Junior.) — Advanced work in technic. Vocalises. Interpreta- 
tion of classic songs and arias. 

Course V. — (Senior.) — Advanced technic applied in vocalises, classic songs 
in English, French, and Italian. Oratorio and opera. Preparation of 
recital program. 

ORGAN 

Before beginning the study of the Organ, the pupil must 
have finished the Preparatory Course I in Piano. 

Course I. — (Freshman.) — Clemens' Modern School for the Organ. Exercises 
in varieties of touch and in part playing. Easy pieces. 

Course II. — (Sophomore.) — Clemens' Modern Pedal Technique, Vol. 2; 
Carl's Master studies; J. S. Bach's Short Preludes and Fugues. 

Course III. — (Junior.) — Clemens* continued. Carl continued. Bach's Pre- 
ludes and Fugues.. Sonatas by Merkel, Mendelssohn and Guilmant. 

Course IV. — (Senior.) — Bach's Preludes and Fugues, and Trio Sonatas. 
Sonatas and symphonies, classic and modern. Preparation of recital 
program. 

The usual supplementary studies in hymn-playing, service 
accompaniment, sight-reading, modulation, registration, and 
structure of organ, are given progressively throughout the 
course. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTIFICATE 

In addition to the completion of the Senior Course in 
Organ, the requirements for a Certificate in Organ include 



66 St. Mary's Bulletin 

the completion of the Sophomore Course in Piano; two 
hours daily practice (at least one at the organ) during the 
Junior and Senior years; and a public recital. 



REQUIREMENTS FOR DIPLOMA 

For a Diploma the pupil must have at least one year of 
additional study after completing the requirements for the 
certificate. Elementary counterpoint; accompaniment of full 
Morning and Evening Prayer and Holy Communion at 
Sunday Service in Chapel. The final examination will con- 
sist of the practical work at the organ as provided for in 
the American Guild of Organists' examination for the degree 
of Associate. 

VIOLIN 

The course in Violin is indicated in the summary given 
below. Pupils of the department, if sufficiently advanced, 
are required to take part in the Orchestra, which is included 
in the regular work of the department. 

Course I. — Exercises and studies by Heming, David (Part I.), Dancla, 
Hofman op. 25, Wohlfahrt op. 45. Easy solos by Hauser, Sitt, Dancla, 
Papini, etc. 

Course 2. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part II.), Sevcik 
op. 6, Kayser op. 37. Solos adapted to the needs of students. 

Course 3. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, David (Part II.), Sevcik 
op. 6, op. 8, op. 9, Dont, Kayser op. 20, Kreutzer. Solos by DeBeriot, 
Dancla, etc. Modern composers. 

Course 4. — Exercises and studies by Schradieck, Sevcik, Rode, Kreutzer. 

Sonatas, Concertos by Viotti, Spohr, DeBeriot, etc. 
Course 5. — Exercises and studies by Sevcik, Mazas, Fiorillio. Sonatas, 

Concertos. Public recital. 

A knowledge of piano, sufficient to play second grade 
pieces at least, is required in the case of pupils in the last two 
courses. 



ART DEPARTMENT 

The aim of the Art Department is to afford an opportunity 
for serious study, and to give a thorough Art education, which 
will form the basis of further study in the advanced schools 
of this country and abroad; also, to enable pupils who com- 
plete the full course to become satisfactory teachers. All 
work is done from nature. 

The Studio is open daily during school hours. Candidates 
for a certificate in the Art Department must pass satis- 
factorily the course in Drawing, Painting, and the History of 
Art, and must also satisfy the academic requirements for a 
certificate, as stated on page 37. 

The technical work in the Art Course, leading to a certifi- 
cate, ordinarily requires a period of three years for comple- 
tion. About half of this time is required for Drawing, and 
the second half for Painting. 

I. Drawing. The student is first instructed in the free- 
hand drawing of geometric solids, whereby she is taught the 
fundamentals of good drawing, the art of measuring correctly, 
and the drawing of straight and curved lines. This work is 
exceedingly important. 

Next the student is taught drawing from still-life, with 
shading ; the drawing of plants ; of casts ; original designs — 
conventional and applied — in black and white, and in color; 
and pencil sketches from nature. 

After this comes charcoal drawings; or shading in pen and 
ink; or wash-drawings in monochrome, as in magazine 
illustrating. 

II. Painting. This includes work in oil or in water color. 
The student is required to paint two large still-life groups; 

two large landscapes and two flower studies from nature; 
two out-door sketches from nature, and an original poster. 



68 St. Mary's Bulletin 

HI. History of Art. This study includes the history of 
Architecture, Sculpture and Painting. This course is import- 
ant and is required of all students in the regular art course. 

Special Courses. — Pupils who do not wish to take the 
regular course may take any of the above courses or of the 
following special courses: 

1 . Flower Painting. — Special attention is given to flower painting in 
water color. 

2. Still-life Painting. — This work is preparatory to more advanced work 
in the flower painting and life classes. Either oil or water color may be 
used as a medium. 

3. China Painting. 

4. Life Class. — A living model is provided from which the students may 
draw and paint. 

5. Sketch Club. — This club is formed of students who take turn in posing 
in costume. The same model poses only once. During the spring and fall 
months outdoor sketching from nature is done. 

6. Advanced Antique. — All classes are graded according to this work. 
Drawing from Greek antiques in charcoal is required of all pupils taking the 
full course. 

7. Design Class. — This work is planned according to the principles origi- 
nated and applied by Arthur W. Dow, and is a combination of the Occi- 
dental and Oriental principles. A close study of nature and an original 
imaginative use of her forms in design is the keynote of this method. 

8. Architectural and Mechanical Drawing. — To supply the demand for 
women draftsmen in architects' offices, a special course in Architectural and 
Mechanical Drawing is offered by the School. The course begins with 
geometrical figures, projections of objects, and leads up gradually to the 
highest forms of architectural work. 

9. Commercial Art. — The principles of Commercial Art are taught in 
the form of original posters advertising the various business houses and trips 
to foreign lands. 



DEPARTMENT OF EXPRESSION 

The faculty of expressing oneself clearly and effectively 
is valuable in every calling. A well-trained voice and clear 
enunciation are equally desirable in ordinary conversation 
and in public speaking. The purpose of the study of expres- 
sion is to attain these ends ; to broaden the power of individual 
thinking, to awaken a love and appreciation of literature by 
the lucid interpretation of it to others. 

REGULAR REQUIRED WORK 

Students of the Freshman and Upper Preparatory classes 
are required to take a period of expression each week in 
connection with their regular work, and for this there is no 
extra charge. This course deals with fundamental read- 
ing. Particular attention is paid to the standing position, 
articulation, pronunciation, projection, breath control, and 
the correction of mannerisms, leading the student to read 
intelligently so as to give pleasure to the listener. 

SPECIAL WORK 

The special courses, which should be taken by students 
in connection with work in the academic department and for 
which the charge is extra are ( 1 ) Class Expression and (2) 
Private Expression. 

CLASS EXPRESSION 

In this class the number is limited and each student re- 
ceives careful individual attention. The course is so arranged 
as to afford the student the opportunity to appear in informal 
recitals from time to time, thereby gaining in confidence and 
poise. 



70 St. Martfs Bulletin 

PRIVATE EXPRESSION 

The course of the private pupil is more inclusive. A thor- 
ough training is given in all the principles of expression. 
During the year each student appears in public recitals, for 
which she is taught to interpret the best literature. 

Private pupils are admitted to the Dramatic Club, giving 
them the advantage of the study and presentation of at least 
two good plays during the year. 

The academic credit for this course is 3 points for each 
year. 

AWARDS 

As in other departments, the Certificate is only awarded 
if the student has completed the required Minimum of 
Academic Work in the College (see page 37). 

The regular course of the department is planned to extend 
over four years, leading to the Diploma. 

The Certificate is awarded on the completion of the work 
of the Third Year and the giving of a public recital. 

Students who have practically completed the academic 
work before taking up the work of the department may be 
able to complete the Three Years' Course in two years. 

OUTLINE OF THE COURSE FOR DIPLOMA OR 
CERTIFICATE 

FIRST YEAR 

Practice Book of Leland Powers School. — Evolution of Expression, 
Vols. I and II. 

Public Reading. — The major part of the time is devoted to fundamental 
problems. A portion of each week is devoted to drill on selections of the 
student's individual choice, and these selections are presented at informal 
recitals during the year. 

Gesture. — Freeing exercises. Significance of carriage, attitude and move- 
ment. Principles of gesture. 



St Mary's Bulletin 71 



Voice. — Fundamental work of freeing and developing the voice. Basic 
principles of voice production ; voice placing, deep breathing, control of 
breath, vowel forming, consonantal articulation, development of vocal range, 
intonation, melody of speech. Correction of individual faults. 

Dramatic Art. — Platform deportment. Correct sitting, standing and 
walking, entrance and exit, platform methods and traditions. Presentation 
of scenes and one act plays. 

Pantomime. — Elementary principles. Correction of defects and manner- 
isms in bodily expression and in facial expression. 

SECOND YEAR 

Practice Book of Leland Powers School. — Evolution of Expression, Vols. 
III. and IV. Principles of the four volumes — a careful study of the six- 
teen laws of evolution which are founded on psychological principles. 

Public Reading. — Students are allowed more freedom in their choice of 
selections. 

•Gesture. 

Voice. — Review of fundamentals. 

Emerson System of Physical Culture. 

Dramatic Art. — Presentation of scenes and one-act plays. 

Recitals. 

THIRD YEAR 

Poetic Interpretation. — The poetry of Tennyson, Lowell, Longfellow, 
Kipling, and other masters. 

Applied Gesture and Voice. 

Physical Training. — The four divisions of the Emerson System in their 
relation to unity and expression. (Normal work.) 

Impersonation. — Two or more Shakespearean plays with special refer- 
ence to the differentiation of the characters. 

Dramatic Art. — Study of the farce, comedy, burlesque, melodrama, and 
tragedy. Dramatization of a story or original plot. 

Recitals. (Public.) 

FOURTH YEAR 

Poetic Interpretation. — Continued. 
Extemporaneous Speaking . and Debate. 
Pedagogy. 
Psychology. 

Gymnastics. — Floor work, including free exercises, apparatus work, 
marching, indoor and outdoor games. 
Bible. — Bible and hymn reading. 
Impersonation. — Continued. 
Dramatic Art. — Classical plays. 
Recitals. 



HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 

Home Economics, as a distinctive subject of study, is a 
study of the economic, sanitary and aesthetic aspects of food, 
clothing and shelter as connected with their selection, prepara- 
tion and use by the family in the home, or by other groups 
of people. Reference is also made to composition, classi- 
fication, manufacture, adulteration and cost. 

The Home Economics Department of St. Mary's accom- 
plishes this instruction with the idea of developing the skill 
and self-reliance of the individual student, by the courses 
described. 

The purpose of the instruction is to afford training in the 
subjects that pertain to life in the home, to aid the young 
woman to become proficient in practical housekeeping, and 
in making the home more beautiful. 

The constant aim of the courses is to develop the initiative 
and independence of the student, skill in practical use of 
materials, and a knowledge of economical purchase and wise 
selection as of equal importance. 

Well equipped laboratories for cooking and sewing afford 
excellent facilities for class work. 

The work is planned to extend over two courses: a first 
year course and a second year course. 

AWARDS 

The Certificate in Home Economics is awarded on the 
completion of the four courses (A I., A II., B I. and B II.) 
to those students who have also completed the Minimum of 
Academic Work in the College required for all Certificates. 
The Minimum of Academic Work is the same as for Cer- 
tificates in other departments except that Science D (Chem- 
istry) must be included in the 12 elective points. 




a. 



u 



a, 



a 



St. Mary's Bulletin 73 

The Certificate in Domestic Science is awarded on the 
completion of Home Economics A I. and A II., under the 
same conditions as the full certificate as regards academic 
requirements. 

THE COURSES 

Home Economics A I ("Domestic Science I") ; General 
Cooking (First Year) (Academic credit: 2 points). Four 
hours a week of practical work and one hour of theory, in 
which the practical as well as the theoretical work is discussed. 

The course includes a study of the following : 

I. Food materials and foodstuffs — What food is; veg- 
etable and animal foods; foodstuffs; foodstuffs in nutri- 
tion; food adjuncts. 

II. Fuels and cooking apparatus — Comparison of dif- 
ferent fuels; their use; their cost. 

III. Food Preparation — (a) Principles of cooking; 
(b) Care of food in the house; (c) Weighing and meas- 
uring; (d) Processes of food preparation; (e) Preparing 
and mixing; (f) Cooking processes; (g) Disposal of 
waste food. 

IV. Causes of spoiling foods — Methods of pre- 
servation. 

V. Heat and its application to food — Methods of 
conveying; losses in heating. 

VI. Special attention to various methods of preparing: 
Fruits; vegetables; cereals and their products; milk and 
milk products; eggs; fish; meats and meat substitutes. 

VII. Household sanitation — The dwelling; its loca- 
tion, selection and furnishing in relation to health prob- 
lems; including also a study of lighting, ventilating and 
heating; the relation of germ life to water, ice and milk 
supplies, and to other foods, both uncooked and preserved 
by various methods. 



74 5/. Mary's Bulletin 

Home Economics A II {"Domestic Science II") : (Sec- 
ond Year) (Academic credit: 2 points). A continuation of 
Home Economics AI, with the addition of the following: 

I. Food and dietetics — Study of composition and nu- 
tritive value of foods; simple food chemistry; diet and 
dietaries. 

II. Household management — Expenditure for food 
and shelter; buying and shopping methods; menus; bal- 
anced meals; relation to nutrition and cost. 

III. Cooking: 

1 . Applied dietaries — Invalid and infant cookery. 

2. Fancy cooking — Methods of preparation, gar- 

nishing and serving. 

Special attention is paid in Home Economics A I and 
A II to preparation and serving. In serving, the table equip- 
ment, setting of the table and serving are carefully studied 
and practiced. 

A large recently remodeled and newly equipped domestic 
science kitchen is arranged to provide the best facilities for 
class-work, both individual and co-operative, and a special 
dining-room gives the class opportunity for putting into prac- 
tice methods of service. A series of luncheons is served by 
the class in this dining-room, applying the lessons on the 
laying of the table, the serving of different meals, the prepara- 
tion of the meal, the care of the dining-room, and of the 
table, silver, china, etc. 

Home Economics B I ("Domestic Art I") (First Year) : 
General Serving — It is the aim of this course to train the 
fingers and to teach the student to apply the stitches as a 
means of constructing a definite article. 



5/. Mary's Bulletin 75 

The course includes: 

I. Handwork: 

a. The simple and necessary stitches required in 

garment making, learned as needed. The 
following are suggestive: hemming, gather- 
ing, running, overhand, etc. 

b. Seams and application usually needed, such 

as: French fell, tailor's, etc., and plackets. 

c. Decoration — Simple and attractive, designed 

and applied by the students making use of 
simple and decorative stitches. 

II. Machine work — Use and care of machine and its 
simple attachments. 

III. Taking of measurements — Cutting and making of 
undergarments. 

IV. Study of commercial patterns — Their use, altera- 
tion and interpretation. 

V. Study and discussion of: 

a. Textile materials — Their growth, use and 

manufacture. 

b. Economics of dress; economics of selection of 

materials. 

c. Care and repair of clothing — Suggestions for 

daily use, mending and remodeling. 

Home Economics B II ("Domestic Art II") (Second 
Year) : Advanced course in Garment Making to follow the 
general course. 

It is the object of this course to give the student some 
technical skill which she can increase with practice. It 
includes the following: 

I. Review of principles learned in general course of 
sewing. 



76 St. Mary's Bulletin 

II. Construction of more advanced garments: 

a. Cotton dress of sheer material — tucked blouse, 

principle of inserting lace or embroidery. 

b. Close fitting lining — putting together, fitting, 

finished seams. 

c. Wool dress, plans for seam finish, placket, 

fastenup. 

III. Embroidery and decorative work — Towels, doi- 
lies, etc. 

IV. Discussion of such subjects as: 

a. Clothing — Uses and selection; relation to 

health. 

b. History of costume. 

c. Costume design. Importance of artistic dress 

and its requirements; principles of design; 
value in color; color harmony; simplicity in 
dress; appropriateness. 

d. Use of patterns — Choice of materials; cost; 

economical cutting of garments, etc. 

TEXT r BOOKS 

The courses are based on the text-books of Professors 
Kinne and Cooley of Teachers' College, Columbia University, 
and students use these books as reference text-books. 

A I. and A II.: Kinne & Cooley, Foods and Household Management. 
B I. and B II.: Kinne & Cooley, Shelter and Clothing. 

Constant reference is also made to the other current litera- 
ture of the subject. 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

The Business Department of St. Mary's was established 
in 1897 to meet the growing demand for instruction in the 
commercial branches, which are more and more affording 
women a means of livelihood. The course is planned to 
accomplish this purpose as nearly as possible. 

The curriculum embraces thorough instruction in Stenog- 
raphy, Typewriting, Manifolding, etc.; Bookkeeping, Arith- 
metic, Penmanship, and English. 

Students taking, as is advised, the course in connection 
with academic work, would ordinarily complete the Business 
Course in one school year. 

Students may take either the full course or any part of it. 

Graduates of the Department have been very successful 
in their practical business engagements, and are the best 
recommendation for the work of the department. 

REQUIREMENTS 

In order to be well prepared to take the course to advan- 
tage, students, before entering the Business Department, 
should have satisfactorily completed the work of the Prepara- 
tory School or its equivalent. 

Attention is called to the fact that the services of a stenog- 
rapher and her ability to command a high salary depend not 
only on her technical skill in actual typewriting and stenog- 
raphy, to which much may be added by practice afterwards, 
but to the preliminary mental equipment with which she 
undertakes her technical preparation. 

AWARDS 

The Business Certificate is awarded those students who 
complete the work of the full course, including all the work 



78 5/. Mary's Bulletin 

required for certificates in Stenography, Typewriting and 
Bookkeeping. 

The Diploma of the department is reserved for those stu- 
dents who, in addition to completing the work required for 
the Business Certificate, have the mental equipment to do 
unusually good work in their profession, and who have 
demonstrated their fitness for such work by actual practice. 

Certificates in Stenography, Typewriting or Bookkeeping 
are awarded students who have completed the respective 
requirements stated below. 

COURSES 

In Stenography, the Isaac Pitman System of Shorthand 
is used. This is the standard system, is easily acquired, and 
meets all the demands of the amanuensis and the reporter. 

The work of the courses and the requirements for Cer- 
tificates are as follows: 

Stenography. — The texts used are Isaac Pitman's Short Course in Short- 
hand, Business Correspondence in Shorthand Nos. 1 and 2, and Book of 
Phrases and Contractions. In connection with the texts, the following 
books from the Isaac Pitman shorthand library are used in class for reading 
and dictation purposes: Vicar of Wakefield, Irving's Tales and Sketches, 
Macaulay's Warren Hastings, Dickens* Haunted Man, Leaves from the 
Note Book of Thomas Allen Reed, etc. 

The pupils are taught Manifolding, Composition, Punctuation, Spelling, 
Business Forms, Correspondence and Reporting. 

To receive the Certificate, the student must have completed the required 
work in the foregoing; must have attained a speed of at least 80 words a 
minute from dictation; and must have completed the required work in English 
in the Academic Department. 

A certificate in Stenography will not be given unless the student has also 
taken the course in Typewriting. 

Typewriting. — The touch system is used, and to obtain the Certificate 
the student must have attained a speed of 50 words a minute from dictation; 
40 words from printed matter; and 30 words from stenographic notes; and 
must have completed the required work in English. 



St. Martfs Bulletin 79 



Bookkeeping. — Miner's Bookkeeping (Introductory Course) is used as a 
text. As a student advances, the instruction becomes thoroughly practical, 
a regular set of books is opened, and the routine of a well-ordered business 
house thoroughly investigated and practically pursued. The object is to 
prepare the student to fill a position immediately after graduation from the 
School. 

For the Certificate, in addition to the technical work in Bookkeeping, 
the course in Commercial Arithmetic (Math. X) must be completed. 



DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICAL 
TRAINING 

Special stress at St. Mary's is laid on the care of the 
health and the physical training of the students. 

All resident students are required to spend an hour daily 
in open air exercise, and are required to take the regular 
physical training course for two periods weekly. 

A special class is provided for those who require special 
treatment, either on account of physical peculiarities or weak- 
ness. For such cases the family physician should send written 
instructions. 

THE GYMNASIUM 

The Gymnasium in Clement Hall is ideal for the purpose, 
and is excellently equipped. The regular physical training 
exercises are given here, and the athletic sports are held here 
when the weather is unsuitable for games outside. So far as 
possible, however, the training is given in the open, and the 
climate of Raleigh makes open air games and exercise pos- 
sible practically throughout the year. 

Hie one aim of the Physical Training Department is the 
conservation and development of the health of the students 
by their better physical training. 

To determine the training proper for each student and to 
make it possible to denote the degree of improvement, a 
physical examination, with physical measurements and 
strength tests, is made of each student by the School Phy- 
sician and the Physical Director at the beginning of each 
session and also during the second half-year. Comparative 
statements are sent to parents for their information. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 81 

THE COURSE 

Daily exercise is required of all resident students. 

The course is thoroughly practical and is intended to train 
the students in the art of managing their bodies, in standing, 
walking, using their limbs, breathing, and the like. The ex- 
ercise is most wholesome and the training imparts to the 
students suggestions about their health which will be most 
useful to them throughout life. 

Short talks on general hygiene are also given by the 
Physical Director. 

Gymnastics: Two periods each week are devoted to Gym- 
nastics with or without apparatus, and to games and folk 
dances. 

The course includes free arm exercises with Indian Clubs 
and Dumb-bells for general development; folk-dances and 
exercises on German and Swedish apparatus to overcome 
awkwardness and develop strength, etc. 

Athletics: At least one period each week is used in playing 
one or more of the team games: Basket-ball, Volley-ball, 
Captain-ball, or Playground-baseball. 

AESTHETIC DANCING 

A class or classes in Aesthetic Dancing begins during the 
fall term, and the course consists of twenty lessons, for which 
the charge is $15. 

A member of this class is allowed to substitute the Aesthetic 
Dancing for the regular Physical Culture classes on the days 
of the Dancing Class. 

The Athletic Associations (mentioned on page 25) are 
under the general supervision of the Physical Director. Fall 
and Spring Outdoor Meets, Match Games almost weekly 
between the teams in the games mentioned above, and 
Tennis Tournaments are held each year under the direction 
of the Department. 



GENERAL SCHOOL REGULATIONS 



In accepting the responsibility for the care of the 
students at St. Mary's, it is necessary to state that no 
boarding student is desired whose sense of honor is not 
sufficiently developed to make it possible to trust her — 

(/) Not to endanger life and property by for- 
bidden use of fire, 

(2) Not to go off the ample school grounds with- 
out permission, and 

(3) Not to be out of her proper place when she 
is expected and supposed to be in her own bed. 



The effort of St. Mary's School is to maintain, as far as 
possible, the family life of the students entrusted to its care. 

Local students are expected to conform to all the house- 
hold requirements of the School while present. 

The desire of parents will always be carefully considered, 
but the final authority in all cases is vested with the Rector. 
It is understood that in sending a student to the School the 
parent agrees to submit to such rules as the Rector thinks 
necessary for the good of the School as a whole. 

Parents wishing students to have special permission for 
any purpose should communicate directly with the Rector, 
and not through the student. 

No student will be permitted to take less than the mini- 
mum hours of work. 

Written explanations must be presented by students re- 
questing excuse for absence, tardiness, or lack of preparation 
in any duty. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 83 



EXAMINATIONS 

No student is excused from any of the regular school exami- 
nations, and all examinations missed by reason of illness 
must be made up. 

ATTENDANCE 

All students are required to arrive in time for the opening 
of the School session and to remain until it closes. If they 
arrive late without the Rector's approval, they are liable to 
forfeiture of their places in the School. If withdrawn before 
the close without the Rector's approval, their connection 
with the School is permanently terminated and their claim 
to a certificate of honorable dismissal is forfeited. 



HOLIDAYS 

The Christmas holiday, as a rule, is of two weeks' duration. 
Every student is required to be present on time at its close. 

There is no Thanksgiving or Easter holiday, and students 
are not to leave the School at these seasons. Thanksgiving 
Day is a free day to be celebrated in the School, and Good 
Friday is a Holy Day, but otherwise the school duties are 
not interrupted. 

ABSENCE 

There is a recess of two weeks at Christmas and a recess 
of five days at Mid-Lent. Except for these recesses students 
are allowed to leave the School only in cases of severe 
illness, or for some other reason so serious as to seem sufficient 
to the Rector. The application should be made as early as 
possible directly by the parent to the Rector, in writing, if 
possible. 



84 St. Mary's Bulletin 

An extension for serious cause of permitted absence must 
be obtained before the expiration of the time for which the 
original permission was given. 

No absence whatever can be allowed within one week of 
Thanksgiving Day or Washington's Birthday, or from Palm 
Sunday to Easter, inclusive. 

A student who overstays her absence without the Rector's 
permission and approval will by that act terminate her con- 
nection with the School. 

VISITS 

The presence of a parent in Raleigh does not in any respect 
excuse a student from any regulations of the School without 
permission from the Rector, and obedience to the conditions 
governing such permissions is a matter between the student 
and the Rector alone. 

The Rector is glad to have parents visit their daughters in 
Raleigh as often and for as long a time as may be con- 
venient to them, and he will take pleasure in granting all 
possible privileges, not inconsistent with the welfare of the 
School, to enable parent and daughter to see each other. It 
is, however, not convenient to have parents spend the night 
at the school. In general, students are not excused during 
school hours, and no exception is made to this rule, except 
where a parent from a distance happens to stop over in 
Raleigh for only an hour or two. Except for very serious 
necessity, parents are urgently requested not to ask that 
their daughters come to the Railway Station to meet them. 

No student is allowed to spend the night outside of the 
School except with her mother, or one who sustains a mother's 
relation to her. 

Visitors are not desired on Sunday. Ladies from the city 
are welcome on afternoons other than Saturday or Sunday 
between half-past three and six. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 85 

All visitors are received in the parlor. 

Invitations to students should be sent through the Rector. 

CHURCH ATTENDANCE 

Town students, as well as resident students, are required 
to attend the daily Chapel service at 8:45 A. M. As St. 
Mary's is distinctly a Church school, all resident students are 
required to attend all Chapel services. 

ROOMS 

The assignment of students to quarters is determined on 
the basis of date of formal application, age, classification, 
and length of time at the School. To obtain a room assigned 
a student must arrive on time. 

( 1 ) Until May 1 st of each year, the applications of present 
students have preference over the applications of prospective 
students in the designation of the choice of room-places for 
the following year. 

(2) Definite room-places are in no case assigned unless 
applications are regularly made for all the room-places in that 
room. If a student who files her application has no prospec- 
tive room-mate with application on file she may be assigned 
to a definite hall, but not to a definite room. 

(3) West Rock is reserved for the younger students. Stu- 
dents who are both below the Freshman Class and less than 
sixteen years of age at the date of entrance are ordinarily 
assigned to West Rock. 

In assigning students to rooms, the Rector does not waive 
the right to change a student at any time from one room to 
another if in his judgment it is best for the order of the 
School. 



86 St. Mary's Bulletin 

COMMUNICATIONS 

All telegrams for the students should be addressed to the 
Rector. 

All letters with regard to the students should be addressed 
to the Rector, but, when desired, communications pertaining 
to their health and personal welfare may be addressed to the 
Lady Principal. 

Correspondence with the home circle is freely encouraged, 
but beyond this there is no time, even were it otherwise de- 
sirable, for letter writing. 

DRESS 

Parents will confer a favor by consulting simplicity in the 
dress of their daughters, and no dresses of extreme cut may 
be worn. 

All students are expected to wear simple white dresses at 
Commencement and at all public entertainments given by 
the School. 

Dressmaking should, so far as possible, be attended to 
at home, as there is neither time nor opportunity for it while 
at St. Mary's. 

HEALTH PRECAUTIONS 

Students exposed to contagious diseases should not return 
to the School without previous consultation with the Rector. 

The Rector strongly advises inoculation for immunity 
against smallpox and typhoid, to be administered at home 
during vacation before entering the School. 

All dental work should be attended to before the student 
comes to School. 

FOOD 

It is a universal experience that boxes of food constantly 
cause sickness, hence the rule that students may receive one 



St. Mary's Bulletin 87 

box of food at Thanksgiving and one at Easter. Food sent 
at other times will be sent to the City Hospital. Candy may 
be sent occasionally, fruit at any time, and a cake at the 
student's birthday. 



POCKET MONEY 

The School cannot pay bills or advance funds to students 
for any purpose unless a special deposit has been made for 
that purpose. A monthly allowance, limited in amount, to 
be deposited with the School and paid to the student weekly 
is recommended, as tending to give the student a proper sense 
of the value of money and of responsibility in the use of it. 

Students are expected to deposit money in the School 
Office. 

No valuables should be brought to the School. 

Bills mast positively not be contracted at the stores, and the 
merchants are notified to this effect. 



GENERAL DISCIPLINE 

With regard to discipline it is desired to have as few rules 
and to grant as many privileges as possible. But in so large 
a community the rules must be obeyed and enforced uni- 
formly and the privileges must be withdrawn if they are 
abused or work injury to the individual and the School, 
and it must be remembered that no privilege can be allowed 
to any one which could not, under similar circumstances, be 
allowed to all who ask for it. In working together for the 
good of the whole School both parents and the School authori- 
ties will in the end succeed best in securing the good of each 
individual. 



88 St. Mary's Bulletin 

REQUISITES 

Boarding students are required to bring with them — 
Bed-linen for single bed. 

4 sheets, 63x90. 

3 pillow-cases, 19x34. 

2 counterpanes, white. 

1 pair blankets. 
6 towels, 
Cloak or cape, 
Umbrella, 

At least one pair of stout high shoes, 
Overshoes. 

These, and all articles of clothing, must be distinctly 
marked with the owner's name. 



GYMNASIUM COSTUME 

For use in the Physical Training classes each member of 
these classes is required to have 

One pair of full, black bloomers, 
Four all white middy blouses, 
One black \erchief tie, 
Three pats of black cotton stockings, 
One pair of leather gymnasium shoes. 

The shoes will be properly fitted and furnished at the 
School; the other requirements should be provided before 
leaving home and brought to the School by the student. 

Students are asked to send by parcel post not later than 
September 1 st the linen for their beds. 




The "Granddaughters of St. Mary's" of 1920-21 grouped on the Chapel Steps. 




Annual Student Exibit in the Art Studio. 



TERMS 

Payments on account mast be made at the dates indicated. 

Fees for the half-year become due in full when the stu- 
dent enters on the half-year and no reduction is made in the 
charge on account of the absence or withdrawal of the stu- 
dent for any reason other than protracted illness of a month 
or more, in which case the parent and the School divide the 
loss equally. 

No allowance is made for withdrawal at Christmas, nor 
within one month of the close of the session, nor is allowance 
made for late entrance. 

A memorandum of the amount due is sent to each parent 
or guardian a few days before the dates of payment in Sep- 
tember, November, January, and March, but failure to re- 
ceive this notice cannot be offered in excuse for delay in pay- 
ment. All bills must be paid promptly when due if students 
are to remain in School. 

Students are not received for less than a half-year or the re- 
mainder of a half-year. Parents are as\ed to give ample 
notice beforehand of intention to withdraw a student at the 
end of a half-year. 

CHARGES AND PAYMENTS 

Entrance Fee: An Entrance Fee of $25 is required of all 

resident students at the time of filing application for entrance, 

as a guarantee for holding place. This fee is in no case 

returned, but on the entrance of the student is credited to 

i her Incidental Account, as a deposit for books, etc. 

General Charges: The general charge for the School 
year, 1920-21, is $550. For the half-year the charge is 
$350. This includes Board, Room-place, Laundry, Con- 
tingent and Library Fees, and Academic or Business Tuition. 



90 St. Mary's Bulletin 

No reduction is made when the resident student has only 
one or two studies in the Academic Department. 

An additional charge of $25. is made when students take 
one or more studies in the Business Department in addition 
to their studies in the Academic Department, and vice versa. 

An allowance of $25 in the charges for the year for each 
student is made when two sisters are in attendance at the 
same time. 

PAYMENTS 

General Charges: A payment of $250 is required on or 
before the date of entrance. 

A second payment of $ 1 00 is required by December 1 st. 

A third payment of $100 is required by the beginning of 
the second half-year. 

The final payment of $100 is required March 25th. 

Special Fees: After the student's course has been arranged 
a memorandum of the fees in the special departments (Music, 
Art, Elocution, Home Economics) is sent the parent or 
guardian and payment for the first half-year is required Oc- 
tober 1st. 

Payment for the second half-year is required at the be- 
ginning of the half-year. 

When a student enters upon studies in the special depart- 
ments during the session, the account is due when rendered. 

Incidental Account: On the student's entrance the $25 
Application Fee is credited to her Incidental Account. Fur- 
ther payments on this account are requested only as needed. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 91 

SPECIAL CHARGES 

FEES IN THE MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

(Each pupil receives two half-hour lessons each week in 
the branch of Music she is pursuing. She is also required to 
take a course in Theory, two half-hours a week, which is 
included in the charge. Students of Voice are also members 
of the Chorus, two half-hours a week, which is included in 
the charge. Pupils in Piano, Voice and Organ are entitled 
to one hour's use of piano or organ each day for practice 
without additional charge.) 

CHARGES FOR THE SESSION 

For Lessons from the Director $100 

For Piano Lessons $80 or 90 

For Voice Lessons 90 or 1 00 

For Violin Lessons 80 

For Organ Lessons 90 

The use of Piano for one hour's practice each school day 
during the session is included in the charge for Piano and 
Voice Lessons. Use of Piano for more than one hour 
daily is charged at the rate of $10 per hour for the session. 

The use of Organ for one hour's practice each school day 
during the session is included in the charge for Organ. Use 
of Organ for more than one hour daily is charged at the 
rate of $20 per hour for the session. 

Where the pupil takes more than one branch of music, 
there is a reduction of $ 1 for each branch after the first. 

FEES IN THE ART DEPARTMENT 

First Year Work (Drawing, etc.) $40 

Second and Third Year Work 60 

Painting in Oil or Water Color, etc. 

Tuition in History of Art 10 

Work in special classes at special rates. 



92 St. Mary's Bulletin 



FEES IN THE BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 
Full Tuition $60 

This includes any or all of ihe business branches, with English and Arith- 
metic. No reduction is made for a partial course except as follows: 

Typewriting alone $25 

Bookkeeping alone 25 

These fees include the use of typewriter for practice. 



FEES IN THE EXPRESSION DEPARTMENT 
Private Lessons $60 

Two half-hour lessons each week. 

Class Lessons (in small classes) $25 

No charge is made to Expression pupils for the work in Dramatics done 
in connection with the regular lessons. 

FEES IN THE HOME ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT 
Tuition in Home Economics A (Cooking, etc.) $30 

The Laboratory Fee to cover the cost of supplies is additional and will be 
about $5.00 for the year. 

Tuition in Home Economics B (Sewing, etc.) 20 

Materials furnished and charged at cost on the Incidental Account. 

OCCASIONAL FEES 

Laboratory Fee. — A fee of from $3 to $5 is charged 
students using the Science Laboratory. 

This fee is to cover cost of material and varies with the course. 

Graduating Fee. — A fee of $5 is charged each student 
receiving a Diploma in any department; and a fee of $2 is 
charged each student receiving a Certificate. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 93 



INCIDENTAL CHARGES 

These are not properly school charges, but are simply 
charges for materials or money which the School furnishes 
to the student as a convenience to the parent. 

A statement of the Incidental Account is sent quarterly. 

Parents will make an Incidental Deposit to cover the cost 
of materials bought by the School and furnished the students, 
and are requested also to provide pocket money. As these 
charges will vary with need, no definite statement can be 
made, but ordinarily $50 for the year will be sufficient in 
addition to the allowance of pocket money. 

Books and Stationery, Sheet Music and Art Materials, 
Gymnasium Shoes, Drug Bills, and Laboratory Fees are 
charged to the Incidental account. 

It is advisable that the pocket money should be furnished 
only through the School, and it is urged that the amount 
should not much exceed one dollar a week. Too much 
spending money is pernicious. It is against the tradition and 
standard of St. Mary's School. 



EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF GENERAL 
CHARGES 

The general charges given in concise form on page 89 may be further 
explained as follows: 

Academic Tuition. — The charge is the same for a full 
course or a partial course. 

Laundry. — The regular charge for the year covers an 
average of $1.75 worth of laundry each week, or $56 worth 
for the year, at regular laundry prices. Additional pieces are 



94 St. Mary's Bulletin 

charged extra at half rates. Laundry lists with prices will 
be sent on request. Pupils are expected to limit the number 
of fancy pieces. 

Medical Fee. — This fee, which is included in the regular 
charge, entitles boarding students to the attention of the 
School Physician in all cases of ordinary sickness, and to 
such ordinary medical supplies as may be needed, without 
further charge. Cases of major surgery, however, and spe- 
cial treatment of eyes, ears, etc., and dental services are 
not included, and the expense of these, when necessary, must 
be borne by the parent or guardian. It is understood that 
any patron may, if so inclined, pay a special fee to the 
School Physician, in cases of extraordinary or long con- 
tinued sickness. All special prescriptions are charged extra. 

The following statement with regard to the School Phy- 
sician was adopted at the May, 1914, meeting of the Execu- 
tive Committee: 

"The health of the School is under the charge of the 
School Physician, and all boarding students are under his 
care, but with the previous consent of the Rector and the 
School Physician some other reputable physician may be 
called in to meet the School Physician in consultation." 



SCHOLARSHIPS IN ST. MARY'S 

In order to receive the benefit of any scholarship paying 
more than $50 a year the scholarship holder is expected to 
fulfill the following conditions : 

1. She must by examination enter at least as high as the Fresh- 

man class of the "College" without conditions. 

2. She must take at least fifteen points of college work each year. 

3. She must take a regular course in the "College" leading to 

graduation. 

4. She must each year do such work and conduct herself in such a 

way as to receive the recommendation of the Rector for con- 
tinuation or reappointment as a holder of the scholarship. 

5. Scholarship girls must file regular application papers; must pay 

the Application Fee by August 1st; and must pay promptly 
when due such proportion of cash as is required over and 
above the amount the scholarship provides. 

These rules have been in effect for a number of years. 
The regularly established scholarships in St. Mary's are as 
follows : 

COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 

1. The David R. Murchison Scholarship, endowed 1903 

($300). (For the Diocese of East Carolina.) 

2. The Smedes Memorial (Alumnae) Scholarship, endowed 

1904 ($270). 
These scholarships, when vacant, are filled by competi- 
tive examination of qualified applicants. They will next be 
vacant for the session of 1920-21. 

NON-COMPETITIVE SCHOLARSHIPS 

(A) Clergy Scholarships. For daughters of the clergy. 
Not limited in number. Allotted by the Rector of 
St. Mary's. To these scholarships only Conditions 
4 and 5 above apply. The value of each of 

these scholarships is $ 1 00 for resident students. 



96 St. Mary's Bulletin 

(B) 1. Raleigh City Schools Scholarships. ($75 each.) 

One filled each year. The holder nominated by 
the Superintendent. 

2. Mary Rufjin Smith Scholarship of the Diocese of 

North Carolina. ($50). The holder nominated 
by the Bishop of the Diocese. 

3. Mary Cain Scholarship. The holder designated by 

the Rector with preference to the descendants of 
the said Mary Cain. ($50.) 

(C) 1. Mary Ruffin Smith Scholarships of the Diocese of 

North Carolina. (Two, $250 each.) The hold- 
ers nominated by the Bishop of the Diocese. 

2. Mary E, Chapeau Scholarship of the Diocese of 

North Carolina. ($250.) The holder nomi- 
nated by the Bishop of the Diocese. Primarily 
for daughters of the clergy. 

3. Mary E. Chapeau Scholarship of the Diocese of 

East Carolina. ($250.) The holder nominated 
by the Bishop of East Carolina. Primarily for 
daughters of the clergy. 

4. The Madame Clement Memorial Scholarship. 

($250.) The holder nominateed by the Presi- 
dent of the Board of Trustees after conference 
with his fellow Bishops of the Board. 

5. The Eliza Battle Pittman Scholarships. (Two 

$250 each.) The holders residents of Edge- 
combe County, North Carolina. Nominated by 
the Rector and Vestry of Calvary Church, Tar- 
boro, N. C. 

6. The Martin Scholarship. ($180.) The holder ap- 
pointed by the President of the Board of Trus- 
tees, acting for the Board. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 97 

7. The South Carolina Scholarships. . Provided by 
funds contributed by the Diocese of South Caro- 
lina. The holders residents of South Carolina. 
The appointments made and amount of scholar- 
ships allotted by the Bishop of South Carolina. 

Note. — From the David R. Murchison Scholarship, the Martin Scholar- 
ship, the South Carolina Scholarships, and the Mary Cain Scholarship the 
School receives annually the cash amount credited to the holder of the scholar- 
ship. There is no cash return to the School in the case of the other scholar- 
ships. 



THE ALUMNAE OF ST. MARTS 

OFFICERS OF THE ST. MARY'S ALUMNAE 
ASSOCIATION FOR 1920-21 

Mrs. Thomas Walter Bickett, President Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Nannie B. Ashe, Vice-President Raleigh, N. C. 

Miss Kate McKimmon, Secretary . St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Loula T. Busbee, Asst. Secretary Raleigh, N. C. 

Mrs. Ernest Cruikshank, Treasurer.St. Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 



ALUMNAE COUNCIL 

Mrs. Ashby L. Baker, Raleigh, N. C until 1920 

Miss Gertrude Royster, Raleigh, N. C until 1920 

Mrs. J. S. Holmes, Chapel Hill, N. C unitl 1921 

Mrs. Walter Montgomery, Raleigh, N. C until 1921 

Mrs. J. J. Bernard, Raleigh, N. C until 1922 

Miss Florence W. Slater, New York City until 1922 

and the officers, ex officio. 

Hie Alumnae Association of St. Mary's, which was first 
established in 1880 and meets annually at Commencement, 
has done effective work in aiding the progress of the School. 

In addition to constant assistance rendered St. Mary's by 
the individual members, the Association has completed three 
special works of importance. 

( 1 ) The Foundation of the Smedes Memorial Scholarship 
in St. Mary's, in memory of the founder and first Rector 
of St. Mary's, his wife, and his son, the second Rector, was 
undertaken early in the life of the Association and com- 
pleted in 1903, when an endowment of $4,000 was turned 
over to the Trustees. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 99 

(2) The Enlarging and Improving of the Chapel, around 
which the fondest recollections and deepest interest of the 
Alumnae center, was undertaken in 1904, and the enlarge- 
ment and adornment was completed in 1 905 at a cost of more 
than $3,500. 

(3) The Endowment of the Mary Iredell Fund and the 
Kate McKimmon Fund in St. Mary's the third work of the 
Association was undertaken at the 1907 Commencement 
and the sum reached $5,000 in 1916. 

The Alumnae are organized as far as possible into local 
Chapters in their several cities and towns, and these Chap- 
ters hold semi-annual meetings on November 1st, Founders' 
Day, and May 12th, Alumnae Day, each year. 

There are upwards of 150 active members of the Raleigh 
Alumnae Chapter, and there are active Chapters in New 
York and Baltimore, as well as in many places nearer home. 



o- 



v : 



REGISTER OF STUDENTS 

(The * indicates non-resident students.) 






?r 



SENIOR CLASS 



Anderson, Lucy L. . . . 


....N. 


C. 


Batts, Katharine 


....N. 


C. 


Blanton, Millicent 


....N. 


C. 


Boyd, Catherine 


....N. 


C. 


Cheek, Alice 


....N. 


C. 


Cooper, Nina 


....N. 


c. 


Davis, Sara L 


....S. 


c. 


Duncan, Annie V. . . . 


....N. 


c. 




Fla. 


Higgs, Annie 


....N. 


c. 


Hoke, Mary McB 


....N. 


c. 


Lay, Anna R 


.....N. 


c. 




....N. 


c. 



*Miller, Pauline N. C. 

Moffitt, Mary N. C. 

Rawlings, Margaret N. C. 

Ruffin, Jane N. C. 

Sherrod, Pattie N. C. 

Smith, Adelaide N. C. 

Stone, Audrey N. C. 

Sublett, Eleanor Va. 

Thomas, Eugenia Ga. 

Toy, Jane N. C. 

*Womble, Ruth N. C. 

Yellott, Mary Md. 



Bonner, Elizabeth 
Branson, Elizabeth 
Collier, Susan 
Douthat, Fielding . 



JUNIOR CLASS 



...N.J. 
...N. C. 
...N. C. 
Va. 



Hart, Nancy 

Kirtland, Dorothy . 
Nolan, Elizabeth . . 
Waddell, Katherine 



N. C. 
..Fla. 
...Ga. 

N. C. 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 



*Barber, Harriet . . . 


N. C. 


Blount, Leonora . . . 


N. C. 


*Bowen, Eunice .... 


N. C. 


Brown, Bessie .... 


N. C. 


Buice, Louise 


N. C. 


Carrigan, Elizabeth 


S. C. 




Ga. 


*Deaton, May 


N. C. 


Gareissen, Marietta 


N. C. 


Hale, Elizabeth . . . 


N. C. 




Ga. 


Huske, Margaret . . . 


N. C. 


Hughes, Alice 


N. C. 


*Hill, Pattie G 


N. C. 


*Hill, Randolph .... 


N. C. 




Fla. 



Kent, Florida S. C. 

Lasater, Mary L N. C. 

Long, Hennie N. C. 

*Merritt, Mabel N. C. 

Moore, Caroline N. C. 

Moore, Maurine N. C. 

MacMillan, Jane N. C. 

Nelson, Elizabeth S. C. 

Newman, Mattie Lou Va. 

Pegues, Suzanne S. C. 

Pou, Margaret N. C. 

Powell, Louise N. C. 

Rose, Josephine N. C. 

Tiplady, Eleanor Va. 

Turrentine, Hilda N. C. 

Venable, Frances N. C. 



St. Mary's Bulletin 



101 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



*Adams, Margaret N. C. 

Andrews, Ruth N. C. 

Ashworth, Julia N. C. 

Avent, Estelle N. C. 

Ballard, Elise N. C. 

Ballou, Betsie N. C. 

Baum, Dorothy Md. 

Beckwith, Evelina N. C. 

Blakely, Madge S. C. 

Budge, Helen Fla. 

Cannon, Corrie S. C. 

Chesson, Eva N. C. 

*Cross, Elizabeth N. C. 

*Dargan, Caroline N. C. 

Darst, Elizabeth Va. 

Dougherty, Muriel Col. 

Drew, Dorothy Fla. 

Drew, Vannie Fla. 

Eglestpn, Louise S. C. 

Elliott, Margaret N. C. 

Everett, Mary Louise N. C. 

Forbes, Josephine N. C. 

*Franklin, Mary Page N. C. 

Gales, Jean N. Y. 

Glass, Eva Lee Fla. 

Harrison, Virginia N. C. 

Hart, Emily N. C. 

Hines, Elizabeth N. C. 

Hines, Rebecca N. C. 

Hutchinson, Sue S. C. 

Hutson, Edith Fla. 

Johnson, Thelma N. C. 

Johnson, Virginia N. C. 

Lamb, Matilda N. C. 

Lambeth, Caroleen N. C. 

Landis, Hamlin N. C. 



*Lawrence, Elizabeth 


.N. 


C. 


Lenoir, Hallie 


,N. 


C. 


Lewis, Ellen 


.N. 


C. 


*Lumsden, Elsie 


.N. 


C. 


Leak, Mary 


.N. 


c. 


*Morgan, Mary Strange . . . 


.N. 


C. 


Mountcastle, Frances 


.N. 


C. 


McCabe, Margaret 


.N. 


c. 


Nixon, Dorothy 


.N. 


c. 


Nixon, Marjorie 


.N. 


c. 


Norfleet, Mabel 


.N. 


c. 


Palmer, Phoebe 


.N. 


c. 


Powell, Lenore 


.N. 


c. 


*Raney, Margaret 


.N. 


c. 


Roberts, Elizabeth 


.N. 


c. 


Simmons, Lena 


.N. 


c. 


Smart, Pearl 


.N. 


c. 






Speed, Ellen 


.N. 


c. 


Steam, Elizabeth 


.N. 


c. 


Swett, Doris 


.N. 


c. 




Ala. 


Taylor, I die Kerr 


.N. 


c. 


Taylor, Susie 


.N. 


c. 


Thacker, Evelyn 


.N. 


c. 


Thomas, Elizabeth 


..S. 


c. 


Thompson, Minette 


.N. 


c. 


Travis, Mary Ellen 


.N. 


c. 


Tucker, Elizabeth 


.N. 


c. 


Villepigue, Emma 


..S. 


c. 




Va. 


*Williams, Frances 


,'N. 


c. 


Williams, Helen 


.N. 


c. 


Willard, Marjorie 


.N. 


c. 


Wimberly, Mary Bryan . . 


.N. 


c. 


Yarborough, Mary Wiatt. 


.N. 


c. 



PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT 



Aiken, Florence Ga. 

Ambler, Mary S. C. 

Atkinson, Eleanor N. C. 

*Baker. Elizabeth N. C. 

Barton, Fannie S. C 

Battle, Ethel N. C. 

Bell, Lois Va. 

Best, Martha N. C. 

Bethea, Hazel N. C. 

Blount, Dorothy Md. 

*Bonner, Blanche N. C. 



*BoyIston, Adelaide N. C. 

Brock, Lois N. C. 

Browne, Alice N. C. 

Carr, Martina N. C. 

Cary, Jessie Ga. 

Cave, Carroll N. C. 

*Chamberlain, Melissa . . . . N. C. 

Cooper, Daisy N. C. 

Coppage, Edna Md. 

Darst, Marguertie Va. 

Davidson, Anne Va. 



102 



St. Mary's Bulletin 



Davis, Mary Stuart N. C. 

Davis, Vance Md. 

Dixon, Josephine N. C. 

Dodd, Dorothy Ga. 

Dunnock, Lois Md. 

Eagles, Margaret N. C. 

Eagles, Rebecca N. C. 

Eberman, Bettie N. C. 

Eccles, Hope Va. 

Edmundson, Margaret . . . . N. C. 

Edwards, Annie Lee N. C, 

Edwards, Dicie N. C. 

*Fetter, Mary N. C. 

Fitts, Loulie N. C. 

*Flint, Elizabeth N. C. 

Franklin, Grace N. C. 

*Green, Frances N. C. 

Gresham, Martha N. C. 

Hagan, Dorothy Ga. 

'Hamilton, Margaret N. C. 

Hammett, Margaret S. C. 

Hannah, Eloise N. C. 

Hardy, Lucille N. C. 

Heath, Ella Crawford S. C. 

Hoyt, Marjorie N. C. 

James, Christine N. C. 

'Jones, Isabel N. C. 

Kaminer, Blanche S. C. 

Kirby-Smith, Carolina .... Mex. 

Kirtland, Anne Fla. 

Lee, Mary Va. 

Lupf er, Lucy Fla. 

'Manning, Annie Louise . . . . N. C. 

Miller, Edith N. C. 

Miller, Frances N. C. 

Mitchell, Janie Love N. C. 



Morton, Alice 


...N. 


C. 


*McCarty, Jean 


...N. 


C. 


Newberry, Harriet 


. ..N. 


C 


Nottingham, Lucia .... 


Va. 


Parker. Beatrice 


...N. 


c. 


'Pendleton, Sylbert 


...N. 


c. 


Powell, Mary 


...N. 


c. 


Rhea, Virginia 


...N. 


c. 


'Robbins, RoeElla .... 


...N. 


c. 


Roberson, Callie Mae. . 


...N. 


c. 


Roberson, Helen 


...N. 


c. 


*Russ, Julia 


...N. 


c. 


Sabiston, Elizabeth .... 


...N. 


c. 


Sabiston, Sarah 


. . .N. 


c 


Scott, Virginia 


...N. 


c. 


Silversteen, Miriam . . . 


...N. 


c. 


Spence, Claire 


...N. 


c 


Springs, Margaret 


...S. 


c 


Stevens, Bessie 


..N. 


Y. 


'Storr, Virginia 


...N. 


c 


Swan, Lucy 


..N. 


Y. 


Tarrant, Florence 


....Ala 


'Thomas, Anna Ball . . . 


...N. 


C. 


Turner, Jane 


...N. 


C. 


Waddell, Winifred ... 


...N. 


c 


Walker, Alice 


...N. 


c. 


'Walters, Macon 


...N. 


c 


'Way, Evelyn 


...N. 


c. 


'Webb, Frances 


...N. 


c. 


Webb. Helen ........ 


...N. 


c. 


Weymouth, Virginia . . 


Va. 


'Whitaker, Marie 


...N. 


c. 


'White, Rea 


...N. 


c. 


Wood, Dorcas 


...N. 


c. 


Wood, Ruth 


...N. 


c. 



BUSINESS CLASS 



Barbour, Grace 


...N. C. 


Higgs, Frances 


Ga. 


Blaum, Ernestine 


....S. C. 


'Horton, Elizabeth . . . 


....N. C 


Burt, Elizabeth 


...N. C. 


Hughes, Evelyn .... 


....N. C. 




Ga. 


Huske, Addie 

Irvin, Sara 


....N. C 


Cooley, Mildred .... 


...N. C. 


....N. C. 


Dawson, Mildred .... 


...N. C 


'Johnson, Charlotte . . 


....N. C. 


Flora, Virginia 


...N. C. 


Jordan, Elizabeth . . . 


Va. 


Graham, Annie Leo . 


...N. C. 


Josey, Mary 


....N. C. 


Grimsley, Irene 


...N. C. 


Keith, Jessie 


....N. C. 


Hale, Elizabeth 


...N. C. 


Lilly, Hester 


....N. C. 


Halstead, Elizabeth . . 


Va. 


McAulay, Iva 


....N. C. 


'Harris, Ruth 


...N. C. 


McCabe, Mary 


....N. C. 


Herrick, Virginia .... 


...N. C. 


'McKethan, Edith . . . 


....N. C. 



5/. Mary's Bulletin 



103 



*McKethan, Irene 
Smythe, Lorraine 
Tayloe, Athalia . 
Thorne, Crichton 



N. C. 


Underwood, Laura . . 


....N. 


C, 




Walton, Lola 


....N. 


C, 


N. C. 


Whedbee, Frances . . . 


....N. 


c. 


N. C. 









SPECIAL STUDENTS 
(all non-resident) 



Albright, Phyllis Piano 

Allen, Pearl Piano 

Andrews, Augusta .Violin 

Andrews, Martha Violin 

Bowen, Isabel Piano 

Duncan, Marian Voice, Home Ec 

Johnson, Frank Piano 

Jones, Carmen Art, Piano 

Kellogg, Mrs. J. W Voice 



Lawrence, Anne Violin 

Maynard, Cary, Jr Violin 

Murchison, Helen Piano 

Pate, Esther Voice 

Stancell, Mrs. W. W Voice 

Standt, Janie Violin 

Williamson, Gladys Voice 

Williams, Howard Voice 

Yates, Elizabeth Piano 



Total Enrollment, 282; Resident Students, 214; Non-resident Students, 6b. 



FORM OF BEQUEST 

"I give, devise and bequeath to the Trustees of St. Mary's 
School, Raleigh, North Carolina, their successors and assigns, 

absolutely and forever (the property given) , 

in trust that it shall be used for the benefit of said school, in 
the discretion of said Trustees, for building, improvement, 
equipment, or otherwise" 

(or) 
"in trust to be invested and the income derived therefrom 
to be used for the benefit of said school in such manner and 
for such purposes as to the Trustees may seem best." 



/ 




Saint 2Har^s 
School 

laleiah, North (Carolina 



UuUrtrn 

Alumna* Number 



December, 1921 Series 10, No. 1 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



ALUMNAE NUMBER 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. C, as Second-class Matter 
Under Act of Congress of July 1 6, 1 894 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Prayers for the School and Alunmre 3 

The Policy of Saint Mary's School Rev. Warren W. Way 4 

A Tribute to the Smedes Rectors Bliss McKlmmon 6 

Saint Mary's School From the "Raleigh Register" 8 

First Impressions of Saint Mary's Helen Powell 9 

Opportunities for Service in Mill Districts Mrs. Ella Teiv Lindsay 11 

My Trip to Europe (A Letter) Miss Clara Fenner 14 

Sketches and Poems : 

Sketches Mary L. Collier, Sarah M. Earrell, Louise Hairston 19 

The Chapel at Night {Verse) Mary Withers 20 

The Cathedral Singer (Sketch) Doris Swett 20 

Sunset on the River (Sketch) Doris Swett 21 

The Sundial (Verse) Elisabeth Lawrence 21 

Beaufort Sketches Lucy Lay 21 

Editorial 23 

School News : 

With the Literary Societies and Clubs 25 

Visitors 30 

Faculty Notes 33 

Alurnnse News : 

Memorial of Mrs. Bettie Austin Badger 35 

Memorial of Mrs. Helen Manly Grimes 36 

Memorial of Mrs. Charlotte E. Grimes 37 

Memorial of Mrs. George H. Snow 38 

News of the Chapters 40 

Marriages 46 

Officers of Saint Mary's Alurnnse Association 48 

Directory of Organized Chapters 48 

Directory of Saint Mary's School Student Activities 49 

The Seventy-ninth Annual Commencement of Saint Mary's School 53 

Faculty and Officers, 1920-21 57 

Saint Mary's Girls of 1920-21 59 



Saint SHary's School Bulletin 

Alumnae Number 
December, 1921 Series 10, No. 1 



Prayers Used at the School on Founders' Day and on Other Occasions 

Changed Only to Permit Then* Use by the Alumnae 

in Their Several Meetings 

O God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, Saint 
Mary's School, its Alumnae and members, with Thy love and favor ; enlighten 
our minds more and more with the light of the everlasting Gospel ; graft in 
our hearts a love of the truth ; increase in us true religion ; nourish us with 
all goodness ; and of Thy great mercy keep us in the same, O blessed Spirit, 
whom, with the Father and the Son together, we worship and glorify as one 
God, world without end. Amen. 

Almighty God, the fountain of all wisdom, who hast taught us, in Thy Holy 
Word, that to know Thee, the only true God, and Jesus Christ, whom Thou 
hast sent, is everlasting life ; we humbly beseech Thee to receive our prayers 
and supplications which we now offer unto Thee for our schools and colleges 
throughout this land. Grant that they who teach and govern in them may 
perceive and know what things they ought to do, and may also have grace 
and strength to fulfill the same ; and to those who are taught and trained, 
give Thy gracious help, that they may acquire such knowledge as may fit 
them for the stations in life to which they may be called, and above all things, 
may receive instructions of heavenly wisdom and know the things that belong 
unto their peace. Grant this, O Heavenly Father, for Jesus Christ's sake, 
our Lord. Amen. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



The Policy of Saint Mary's School 

Waeren W. Way 

My first word shall be one of grateful acknowledgment for the 
chance to stress certain leading ideas in what seems to me a desirable 
policy for the future of Saint Mary's School. 

Saint Mary's is a Junior College. In our case junior college means 
a high school of four years and two years of collegiate character. 

My own conviction is that our best wisdom is to adhere to this 
scheme ; certainly for the present, and especially with regard to our 
two years of college work. The junior college has a place. It needs 
neither apology nor defense. The advantages of the junior college 
are manifest enough upon a mere setting them out in words. Two 
main considerations appeal with great force to many parents and 
students. The junior college of the best type offers a plan of educa- 
tion possible to many who because of limited finances cannot send 
their daughters to a standard four year college. To the junior college 
they turn on the principle that half a loaf is better than none. Again 
of those parents and students too that could afford both time and 
money for the sober pursuit of learning through four years of college 
life there are some, and they are not few, who feel unwilling to do so, 
but are willing to put in two years of sustained endeavor to improve 
upon the education given in a good high school. It is said that a 
little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Perhaps they feel that too 
much knowledge is also a dangerous thing or a weariness to the flesh. 
To these also the junior college offers the desired opportunity. 

Another weighty reason in the minds of many parents keenly con- 
cerned for their daughters' welfare is that in the junior college a 
more home-like atmosphere is found and a greater protection thrown 
around a young student. They feel that it is better for the girl still 
in her teens to gain two years of study, of discipline, of responsibility, 
and two years of added age before passing out into the wide freedom 
of college life. Because of these considerations and perhaps others, 
singly or in combination, the junior college seems to have come to 
stay, and not only to stay, but to flourish. 



Saint Maky's School Bulletin 5 

If the foregoing argument is sound it would seem wise to seek for 
the finest possible development for Saint Mary's School as a junior 
college. We think indeed that we may feel a pardonable pride in 
the present condition, character and reputation of the school, the 
chief share of which is due to the labors and influence of men and 
women who have passed to their eternal rest, or passed from the 
present scene. And yet the sense of gratitude for the past and a 
measure of pride in the present need not and must not debar us 
from dreams, ambitions, and plans for a yet brighter future. Forward 
or backward ; there is no escape from that choice — backward or 
forward. 

In sum, then, we may formulate a rational and ideal policy, as I 
see it, in these terms. We should try to keep and improve our build- 
ings in the line of physical comfort and convenience. We should 
enlarge our library both in space and in books. We should develop 
our scientific equipment. We should provide a special building for 
this purpose furnished with apparatus for the proper study of 
Physics, Chemistry and Biology. To our present excellent staff of 
teachers we should add several more quite competent to teach fresh- 
men and sophomores in a college for women of the very first rank, 
and do it with some degree of indisputable distinction. Will our 
friends help to put these plans into effect % 

Finally, we should all strive to keep undimmed the lustre of that 
treasure of Saint Mary's School, the spirit of its founders, the very 
soul of the place subtle indeed and undefinable, but not the less real, 
fragrant and splendid. It would seem precarious to try to exceed 
that, yet the very condition of keeping faith with such an inheritance 
as ours is the steadfast resolve to struggle not onward only, but 
upward too. 

This is my message to our alumnae, always Saint Mary's girls, scat- 
tered it may be far and wide, but their hearts always with the old 
school in the grove on the hill. Saint Mary's hesitates not to claim as 
her own the ideal expressed in that noble motto : "For Christ and the 
Church." 

November 12, 1921. 



Saint Maky's School, Bulletin 



A Tribute to the Smedes Rectors 

By the Oldest Inhabitant of Saint Maky's 

In compliance with a request from those in charge of the Alumnae 
Bulletin, I have taken pleasure in writing, in gratitude to them, of 
the two men who have had, I may say, the shaping of my life. 

My earliest recollections of Dr. Aldert Smedes date back to my 
childhood, when he was a frequent guest at my father's house, and 
when I came often to Saint Mary's to visit the Smedes children. 

Coming later, in 1861, to Saint Mary's as a pupil, I had as pupil, 
and later as teacher, the privilege of his guidance and influence, 
until his death in 1877, which ended a faithful rectorship of thirty- 
six years. 

As I have no words to express fully my love and admiration for 
Dr. Smedes, I quote from a "tribute" from one who knew him longer 
than I did. Says the writer: "Dr. Aldert Smedes was born on the 
20th of April, 1810, in the city of New York. Dr. Smedes's prepara- 
tion for his life work was at the General Theological Seminary in 
New York. Shortly after his ordination to the ministry, Dr. Smedes 
was called to Saint George's Church, Schenectady, N. Y. The severity 
of the climate of Schenectady forced Dr. Smedes to leave his first 
parish, and before he was again located, he met in New York City, in 
the spring of 1842, Bishop Ives, the second bishop of North Carolina. 
Tradition has it that Bishop Ives said to Dr. Smedes : 'I am anxious 
to open a Diocesan School for girls in Raleigh, but have not found 
a rector.' — that Dr. Smedes answered: 'Bishop, I am your man!' ' 

The strong faith which, throughout his whole life was so evident to 
those who knew him best, and a zeal for good which his whole career 
at Saint Mary's evinced, must have guided him to this step, for in two 
months' time he was in Raleigh, and on May 12, 1842, Saint Mary's 
was opened, with the blessing of God upon it, and through the untir- 
ing zeal and energy of its rector, it passed through the fiery trials of 
the war Between the States (its doors never closing), to carry on its 
work. 



Saint Maey's School Bulletin 



In the management of his school Dr. Smedes was kind, wise, gener- 
ous, just, acknowledging merit, pitying weakness, and demanding 
faithfulness in the teachers and pupils. 

He knew and loved the Scriptures, and so earnest was he in his 
efforts to teach his girls "the things which make for peace," and to 
show them the duties and responsibilities of Christian women, that 
many girls left Saint Mary's imbued with the spirit and zeal which 
make missionaries. 

He loved his work, his girls, his Saint Mary's, and anxious thoughts 
for her future sometimes darkened his latter days, for he had not 
succeeded in his efforts to acquire the property. He did not know 
with what devoted love his son and successors would carry on his 
work, nor that a grateful Diocese would finally make the work its own. 

Only those who were with the Rev. Bennett Smedes, at the time of 
the death of his father, can know with what devoted love he took up 
the work of carrying on the school which he considered a sacred trust. 
Well do I remember his words to the school one morning, shortly 
after Dr. Aldert Smedes's death, when in the chapel with broken 
voice, he said : "I rely upon you to hold up my hands." 

Among the many loving tributes written, I quote from one by one 
of his lady principals, herself a Saint Mary's girl : 

"In our fun and in our work, however, the real influence of the 
school, an influence which inspired the devoted love of the students 
and which left its indelible impress on our lives, was the personality 
of the rector, and of the teachers who were his loyal and ready 
helpers. Real motive power is not always discernible at close range, 
but looking back to those days now, with the clearer view of mature 
years, we know that the centralizing force was the unswerving nobility 
of Dr. Bennett Smedes's ideal of and for women, his entire merging 
of self in the purpose of his work and his unsurpassed reverence for 
spiritual things." 

Gladly would I share with all "Saint Mary's Girls" the privilege 
of my long acquaintance with these two devoted men. God grant 
that our dear Saint Mary's may ever be blessed by the influence of 
their life-work. 



Saint Mart's School Bulletin 



"Saint Mary's School" 

"We cannot permit this flourishing female institution to commence 
its seventh session (some one has scratched out 'seventh' and inserted 
'twenty-fifth') without at least saying, what we most sincerely believe, 
that its superior cannot be found in the United States. This is 
strong language, but will be endorsed by all, we think, who have any 
personal knowledge of the manner in which the institution is con- 
ducted. It is not necessary, we know, to say a word in its favor with 
a view to invoke public patronage, for that has been extended to a 
degree of liberality that leaves nothing to be desired. But it is proper 
that Mr. Smedes, the Rector, should know that his indefatigable 
efforts to advance the cause of Female Education are duly appreciated 
and honored throughout the State. 

"The faculty of communicating knowledge to youth, in the more 
effectual manner of exciting the powers of their minds, so that they 
may always be ready and eager for its reception — the ability to create 
in the pupils a strong interest in studies, let them have in themselves 
an intrinsic interest or not — and above all, the power of commanding 
and regulating a large school, so as to preserve order and discipline 
without scolding or violence, is a peculiar and extraordinary talent, or 
as some would express it, a gift that falls to the share of few men. 
These qualifications, so rare and so valuable, are possessed by Mr. 
Smedes in a most remarkable degree, and is, we are sure, one of the 
main elements of that success which has marked the progress of Saint 
Mary's. 

"We might say much, with truth, of the Rector's uniformly amiable 
and cheerful temper, of his kindness and liberality of feeling, urbanity 
of manners, untiring industry, and of that piety and purity which 
characterizes his every action ; and we would do so were it possible to 
screen this notice from his eye." — Raleigh Register, ^November 13, 
1846. 

The above account of Saint Mary's and its founder was sent to Mr. 
Way by his friend Mr. Burton Alva Konkle, who is at present here in 
Raleigh doing some work in historical research. 



Saint Maky's School Bulletin 



My First Impression of Saint Mary's 

Helen Powell 

It is a very fascinating experience to visit for the first time some 
place about which one has conjured up delightful images. Such was 
my experience when, one September evening, I saw the lights of Saint 
Mary's glimmering through the dark. I felt at once drawn toward 
the friendly warmth which they seemed to suggest, and, as time went 
on, I realized that my first impression contained the keynote of all 
those which followed, for it is in this venerable old school that one 
finds the light and warmth of real friendship. 

As I came up the winding driveway, the lofty Greek columns of 
the main building reflecting the brilliant light within, seemed symbolic 
of the aspirations of the school. Excited voices of girls were heard 
chattering and calling to each other, as they ran to and fro. I was not 
disappointed in my pictures of them, either, for as I registered in the 
office I was met with warmest friendliness and interest. 

I found my lovely room-mates in the dignified old parlor, where 
were hung many fine oil paintings of the bishops, as well as old- 
fashioned landscapes. Everywhere were girls and yet more girls, and 
among them all I noticed the same spirit of cordiality. 

I was conducted to my room by several "old girls." We reached 
it by going through the large, desk-filled schoolroom and down a lofty 
corridor. My room was very large and had two windows through 
which I could see the new moon and the evening star. In the morning 
I noticed that one window looked out upon a picturesque little gray 
chapel with stained-glass windows, and that the other contained a 
vista of the beautiful oak-shaded campus with a square, gray stone 
building overgrown with ivy, near the chapel. I found later that this 
building was called "West Rock, and that my room was in the west 
wing of the main building with the Greek columns, which had im- 
pressed me the night before. 

My first day at Saint Mary's left me with a very vivid impression 
of a well-organized school. It seemed as if at every pause in the 
steady progress of that school morning, another bell was rung and 



10 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

we could not stop at all, but had to rush off to some other class. In 
the afternoon, however, there was more time for really seeing what our 
new home was like. 

By daylight the grove was even more beautiful than it had appeared 
in the soft moonlight of the night before. Girls grouped themselves 
upon the many benches placed in the shade of the trees, ancient oaks 
which looked as if they had stood there for centuries, they were so 
tall and majestic. Little squirrels leaped from limb to limb, and 
scampered over the ground, and birds were singing gaily in the leafy 
branches. As I sat down to rest under one of the shady oaks I saw 
before me the stately Main Building, its red brick walls covered with 
clambering vines, and the rose gardens on either side of the lofty 
portico. West Rock and its twin, East Bock, faced each other upon 
left and right, almost smothered by the ivy and rose vines which 
clung to their gray walls. 

Farther away on the right I could see the Auditorium like a well- 
built theater, and I realized what a fine thing it was to have such a 
splendid building for entertainments and student activities. As I 
gazed, a sense of age, of ideals and traditions long established seemed 
to pervade the atmosphere, and the charm of the place was borne in 
upon me like an influence for good. 

I had often heard that at Saint Mary's tradition held undisputed 
sway. I had been told about the revered customs of the school, and I 
saw clearly now what they had created, the real Saint Mary's girl — 
sweet, idealistic, kind, obliging and courteous. From that first day 
I felt as if we were all in the same large and happy family, for here 
there were few of the petty little disturbances to be found in many 
of the smaller schools where clique spirit prevails. 

At last our first day, filled with quickly-formed friendships, lessons, 
and the novel experience of school routine, came to an end. It was 
twilight, and we went to the little chapel for the evening service. 

As I heard the voice of the minister in prayer, and the music of 
many voices singing, the peace of that hour seemed to close around 
me, bringing with it rest, and I realized that it was the end of a 
happy day in a wonderful school which was now to be my school 
always. I had at last found my ideal, and I could wish for nothing 
more. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 11 

Opportunities for Service in Mill Districts 

Ella Tew Lindsay 

The subject you have assigned to me presents a rash field of possi- 
bilities, and I wish indeed that I had the pen of a ready writer. 
However, I will do my best to show some of the opportunities that 
an earnest worker will find ready to her hand and heart in the mill 
districts. 

Our mill people are just like other people, minus some opportuni- 
ties that others more fortunate have had. Some of them dress well, 
have attractive homes, and their children look like city folk, even, in 
the case of the girls, to puffed and bobbed hair and faces whitened and 
painted. Our least attractive class of help come to us fresh from the 
mountains. They have further to travel on the road to progress, but 
the material is good, and all alike need help of some sort. 

I think if I could choose only one helper for a mill town it would 
be a Christian trained nurse. Her opportunities for service touch 
almost all the needs of humanity. The mill people can manage so 
long as the family remains well, but when sickness comes their need 
is great. 

A trained nurse can give the patient attention and supervision, show 
the family how to prepare food for the sick, keep her and the house 
clean, and give words of comfort and instruction that may change the 
entire atmosphere of the home. 

The next choice of a helper in the mill town would be a worker to 
direct the activities of the young folks. If you wish to develop 
people, catch them while they are young. 

These young people have plenty of life and a pep," and they 
need some wise, yet lively and sympathetic leader to help them have 
a good time in the right way. They enjoy hikes on Saturdays and 
holidays, wiener roasts, Hallowe'en parties, box suppers, little plays 
gotten up among themselves, in short all the things other normal 
young folks enjoy. But, being in the mill, they have not the time to 



12 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

plan these things, nor in many instances, the training to carry out the 
more difficult ones alone. Here is where one opportunity for service 
comes to those seeking to help the mill people. 

A deeply interested teacher who loves the children and her work 
among them, can, with simply the money she gets, be a tremendous 
force for good in a mill town. The mill children as a rule love their 
teacher, and are more easily controlled than the children of the city 
schools. Going to school is an event of great interest and import- 
ance in their lives. 

In most mill schools the teachers interest themselves in providing 
good reading matter for the children, copies of fine pictures to hang 
on the school room walls, and if a piano is needed, they spare neither 
time nor trouble to raise the money with which to purchase it. 

The children learn politeness in the schools, and the teachers try 
to inculcate high ideals in these little ones who sometimes come from 
homes where enough to eat, enough to wear, and a place to sleep con- 
stitute the summum bonum of life. They also visit the mothers of the 
children and in many instances get them to come to the school building 
to listen to experts who lecture on the feeding of infants, dangers of 
unscreened houses, care of the teeth and other vital subjects. 

Teaching night schools for illiterates is a form of service that ranks 
high in the mill villages. Some are too ignorant even to realize how 
much they need teaching, but it is touching to see with what eagerness 
others avail themselves of the opportunity. I recall one fellow, twenty- 
two years old, who comes patiently twice a week for three or four 
months to an equally patient teacher. She told me that she had never 
had quite such an experience, for the boy was not only phenomenally 
dull himself, but had upon him the weight of generations of illiterate 
ancestors and his progress was slow beyond belief. At the end of the 
fifth month, I think it was, he could sign his name and read haltingly 
in the First Reader. But the change in the boy himself was wonderful. 
He joined a Sunday school class composed of the nicest boys in the 
village, wore good clothes and escorted the elite among the girls to 
parties, in short was a changed man, in externals at any rate. So 
much for an education ! 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Any one who can do plain cooking and sewing easily and well and 
teach others to do them would find her talents most available among 
the mill girls, or, perhaps I should say, among the girls from ten to 
fourteen who have not begun to work in the mill. Many of the mill 
people are good cooks and clever seamstresses, but others know nothing 
about either, and the children are eager to learn, particularly when, 
after a cooking lesson, they are taught to arrange a table neatly and 
attractively and allowed to sit down and eat the results of their labors. 

To me, who have had no special training along the lines of serv- 
ice that I have mentioned, but whose lot has been cast in a mill dis- 
trict, let me suggest that as a teacher in a Sunday school in the village 
she can do a great work. As a rule these schools are poorly supplied 
with teachers. Of educated teachers there is almost a total lack, and 
there is no limit to the good that a consecrated teacher can do. Here is 
an influence that goes down through generations. 

And lastly, let me suggest as a means of service to the mill people, 
just friendly visiting with no suggestions of patronage which they 
naturally and rightly resent. Talk to them about all the little inter- 
ests that are theirs — their gardens, their chickens, their cows, their 
children. Their outlook perhaps is narrow, but you will learn from 
them many a lesson of neighborly kindness, of unselfishness, of patient 
endurance of ills under which you would faint and fall. ISTo training 
is needed for this last, only a fact which comes to you when you really 
love God, and your neighbor as yourself. 

I have written not as a sociologist, or even as a trained worker, 
but as one who has lived many years among the mill workers and is 
proud to number them among her friends. 

In the years to come may not a few of St. Mary's daughters seeking 
opportunities of service, listen to the call from the mill districts and 
help to render brighter and fuller the lives of these fine people ! 



14: Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



My Trip to Europe 

Dear Alumnae : — 

I feel inspired to write to you all, and tell you about my trip last 
summer to Europe. It was my sixth trip, but the first one since the 
war. 

I found conditions very much changed in many ways, especially 
the prices. They were doubled everywhere, and more than doubled 
on the steamer. I went to chaperon Ella Rogers, of Florence, S. C, 
one of the old "Babes," and we really put in three wonderful months. 

We took the new Cunard Steamer, the Albania, going over. We 
met a mixed crowd of people — not so many tourists as just people 
going home to visit, with almost forty noisy children. We had two 
delightful English nurses in our state room, with whom we chummed. 
The passage was smooth, and the sunsets unusually beautiful. The 
usual games were played, games never heard of except on shipboard, 
and the trip ended with a concert and dance — a very pleasant voyage. 
We landed at Liverpool and went direct to London, where my spirits 
got gayer and gayer. We did all the usual sight-seeing, besides having 
some social fun with the "Jeudwines" and the "Muirheads" (Mary 
Clench). We also met the two English nurses, and had "tea" at 
Strand Corner, and we patronized the Chop Houses, too, enjoying in 
addition to chops, the large, luscious English strawberries. 

Our big thrill in London was seeing Albert and Elizabeth of Bel- 
gium, who were paying a visit to George and Mary. It was a grand 
sight, and I want to tell you all right now, that Queen Mary had a 
new hat, not the usual one perched up high with a feather, but a most 
becoming toque. 

We were traveling in England and Scotland during the coal strike, 
so the trains were filled to overflowing and you never were quite cer- 
tain whether you would reach your destination or not. However, we 
saw Cambridge, the university town, and Ely, Peterboro, and Lincoln 
cathedrals. I have seen a great many cathedrals in England, but I 
think Lincoln is the most beautiful and satisfactory, perfect in every 
detail, including the "Imp." 



Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 15 

Scotland was very attractive, and the visit to Abbotsf ord, delightful. 
We came back to London by way of the so-called English Lake Dis- 
trict, where Wordsworth, Coleridge and Southey had their homes, and 
poetic inspirations. We motored all through the most beautiful coun- 
try, lake and mountains combined. As scenery it can't be beat. One 
feels that nothing could be more beautiful than Old England. 

We then crossed the Channel, and went direct to Paris in one day. 
We stayed there ten days, and it was very hot. We saw all the sights, 
besides several extra art exhibits and Versailles. We went to Bordeaux, 
and on our way met two charming Belgian ladies of the Belgian 
nobility, with whom we hob-nobbed, and with whom we made our visit 
to the "Shrine of Lourdes." 

Of course, every one knows the legend of how the Virgin appeared 
in this grotto, to little Bernadette, a shepherdess, and told her to 
scratch the rock and water would flow, and whoever drank and bathed 
in this water, would, by faith and prayer be cured of his bodily 
ailments. She appeared three times to Bernadette, and told her to 
build a church above the grotto — this in due time was done — so there 
are two churches, one above the other, the great white basilica reach- 
ing high toward Heaven. The grotto is full of crutches, trusses, etc., 
and many miracles are performed there. To me, it was one of the 
most thrilling and impressive sights I have ever seen, or imagined. 
The cripples and ill, brought there on rolling chairs and litters, the 
priest and nuns and praying people, the whole atmosphere filled with 
prayer. I went to the grotto often, and I will never forget the Vesper 
Service which they have every night all the year round, out of doors, 
in front of the grotto and "Our Lady of Lourdes." The priest in the 
pulpit, the devout people, the hearty responses and singing, and at 
the end of the service, every one going out with a lighted taper — all 
silent, all filled with the wonder of it all, and the hope that their 
prayers for succor will be answered. A most wonderful experience. 
I did not see a miracle performed while I was there, but heard of two 
soon after I left, which were testified to as being cures by ten physi- 
cians. 

From Lourdes I was tempted to go to another grotto, not a shrine, 
in the Pyrenees Mountains. We walked over it for two hours, seeing 



16 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

all the curious stalagmite and stalactite formations, and going up 
and down slimy, slippery, muddy steps. I thought my day had surely 
come, and I was terribly crippled, but it was interesting in a high 
degree. We happened to stop over after leaving Lourdes at Dax, a 
hot water resort. Pure luck for me. I had hot baths in stone sarco- 
phagi and drank hot water (I loathe hot water) and in two days I 
was cured and ready to journey on to Spain. The trip through the 
Pyrenees mountains and valleys was most beautiful, by night with 
full moon, and up as late as 2 a. m., at each village, everybody from the 
grandmothers to infants in arms were at the station. In Spain and 
Italy it is the custom to take long siestas during the hot part of the 
day and to be up and doing in the night season. We got to Burgos, a 
real Spanish town, with a glorious cathedral. One day, Ella and I 
were paying our debts to each other in "pesatas" and trying to reckon 
its value in our money in the cathedral, in a dim corner, when suddenly 
an old woman spied us, stamped her foot at us and shook her fist and, 
pointing to the money, threatened the "Padre" — we flew around sev- 
eral corners and were not gotten by the "Padre" — and we suddenly 
realized our unintentional wickedness of "money changing in the 
temple." An interesting old town, full of history, cradle of Henry IY 
of ISTavarre, we saw a box belonging to the Cid, but he is buried some- 
where else. In Madrid, a beautiful modern town, the most interesting 
place was the Museo Prada ; here we saw works of the greatest Spanish 
artists, Velasquez, Murillo, Goya, Cana — a wonderful collection, and 
the other schools of art were very well represented also. Saragoza, the 
next town, had two cathedrals, an old Gothic and a new Renaissance. 
An affable priest in the new cathedral showed us around, and told 
me of all the languages he spoke — ending up with English and Ameri- 
can English — which, he assured us, were very different indeed. 

From there we went to Barcelona — and here, after doing the town, 
I had my third thrill. A bull fight — a horrible, debasing, brutal 
spectacle, but most interesting ! We borrowed one of the little hotel 
hall boys for an escort and went off gaily, and we saw five bulls and 
fourteen horses killed. We were only due four bulls and twelve horses, 
but in the fourth round, the toreador was "stupido" and could not 
"feenish heem," the bull, as an old Spaniard next to me said, so there 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 17 

was a loud demand for "otro Torros." The disapproval of his stupidity 
was most loud and vociferous. Every one shouted and hissed in some 
way or some language. The old Spaniard yelled "Mucha bad," I 
shouted "Mauvaise" ; the little hall boy, "Malo, Malo" ; so we had to 
see another bull and two more horses killed. Well, I learned a lot 
about toreadors, matadors, picadors and banderillas, etc., and I Jcnow 
it is poor sport and something that an Englishman or American would 
not stand for, but I like to see the sports of other countries, so I do 
not regret having gone to it. 

We took in Nice and Monte Carlo, then on to Genoa and all the 
principal Italian cities and back to Venice, Milan and Lucerne, in my 
most loved place of all, Switzerland, the most gloriously beautiful 
country of all. We were at a lovely hotel right on the lake, and we 
took some mountain trips with an oil king and his wife from Cali- 
fornia — lovely people whose money didn't annoy them or us at all. 
I saw the chapel of my ancestor, William Tell (I adopted him long 
ago when a girl was bragging about being descended from Pocahontas ; 
she asked me "From whom are you descended ?" I said, promptly, 
"From William Tell, we are Swiss.") Stopped at ISTeuchatel, my 
mother's home town, then went through the devastated portion of 
France. This was the only sad part of my trip, and even this sadness 
was lightened by the fact of seeing how bravely the French people 
have overcome difficulties, and for miles and miles the land had been 
leveled and wheat planted, and small truck gardens were flourishing. 
The wire entanglements and camouflaged trains, engines and motor 
trucks, etc., were all scrapped and out of the way as far as possible. 
The trees were pitiful looking, standing up naked and dead, the vil- 
lages, were some of them just heaps of stone, others American shacks 
tacked on to the remaining walls ; but Rheims, the town, beggars de- 
scription. It is low, hardly any building left, just American shacks ; 
and the ruins of the cathedral make one want to cry. The square 
towers are in pretty good shape, but the inside is ruined completely. 
It would be a gigantic task to rebuild it, but I think the French have 
some hopes of doing that some day, for they have brought all the 
original statues to Paris. They are in the Trocodera Museum. 



18 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

We left Rheims for Calais, crossed the channel, went to London 
and thence to Liverpool, where we took the new and elegant boat, the 
"Scythia," of the Cunard Line, for New York. While in Liverpool 
we saw the Walker Art Gallery, a very fine collection of works by 
the Pre-Raphaelites — Burne-Jones, Eossetti, etc. They also have 
an excellent museum. 

Well, we certainly felt that we had done all that could be expected 
of us in the way of art galleries, up-to-date art exhibitions, cathedrals, 
palaces, etc., and we were quite ready to rest. The "Scythia" was fine 
— a new boat on her first trip. The voyage, splendid ; our fare, six 
meals a day, perfect ; the people pleasant, the library full of new 
books, and everything calculated to make life on the ocean wave all 
that it is cracked up to be. The trip was, on the whole, as perfect as it 
could be, and the minor inconveniences, such as lack of water, especially 
ice water, and the train service not being up to pre-war management, 
etc., are all forgotten, while the memories of the good times, and the 
extreme courtesy and politeness of the different peoples make it all 
very well worth while doing. My French, peculiar as it is, was use- 
ful everywhere, and I had no difficulty in getting what I wanted. I 
have now visited in my different trips twelve countries, and at one 
time was able to say, in as many languages, the train instructions, 
"Please do not put your head out of the window," and "Please do not 
spit on the floor." So you see I have a certain amount of versatility 
in the languages. 

!N"ext year I hope to go to see the Passion Play. I saw it in 1910 
— and I wish all of you would come and go along — I'll promise you a 
good time and we will see everything from the Tarantella to the High- 
land Fling. 

Very sincerely yours, 

Claea Fenneb. 



Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 19 



SKETCHES AND POEMS 

I got down on my knees and scrambled furiously under the bureau. 
~Not there ! Heavens ! I wondered where on earth it could be. I had 
searched frantically for almost five minutes in every nook and corner 
of the room, only to find everything else in the world but it. The bell 
rang. I dashed wildly out of the room and down the stairs. Suddenly, 
an inspiration struck me, possibly I had left it in my desk. I hurried 
into the Study Hall. I put my hand into the desk almost holding my 
breath, fearing it would not be there. My hand encountered some- 
thing made of cloth. I sank back, exhausted, but relieved. It was 

my chapel cap. -., T ~ 

J r r Mary Louise (Jollier. 

Bang! There go the opening chords of Mendelssohn's "Wedding 
March." But don't think for an instant that we're having a wedding. 
Oh, no, it's only the nightly serenades in the practice rooms that are 
beginning. From one room there issues the strains of the "Spring 
Song." You can imagine how well this harmonizes with the minor 
scales one young lady is so industriously ripping off. Don't jump ! 
that last crash was only some one getting full value out of Chopin's 
"Polonaise Militaire." There go some more scales accompanying a 
rather lusty voice which is telling any one who cares to listen that her 
love is like a red, red rose. But the one thing that is predominating 
over the whole bedlam is that very classical piece, "Strut, Miss 

Sarah M. Harrell. 

Patiently the little chapel waited under the shadow of the old oak 
trees. Why, it wondered, didn't some one come and open wide its 
doors, letting in the wonderful sunshine and the throng of happy 
voiced girls? Had they not come every morning year in and year 
out, to fill it with sweet clear voices lifted in song, and then hushed 
in prayer and worship % 

Then, while it waited so patiently, the sound of voices drifted 
across the campus. And the little chapel sighed, feeling deserted and 
forlorn. 



20 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



But wait, what was it they were singing ? Faintly it caught the 

"Well, we love the little chapel 
Ever hold it dear." 

And the heart of the little chapel was happy. 

Louise Hairston. 

The Chapel at Night 

Maey Withers 

Little chapel, at night, from my window 

I can see you standing there, 
With the hovering stars above you, 

Shining like jewels thru' the air. 
While the black shadows cast by the oak trees, 

Shift and stir with a gentle sigh, 
While the wind whispers softly around you 

As it wanders caressingly by. 

What does the wind whisper, wee chapel, 

All through the quiet night? 
Does it sigh for the girls long departed 

Far, far beyond our sight? 
Those girls — now grown up to women, 

But ne'er from thy influence fled — ■ 
Fair daughters of dear old Saint Mary's — 

True-blue where'er life has led. 

Throughout our fair land Life has called them 

And of many we know not their fate, 
Yet the lessons they learned at Saint Mary's 

Give them strength to labor — or wait. 
For like friendships begun 'neath their shadow, 

Which enrich and brighten their ways, 
So those lessons of love, truth and wisdom 

Will follow, as guide, all their days. 

The 'Cathedral Singer 

A hush fell over the church as the pure voice of the singer floated 
forth, "The Lord is My Shepherd : therefore can I lack nothing." 
A chance ray of sunlight fell on the boy's face as he sang, making his 
profile look that of an angel. A new wealth of beauty flooded the 
ancient psalm. "But Thy loving kindness and mercy shall follow 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 21 

me all the days of my life." Higher and higher soared the voice until 
the last phrase "I will dwell in the House of the Lord forever" melted 
into the mistiness surrounding the pillars by that vast cathedral. 

DORIS SWETT. 
Sunset on the River 

The sun, a flaming ball of fire, hung low upon the horizon, casting 
its path, its glory, across the river a molten mass of crimson ; shimmer- 
ing, sparkling, ever changing. Outside the realm of light the flowing 
water was shrouded in the blue grey of the evening twilight. 

Boats, resting at anchor became mere vague outlines. Silently out 
from the indistinguishable moved one lone sailboat, crossed the path 
of glory and again melted into the unfathomable. 

Doris Swett. 
The Sundial 

The stmdial in our garden 
Stands out there in the light. 
Always when the skies are blue 
And the sun is shining bright, 
It tells the hours one by one, 
And tells them all just right. 

But once when it was rainy 
With skies all leaden grey, 
I couldn't tell the time 
For the sundial didn't say, 
Because the naughty raindrops 
Had washed the time away. 

Elizabeth Lawrence. 
Beaufort Sketches 

I stopped and gazed, fascinated, at the house of my dreams. I had 
been taking a walk on one of the back streets of a little seaside town 
near my home. It was a tiny little house of one story, with little dor- 
mer windows in the red attic roof. Snow-white it gleamed against the 
green elms. A narrow porch ran almost all around it, ending at a 
little side door at the right. Boxes filled with red geraniums and 
dripping green vines were on the railing. A green hedge with its 



22 Saint Maky's School Bulletin 

glossy leaves just inside the white fence completed the picture of my 
perfect house. I sighed and turned away, it belonged to some one else. 

"MrU-u-llitSj m-u-u-llitSj hawg-fish, trout, spots and flowiders! Fresh 
feesh this mawnin' an' every mawnin'." A block away I heard the cry 
and jumped from my bed to see. The crier must be crazy John Bun- 
yan, of whom I had heard so much. [Nearer came the cry, "Flounders, 
flounders, just caught las' night." I looked out quickly. A tall, 
shambling figure was passing with a wheelbarrow of fish. He was the 
personification of Ichabod Crane in form. His feet were bare and his 
faded blue shirt and overalls ragged. On his head pulled far over his 
deep-set eyes was a tattered felt hat. He pushed his wheelbarrow with 
all the force of his body, almost in rhythm. I watched him until he 
was fairly out of sight, but I could still hear him calling in his reso- 
nant tones, "M-u-u-llits, m-u-u-llits, hawg-fish, trout, spots and 
flounders !" 

"Excuse me, honey, for stopping you, but I wants you to ask your 
poppa something for me. Yes, I wants you to ask him whether there's 
anything in the Bible about snuff or terbacco being sinful to use. 
This revivalist person says it's a sin to dip snuff. Now, if there's any- 
thing between the lids of the Bible about its being a sin I'm a-willing 
to stop it. I know it's a filthy habit, but I can't help it. You see, when I 
was only eight my poppa made me dip. Yes, my teeth pained me and 
he went and brought me some little cedar twigs and he pounded them 
with a hammer to make them soft and he bought me a box of snuff 
and he made me dip it. He was very much afraid my teeth would all 
decay. It's a filthy habit and I knows it, but I'm an old woman and I 
gets a heap of comfort out of it. Well, you run along and ask your 
poppa, he's a minister and he ought to know. I'll sure be much 
obliged. But jest push me that there spittoon, honey, 'fore you leave." 

Lucy Lay. 



Saint Ittary's School Bulletin 



A bulletin published quarterly in December, February, April and June, at 
Saint Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumme. 
Address all communications to 

THE SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN, 
Saint Mary's School, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

ALUMNAE NUMBER, 1921-1922 

Frances R. Bottttm, Saint Mary's School, Editor 

Mary Louise Everett Ebie Roberts 

Lucy Lay Associate Editors MARy WlATT Yarbobough 



EDITORIAL 

To those of the Alumnae of Saint Mary's who have gone out from 
the School within the last twenty years, the editors of this bulletin feel 
that they owe an apology. The old girls will recall with pride and 
pleasure the work and the ideals of the Saint Mary's girls who, while 
here, gave of their time, and energy, and devotion to the activities of 
the Muse Club, and, after leaving, to the publication of the Alumnae 
numbers of the "Muse." They will recall very particularly that the 
work and accomplishments of the club and of the editors of the 
"Muse," was due directly to the unfailing inspiration, aid, and hard 
work of their friend and most patient adviser, Mr. Cruikskank. 
Under his leadership the club grew in numbers and in influence. 
Having now to do without this leadership and inspiration, the Muse 
Club disorganized itself and is no longer an active body at Saint 
Mary's, yet it lives in the hearts of many of those both here and 
away, who have been numbered among its members. 

The editors feel of this bulletin, that it is rather a pitiful failure 
if considered as a substitute which can fully take the place of the 
"Muse." It cannot do that, and makes no pretense of doing so. It is 
rather issued in the hope that it will do something to reassure all 



21 Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 

the Alumnae of Saint Mary's that though one of their dearest friends 
is gone, there are many who love the school and who wish to keep in 
touch with its activities and with its students of the past and present 
— and future. 

The plan for the "Saint Mary's School Bulletin" is, at present, that 
four numbers shall be published in the course of the school year, the 
"Alumnae Number," a "Catalogue Number," a "Students' Number" 
and a "Commencement Number." It is planned also that the Alum- 
nae Register shall be arranged and printed for distribution in order 
to give the Alumnae opportunity to point out the changes that need 
to be made, the mistakes, and the omissions. 

Our thanks and appreciation are due to many of the Alumnae who 
have made this number of the Bulletin possible by furnishing news 
and articles, to many of the girls here at the school, and to Miss Tur- 
ner, our new academic head, without whose aid and suggestions the 
inexperienced editors would never have been so bold as to undertake 
their own particular part of the work. 

For the many mistakes which, we fear, will be found we crave par- 
don and leniency. Correction of all errors and mistakes in news 
items will be welcomed by the editors. 

Wednesday Morning 

It may be assumed that our Alumnae and friends are aware in gen- 
eral of the recent improvements and changes. One change has been 
introduced this year which will be of interest to all former students. 
Every Wednesday morning the entire school, day scholars included, 
march into the Auditorium instead of going to the Chapel. We march 
and sing. With the help of the piano and our good musical leaders 
we all sing, or if you make much of accuracy we all try. There is a 
brief period for devotions, there are notices, of course, some of them 
mildly horrific, but the music is the main attraction. School songs 
and patriotic songs predominate. Some day it may be "Juanita" or 
"My Old Kentucky Home" ; "Carolina," of course. There are grow- 
ing hopes that after a while we shall learn to sing "The Star Spangled 
Banner." 
November 15, 1921. W. W. W. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 25 



SCHOOL NEWS 

On Tuesday night, November 2, Founders' Day, we celebrated in 
the parlor, the program being in the care of the two literary societies, 
the Sigma Lambda and E. A. P. The presidents, Josephine Rose and 
Evelina Beckwith, presided. Mr. Stone gave a very interesting talk on 
the early days at Saint Mary's. The subject touches us every one with 
peculiar interest, because the lives of the founders are a constant 
source of inspiration. The second number on the program was Kip- 
ling's "Recessional," sung by a chorus. The charming quaintness of 
an old-fashioned Saint Mary's was carried on throughout the program. 
Little costumed ladies representing different periods stepped out, 
seemingly from long ages ago, and read extracts from their own spe- 
cial diaries. 1850 was represented by Addie Huske, 1870 by Elise 
Ballard, and finally, and more amusing than the rest because of its 
near modernness, 1910, by Muriel Dougherty. Annette Lawrence 
sang "When Miss Kate Was a Teeny Little Girl," every word of 
which was clear and sweet. Miss Katie herself, as was very fitting, 
closed the meeting by telling us about the chapel as it once was. The 
meeting was then adjourned. 

The first event of our Literary Society year was the joint recep- 
tion by the Sigma Lambdas and E. A. P.'s to the new members in 
the parlor Saturday night, September 24, 1921. 

Since then five regular meetings have been held in the parlor and 
study hall, in which various business was enacted and a delightful 
program followed. On Founders' Day we held a combined society 
meeting which was presided over by both Sigma Lambda and E. 
A. P. presidents. Mr. Stone's delightful talk and the rest of the pro- 
gram all had their bearing on Founders' Day and Saint Mary's of 
long ago and to-day. 

The E. A. P. Society has been organized and has begun its work 
with great spirit and "pep." Miss Cooke, our adviser, has been of very 
great help and the new members add new life to the society. So far 



26 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



the regular meetings have been very successful. The first one, as 
usual, had for its subject Edgar Allan Poe. The next was mainly a 
drill in parliamentary law and the last was the first preliminary de- 
bate. The inter-chapter meetings, especially that on Founders' Day, 
have been unusually successful, and the E. A. P.'s hope for good re- 
sults throughout the year. 

The College Club of Saint Mary's held its first meeting for the year 
of 1921-22 on October 17th. A program was outlined for the coming 
year. As the purpose of the College Club is to further interest in 
higher education and to bring its members into close contact with 
the social, scholastic and religious side of college life, graduates of 
different colleges have been asked to talk to us. It has been planned 
that there shall be a social element to the meetings this year. 

The Sketch Club has had only one meeting, for the election of offi- 
cers. It has been making great progress, however, in the art room and 
a few weeks ago the members participated in a very enjoyable picnic, 
taking along their palettes and brushes for sketching. 

The Granddaughters Club has met and organized. This club consists 
of the girls whose mothers or grandmothers have attended Saint Mary's 
School. The officers elected were Marjorie Willard, president, Addie 
Huske, vice president, and Dorothy Nixon, secretary and treasurer. 
The members of this club are Mabel Hawkins, Virginia Williamson, 
Pauline Taylor, Marjorie jSTixon, Dorothy Nixon, Charlotte Rodman, 
Lucy Kimball, Daisy Cooper, Addie Huske, Erances Green, Elizabeth 
Hickerson, Susan Divine, Mary E. Yarborough, Adelaide Boylston, 
Macon Walters, Laura Marshall, Elizabeth Bose, Mary Thorpe Smith 
and Marjorie Willard. 

The Mu Athletic Association 

The first meeting of the Mu Athletic Association was held to elect 
officers, especially a basketball manager in the place of Mary McCoy 
who, much to our regret, did not return. Van Wilkins was elected, 
leaving her former position, that of volley ball manager, vacant. 



Saint Maky's School Bulletin 27 

After the usual trj-outs the new members were chosen, and the old 
girls were glad to welcome some splendid new members. They all 
showed a fine lot of spirit, new and old. The girls who went 
out for basketball showed the old-time Mu spirit by coming out, 
thirty-five strong, for a practice before breakfast. The Mus are just 
full of pep this year and show their enthusiasm by their presence and 
cheering at the games. Quite unexpectedly the Mus were victorious 
at the bloomer party, for they had only one member of their first team 
against almost all of the Sigma first team. 

Mary Louise Collier and Josephine Gould, the Mu cheer leaders, led 
the rest in the new song and yells which the Mus have this year. The 
Mus won the first team game and lost the third on the 12th of Novem- 
ber. A second team failure on the 19th did not at all dampen the spirit, 
and the Mus are right there with the backing for the teams, and with 
pep and vim to gain the Blue Banner of 1922. 

The Sigma Athletic Association 

The Sigmas began what promises to be one of the most successful 
years in the history of the association with the "Bloomer Party" in 
the gym Saturday evening, October 10th. During the following two 
weeks the teams were chosen with the captains as follows : Minette 
Thompson, first team ; Dorothy Nixon, second team ; and Mary Powell, 
third team. The first double header game was played in the gym 
November 12th. The score of the first team game was 20-18 in favor 
of the Mu team, and the third team game was 22-12 in favor of the 
Sigma team. The second team game was held on Saturday evening, 
November 19th, resulting in a score of 21-14 in favor of the Sigma 
team. There has been a large and enthusiastic attendance at all prac- 
tices, and the spirit that works and wins has been so plainly shown by 
all members of the association, both old and new, that we are looking 
forward to being able, at the end of the year, to hang another "bright 
red banner on the wall." 



28 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

The Hallowe'en Party, October 31, 1921 

The Masque Ball in the gym this year showed more ingenuity and 
originality in the costumes than ever before. The grand march, played 
by Miss Sutton, and led by Misses Mary Louise Collier and Isabel 
Lowry, a black and white Pierot and Pierette, was a gala scene of 
color and variety. 

The Senior stunt was one of the features of the evening. The cur- 
tain was drawn back on the charming scene of a last year's Saint 
Mary's graduate fast asleep in a large chair. While she slept, she 
dreamt — memories came flocking back, ghosts of former happenings in 
a happy school year, spats, a birthday cake, a Victrola record, a beau- 
tiful Easter corsage, then, lastly, a girl going home pulling behind her 
a diploma, the smallest of the senior class. The costumes were appro- 
priate and the verses were witty. 

Next the lights went out — there was a hush of expectation over all 
the gym. A red light glowed in the middle of the floor ; save for that, 
all was a Stygian blackness. Suddenly something white came in, then 
another and another. The seniors had turned into ghosts ! To the 
doleful tune of a dirge began a ghostly weird dance. One by one the 
ghosts went into the middle and threw into the burning caldron the 
thing they disliked the most. Then Miss Isabel Lowry gave a beau- 
tiful little ballet dance. 

The Devil's Cave was one of the most popular resorts of the even- 
ing. There, under the guidance of a wicked red devil, one was led 
through all the terrors of hell— and, oh ! the unspeakably horrible 
things they did to one ! 

The charmingly decorated booths, the haystacks, the pumpkins and 
the hideous witch leaning over her black caldron drawing out the fates 
and fortunes of all who came to seek her, did much to give the scene 
the picturesque and fascinating air it had. 

Much of the success of the party we owe to the "Prep Jazz Band," 
that conglomeration of melody called music, which is heaven in 
our ears. 

Muriel Dougherty. 



Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 29 

On Saturday night, September 24th, the annual reception of the two 
literary societies, Sigma Lambda and Epsilon Alpha Pi, was held in 
the parlor. The old and the new members were met at the door by 
the Rector who was first in the receiving line, composed of the faculty 
and the higher officers of both societies. 

After short talks, made by the presidents, the Sigma Lambda and 
"E. A. P." songs were sung, followed by "Alma Mater." 

During the evening delicious fruit punch and cakes were served, 
and enjoyed by all. H B w 

The Bloomer Party 

Shrieks and screams, yells and songs — "Mu team's going to shine 
tonight." and "When the good old Sigmas fall in line"- — all inter- 
mingled in one grand exhibition of pep, not to be forgotten. The 
old gym rang merrily from corner to corner. The new girls were 
learning what it was, in some cases, to be Sigmas, and in others, what 
it was to be Mus. One thing can certainly be said of them, they en- 
tered into the spirit of the thing and made the Bloomer Party a huge 
success. 

The game between the old Sigma and Mu teams was thrilling from 
beginning to end. Every goal was greeted with deafening cheers. 
A hard fight was put up by both teams, and the first half ended with a 
score of 9 to 8 in favor of the Mu team. This close score increased 
the excitement even more, and the deafening shrieks and yells con- 
tinued. "Who's gonna win, win ?" rang throughout the gym. In a 
second the deafening shrieks were silenced by the blow of the whistle. 
The victory had been won by the Mus, with a score of 16-14. 

Every one feels that, with such a beginning, athletics will be more 
enthusiastic this year than ever before. 

The Three Class Parties 

The Seniors gave a delightful Mother Goose party to the Sopho- 
mores on Saturday evening, October 29, in the parlor. Each Sopho- 
more came dressed as a Mother Goose character and, after the guests 
had arrived, Mother Goose (Miss M. L. Everett), and The Old 
Woman Who Lived in the Shoe (Miss Mary Harding), followed by 



30 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

her children (all the other Seniors), came from the door of a large 
shoe. After Mother Goose had welcomed her gnests a few of them 
were asked to afford some entertainment, and parts were assigned 
to them. 

The most notable form of entertainment was a comedy given by 
the "Fiddlers Three, Freckles, and Little Miss Miiffet." After a 
contest dance refreshments of lemonade, animal crackers and "lolly- 
pops" were enjoyed by all. To each "lollypop" given to the Sopho- 
mores was attached a tiny celluloid goose. 

Music and dancing furnished ample entertainment until the lights 
flashed. Then Mother Goose and her characters were forced to dis- 
appear — probably to jump back to their respective places in the book. 

The same evening the Freshmen enjoyed a birthday party given 
by the Juniors in the lobby, which was most attractively decorated. 
From a large basket covered with orange crepe paper, fixed so as to 
imitate a birthday cake, ribbons were hung. The guests pulled the 
ribbons for prizes, which were peanuts. Then lollypops were served, 
and music, recitations and dancing were indulged in throughout the 
evening. 

At the same time the "Preps" were entertaining themselves with 
a "Tacky" Party in the gymnasium, which was effectively decorated 
as a barn. The music for dancing was given by the "Jazz Band" 
which consisted of some of the musical members of the "Prep" class. 
Ice cream cones and peanuts were generously served for refreshments. 
Each person, before leaving, was presented with a small gift accom- 
panied by a suitable verse. 

After the band had succeeded in making its own party a glorious 
success, it favored the two other parties with a few selections which, 
needless to say, added much to the enjoyment of all. 

Visitors 

Saint Mary's was honored on the night of October 24 by an in- 
formal talk from Bishop Thomas B. Gailor, of Memphis, Tennessee. 
His subject, "Education," was naturally a very appropriate and in- 
teresting one. His short visit was greatly enjoyed. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 31 

Mr. Harding Hughes took the services at Saint Mary's on October 
30. His sermon was interesting and instructive. His keen insight 
into the nature of girls made us feel very uncomfortable at times. 

Mr. Burton A. Konkle gave an entertaining "after-dinner-talk" 
(by his own definition) in Study Hall Thursday evening, November 
10. We were properly awed by the thought that what we heard was 
soon to be published. 

The Sunday afternoon service, November 14, was taken by Arch- 
deacon Frederick B. Drane, successor to the late Archdeacon Stuck, 
from the Yukon- region. Mr. Drane seems near to us because of his 
three sisters who attended school here. There are many surprising 
things to be learned about that far-off land, Alaska, and one that we 
were particularly glad to hear was the account of the work carried on 
by women, as nurses and as teachers. Our prayers go with Mr. Drane 
as he returns to continue the wonderfully self-sacrificing mission in 
which he himself seems more than happy. 

Mr. John Boushall, chairman of the Red Cross in Raleigh, spoke 
in Assembly Monday morning, November 15. The service that Mr. 
Boushall rendered is invaluable, because it is to him we owe a better 
knowledge of the work of that great organization, the American Red 
Cross, and to him that spirit aroused in us which makes us so sure 
that Saint Mary's will pledge another one hundred per cent member- 
ship in 1921, as she has in years before. 

November 20, Mr. Simkins, of Charleston, S. C, paid a visit to 
Saint Mary's, which holds special interest for him because of its be- 
ing his wife's Alma Mater. Miss Katie remembers very well Sally 
Raven Lewis Simkins. 

The girls at Saint Mary's are always glad to welcome "old girls" 
when they come to visit, even if it is only for a few minutes or a few 
hours. 

Among our visitors this year have been : Louise Buice, Hannah 
Lilly, Elizabeth Carrigan, Eunice Collier, Carol Cave, Sallie Bett 
Quinerly, Mary Louise Langley, Alice Walker, Hester Lilly, Eliza- 
beth Nolan, Alice Cheek, Loulie Fitts, Annie Higgs, Elizabeth Gran- 
tham, Athalia Taylor, Lilian Joyner, Nancy Hart, 



32 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

Marie Curtis spent a few hours here on her way to South America 
where she is to be a missionary. 

Mary Louise Langley came to see us just at the right time to help 
"root" at the first Sigma and Mu basketball game of the season. 

Occasionally the "Chapel Hill girls" come over for a week-end in 
Raleigh. Annie Duncan was a bridesmaid at Pauline Miller's wed- 
ding. Elizabeth Lay generally comes on business. The others who 
have been to see us are : Jane Toy, Frances Venable, Catherine Boyd, 
Mary Yellott, Aline Hughes, Ellen Lay and Nina Cooper. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



FACULTY NOTES 

Beginning Sunday, the 9th of October, the centenary of Christ 
Church, Raleigh, was celebrated. Great honor is due Mr. W. H. 
Jones, the organist and choirmaster, for the beautiful music of the 
occasion, which was concluded on Tuesday night with the cantata, 
Whitney Coombs's "Ancient of Days," with solo work by Miss Anne 
Weeks, whose lovely voice was a great addition. 

Mr. W. H. Jones and Miss Florence Davis, teacher of expression, 
so well known in her successful work at Saint Mary's, are coaching- 
plays for the Raleigh Community Players, which will be put on the 
last of November. 

The Dramatic Club, under the supervision of Miss Davis, will 
give "Daddy Long Legs" for its Christmas play. 

Misses Weeks and Southwick appeared at the Woman's Club Fri- 
day, October 28th, Miss Weeks singing a group of Indian songs and 
Miss Southwick accompanying. 

The new members of the faculty for the 1921-22 session are : Mr. 
A. W. Tucker, business manager ; Miss Bertha Morgan, lady princi- 
pal; Miss Sara Clarke Turner, academic head; Miss Susan Reavis 
Cooke, English ; Miss Natalie Ballou, French ; Miss Nancy L. Moore- 
field, Mathematics ; Miss Marguerite Kretschmer, Latin ; Miss Flora 
Mathison, Domestic Science, Domestic Art; Miss Anne W. Weeks, 
Voice. 

A faculty recital was given November 7th in Saint Mary's audi- 
torium by Miss Anne Weeks, soprano; Miss Sue Kyle Southwick, 
pianist, and Miss Florence Davis, reader. This was the first recital 
given by Miss Weeks, who became a member of Saint Mary's music 
faculty this session, and a most successful debut it was. 

Miss Weeks, accompanied by Mr. W. H. Jones, director of music, 
presented a varied program of songs, which disclosed a voice of fine 
texture, brilliant and powerful, splendid technical development, and 
interpretative abilities of rare order. With her charming stage pres- 
ence and magnetic personality, she won her audience from the first. 



34 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

Miss Southwick needs no word of introduction to a Raleigh, audi- 
ence ; she is an established favorite. She gave her interested hearers 
great delight by her exquisite touch and tone as well as by a brilliant 
interpretation of the chosen Chopin pieces. 

Well known, too, is Miss Florence Davis, whose reading of "The 
Florist Shop" was marked by well denned and striking characteriza- 
tion of the persons in the play. Miss Davis's musical voice and ex- 
pressive gestures are notable parts of her most interesting interpre- 
tations. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 35 



3n Mtmxttmm 



Mrs. Bettie Austin Badger 

On April the 4th, Mrs. Bettie Austin Badger, widow of Major 
Richard C. Badger, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Samuel 
F. Telfair, in Cameron Park, Raleigh. 

Born amid affluent surroundings, her girlhood was spent at ''Dal- 
keith" and "Woodlawn," country seats of her family in Warren and 
Halifax Counties, in an environment in every way typical of the Old 
South and its best traditions. Beginning her education under pri- 
vate tutors and entering Saint Mary's School, Raleigh, she re- 
mained at that institution under the fatherly oversight of its revered 
founder, Dr. Aldert Smedes, for a period of five years. Her educa- 
tion was completed in !New York at the celebrated school of Miss 
Haines and Madame de J anon, an institution which enjoyed the 
patronage of many prominent American families. 

Mrs. Badger's deeply religious nature found expression in the 
manifold agencies and activities of her church. A lifetime member 
of the Episcopal Church, well instructed in its tenets, and fortified 
in her last hours by its rites and sacraments, her long life of un- 
selfishness and devotion came peacefully to a close. 

Surviving Mrs. Badger is her daughter and only child, Mrs. Samuel 
F. Telfair; also, two sisters, Mrs. Sally Austin Hamilton, of Balti- 
more, and Mrs. Minnie Haywood Bagiey, of Washington, D. C, and 
an only brother, Mr. Frank P. Haywood, of Raleigh. 



36 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Mrs. Helen Manly Grimes 

It is with sincere sorrow that we record the death of Mrs. Helen 
Manly Grimes which took place on the 3rd of August in her 86th 
year. At the time of her death Mrs. Grimes was perhaps the oldest 
alumna of Saint Mary's School. Born in Raleigh on June the 26th, 
1835, the daughter of Governor Charles Manly and Charity Haywood 
Manly, she grew to young womanhood at the old Manly place at the 
foot of Fayetteville Street, and entered Saint Mary's School in her 
15th year, and until the end of her eighty-six years her love for Dr. 
Aldert Smedes, its founder, was an inspiration that never grew less. 
Unselfishness, self-control, thoughtfulness, courtesy, and a beautiful 
Christian faith were the foundation stones upon which her education 
and her wonderful personality were based. Born and reared amid the 
affluent circumstances and the high tradition that gave to the world 
the splendid women of the sixties, she was, in person, soul, and 
intellect, a most perfect flower of that most gracious time. In 1855 
she was married to Mr. John Gray Blount Grimes and spent the 
years, until he left for service in the Confederate army, at his Swan 
Quarters and Woodland plantations in Pitt and Hyde Counties. Re- 
turning to her father's home in this city for the four years of the war, 
she spent, with the exception of a few years of later absence, the re- 
mainder of her life in Raleigh. Here, from the lovely home she made 
for her husband and two daughters, Olivia Blount and Sophie Manly 
Grimes, the circle of her beneficent inspiration widened with the 
years, for her life touched, revivified, and appealed to the better 
things in places she knew not of, and there were those who loved and 
looked up to her who had never spoken to her directly — whose hearts 
she inspired because of her sheer loveliness of soul and her closer 
vision of Christian charity, which looked ever for good in this life 
and ever beheld the vision of life eternal. 

Strong, sweet, unaffected, exquisitely touching and appealing, from 
the ways of earth has passed the life of a lovely lady of long ago — a 
personality that speaks to the soul and dwells in memory with the 
pure fragrance of an old-fashioned rose. 

M. H. H. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 37 



Mrs. Charlotte E. Grimes 

Mrs. Charlotte E. Grimes, daughter of Hon. John H. Bryan and 
Mary Williams Shepard, and widow of the late General Bryan 
Grimes, was born in Kaleigh January 27th, 1840, and died here 
December 10th, 1920, in the eighty-first year of her age. She was 
educated at Saint Mary's, under the rectorship of Dr. Aldert Smedes, 
where she attended school from 1852 to 1857, and at Mrs. Carpen- 
tier's School in Philadelphia. At the time of Mrs. Grimes's death, 
she was one of the oldest living alumnae of Saint Mary's. In her 
younger days she was a very accomplished musician, and all her life 
was noted for her poise and for her grave and remarkable beauty. 
In her young ladyhood she was active in all church, social and com- 
munity service work. An ardent and uncompromising Confederate, 
she was untiring and unstinting in her labors and sacrifices for the 
Lost Cause. 

In 1863 she married General Bryan Grimes and spent the hard 
winters of 1863-4 and 1864-5 in the camps of the Army of Northern 
Virginia with her husband, ministering to the sufferings of the 
soldiers. 

After the war she lived at Grimesland Plantation. Upon the death 
of General Grimes in 1880, she consecrated her life to his memory 
and to the rearing of a large family of children. Mrs. Grimes had a 
strong mind, fine judgment, much strength of character and a quiet 
dignity that gave her a controlling influence over her children and 
upon those with whom she came in close contact. 

In her plantation life, she was characterized by a high feeling of 
responsibility for her dependents that held their love and reverence. 

For many years she was president of the Ladies' Memorial Asso- 
ciation of Beaufort County, and president and honorary president 
of the Pamlico Chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy of Wash- 
ington, ]ST. C. She was also an honorary president of the 1ST. C. Divi- 
sion of the U. D. C. 

She was buried in the family cemetery at Grimesland. 



38 Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 



Mrs. George H. Snow 

Elizabeth McCullouch Boylan, relict of George H. Snow, passed 
from this life into the higher one, at her home in Raleigh, on the 
19th day of August, 1921, in the. seventy-third year of her age. 

In the death of Mrs. Snow the community has lost a useful and 
well-beloved citizen, her connections and friends a very dear com- 
panion, and her children a most affectionate and considerate mother. 

Mrs. Snow was the oldest child of William M. Boylan and Mary 
Kinsey, his wife. Her grandfather, William Boylan, was one of the 
early and prominent settlers of Raleigh and a native of the State of 
New Jersey. She was born the 18th of October, 1848, on the plan- 
tation of her father, beyond Crabtree Creek, three miles north of 
Raleigh, the home of her father and mother at that time. In her 
early childhood, the Boylan family came to Raleigh to reside in the 
house which in later years was used as the rectory of the Church of 
the Good Shepherd. Afterwards the family moved to the handsome 
home built by Mr. Boylan, beyond the bridge on South Boylan Ave- 
nue, just before the breaking out of the War between the States. 
Mrs. Snow was the oldest of four children, Mary, afterwards Mrs. 
Joseph Haywood, and two brothers, James and William Boylan. 

Mrs. Snow was educated at Saint Mary's School, entering when 
very young, and while, not one of the "original thirteen," she was a 
student during the early life of the school. She was always devoted 
to the memory of Dr. Aldert Smedes, founder of Saint Mary's and a 
loyal friend and supporter of that school. Her interest and loyalty 
were recognized in her appointment by the General Alumnae as one 
of their council, and also as chairman of the Raleigh chapter. She 
filled both positions with faithfulness and ability. 

Mrs. Snow was from early youth a member of Christ Church, 
Raleigh, and a most regular attendant upon the services of that 
parish. 

Mrs. Snow, "Betsey," as she was affectionately called by her family 
and close friends, was one of the happiest-hearted persons I ever 
knew, always wearing a smile, and giving you a pleasant greeting 



Saint Maky's School- Bulletin 39 

wherever you met her. She had a happy, contagious laugh which, with 
other of her youthful characteristics, lasted till the close of her life. 
Her warm and generous heart, combined with so much sweetness of 
nature, made her many and lasting friends. She was so youthful in 
her feelings and pleasures that she was a companion to her children. 

Elizabeth McCullouch Boy Ian was married to George H. Snow, a 
young lawyer of Raleigh, North Carolina, on the 18th of January, 
1871, in Christ Church, Raleigh. Mr. Snow was a very handsome 
man, possessed of a fine personal appearance and of splendid mental 
gifts and accomplishments, and in social life was very popular. As 
young people they formed an attachment, which resulted in an early 
marriage. Soon afterwards, Mr. Snow became a lawyer of extensive 
practice at the) Raleigh bar. He was a good advocate in jury trials, 
and presented his cases with force and dignity in his arguments be- 
fore the Supreme Court. He died in New York while undergoing 
medical treatment, in 1893. 

The early years of the married life of Mr. and Mrs. Snow were 
spent in the home of her father on Boylan Avenue. Her father then 
built for her a residence, which she and her husband occupied as their 
home until their death and the marriages' of their children. 

There were four children of her marriage : William Boylan, George 
H., Mary, wife of Charles Baskerville, and Adelaide, Mrs. Boylston. 
Mrs. Boylston made her home with her mother for several years, and 
was her daily and devoted companion, brightening with her cheerful 
spirits and devoted attention, her mother's declining years. 

On the day following her attendance at church, late on the after- 
noon of the 19 th of August, her spirit was suddenly called to the 
Home of the Blessed. 



40 Saint Maky's School Bulletin 



NEWS OF THE CHAPTERS 

The Edenton Chapter 

By "Ruth Newbold" (Mrs. J. M. Vail) 

We are grieved to report the death of Elizabeth Leary Wood, which 
happened just recently. Elizabeth was much beloved by all, and will 
be sadly missed. She leaves one child, George Wood, Jr. 

"Nellie Rose" (Mrs. Joseph Conger), of Henderson, has a son. 

Marion Drane and Pencie Warren are teaching in the graded 
school here. 

"Emma Badham" (Mrs. Henry Gardner) was married in June. 
Mr. Gardner is connected with the Citizen's Bank here. Emma is 
teaching again this year. 

"Mary Conger" (Mrs. R. Elton Forehand) has a son. 

"Elizabeth Gaither" (Mrs. Edward Conger) has moved to Eliza- 
beth City to live. 

Eva Rogerson is very active in public welfare work. 

"Ruth Newbold" (Mrs. J. M. Vail) expects to serve as Dame of 
Honor at her brother's wedding, which is to take place during the 
holidays. 

"Annie Wood" (Mrs. W. B. Foreman) has a young son several 
months old. Annie is visiting at Hayes-Edenton at present. 

Katherine and Marion Drane expect to spend the holidays in 
New York. 

The Henderson Chapter 

By "Elizabeth Cokbitt" (Mrs. F. L. Toepleman) 

We have not a very active chapter and our new president is in 
mourning, so we have not had a fall meeting, but I will try to send 
you a few facts that might be of some interest to our old friends in 
other towns. We have about forty members, and with so many of our 
town girls at Saint Mary's this year, I feel that we shall probably 
have fifty by next year. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 41 

We enjoyed a lovely recital last spring by Miss Davis and Miss 
Southwick, and hope that we may have another next spring. 

"Mary Shuford" (Mrs. R. G. S. Davis), our president, has lost 
her mother recently. "Mary" has a new son. 

"Dolores Holt" was married to a Henderson man, William T. 
Cheatham, Jr., at Blowing Rock early in October. "Elizabeth Cor- 
bitt" (Mrs. F. L. Toepleman) with Elizabeth Corbitt, Jr., went to 
the wedding. We are happy to have "Dolly" in our midst. 

"Fannie Cooper" (Mrs. A. A. ZollicofTer) lost her father last 
spring. 

We had a nice delegation at the Alumnae luncheon last commence- 
ment, and they seemed to enjoy it so much. We are all so anxious to 
help build the new entrance to the "Grove." 

The Norfolk and Portsmouth Chapter 

Julia L. McMokeis 

The second meeting of the year of the Norfolk and Portsmouth 
Chapter of Saint Mary's Alumnae met on November the 1st, with 
Mrs. J. W. Old in Norfolk. After roll call, to which fifteen mem- 
bers responded, the minutes of the May meeting were read and ap- 
proved. Mrs. Morrisette, who was a delegate from this chapter, gave 
a very gratifying report of the annual meeting in Raleigh. The an- 
nual election of officers then took place. 

With the singing of some of the Saint Mary's songs, the meeting 
adjourned, after which the members enjoyed the charming hospitality 
of the hostess. 

The Raleigh Chapter 

By Mattie H. Bailey 

Very little has been done in the past year in the Raleigh Chapter 
of the Alumnae, but here it is briefly : 

In regard to personal news, I know of none, except a poem which 
was written in China by "Frances Cameron." It is reported that, 
because of this, she has been made Poet Laureate of China. 



42 Saint Maky's School Bulletin 

In May, 1921, a luncheon for the State Alumnae was given at the 
Woman's Club, and was engineered by the Raleigh Chapter. Mrs. 
Thomas Ashe, Mrs. J. J. Bernard and Mrs. Will Vass were the com- 
mittee, assisted by Miss Mary Hoke and Miss Mattie Bailey. At the 
luncheon Mrs. Brown ("Derryle Law") of Washington, D. C, told 
of the pageant to be given in Washington. Miss Emmie McVea, from 
Sweet Briar; Miss Katie McKimmon and Mrs. Brown were the 
speakers, also Mr. Cruikshank. There were delegates at the luncheon 
from the State chapters. The Saint Mary's girls did "stunts." 

There have been two meetings, one in the fall and one in the spring. 
The chief discussions have been concerning a gateway for Saint 
Mary's. At the last meeting the chairman, Mrs. R. B. Raney, sug- 
gested having an afternoon tea to bring together the girls and the 
faculty of Saint Mary's and the town people. This will be given 
soon, that we may know each other better. 

The Scotland Neck Chapter 

By Hebe Shields 

The Scotland Neck Chapter of the Saint Mary's Alumnae Associa- 
tion had its Founders' Day meeting on the Saturday following All 
Saints' Day at the home of Miss Rebe Shields. "The Meaning of 
Founders' Day," written by "Miss Katie," was read by Miss Laura 
Clark, and an article on "The Chapel," by one of our late members, 
Miss Addie E. Smith, was read by Mrs. C. H. Herring. Interesting 
talks were given by Mrs. J. H. Alexander, Mrs. C. H. Herring and 
Mrs. Isaac Smith on "When I Was at Saint Mary's." Miss Rebe 
Hill Shields, the president of the Alumnae Association, outlined the 
plans for the year, and our chapter promised its loyal support. The 
following officers were elected : Miss Rebe Hill Shields, president ; 
Miss Bertha Albertson, secretary and Muse secretary; Miss Laura 
Clark, treasurer. Tea and sandwiches were served by the hostess, 
assisted by Miss Susie Hill and Mrs. David Bryant. 

During the first part of January a meeting of the Scotland Neck 
Alumnae Chapter was called at the home of Miss Laura Clark. We 
decided that the Southwick-Spofford concert was to be a certainty, 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



and outlined plans to advertise and make the same a success from our 
end of the line. Much enthusiasm was manifested. The hostess served 
delightful refreshments. 

In February Misses Southwick and SpofTord gave Scotland Neck 
a very delightful musical treat. The concert was thoroughly enjoyed 
and appreciated. Afterwards, Miss Rebe Shields entertained some 
friends and members of the Alumnae Association at her home in 
honor of the artists. All enjoyed seeing and knowing them just as 
much as they did their lovely music. 

On April 12th the Alumnae in Scotland Neck met with Miss Rebe 
Shields. The officers were reelected to serve another year. Miss 
Ellen Speed entertained us with Saint Mary's songs, accompanied by 
Miss Janet White and Mrs. David Bryant. Mrs. Isaac Smith, who 
was at Saint Mary's during the Civil War told us many of her inter- 
esting experiences during those trying days. Miss Laura Clark was 
elected delegate to the Alumnae meeting and luncheon in Raleigh. 
After enjoying ice cream and cake, the meeting was adjourned. 

The Founders' Day meeting of 1921 was held at the home of the 
president. The crowd of "old Saint Mary's girls" sang several school 
songs, led by Miss Ellen Speed. Mrs. J. H. Alexander, Sr., gave us 
a charming synopsis and talk on the pageant which is to be given by 
the Washington, D. C, chapter next spring. The president urged all 
members to send news clippings to Miss Sarah Cheshire. A beautiful 
tribute to Miss Eleanor Smith, one of our loved members who has 
recently passed away, was read by Miss Lena Smith. After refresh- 
ments the meeting was adjourned. 

Bertha Albertson is our youngest graduate, and our secretary. 
"Bertie" is doing stenographic work in a law office and has recently 
been Louise Toler's maid of honor. 

"Mamie Shields" (Mrs. J. H. Alexander, Sr.) is back at her old 
home. She has lived in Chase City, Va., a number of years, but it 
is good to have her living in Scotland Neck again. The fact that 
"Miss Alex" is her daughter makes her of particular interest to Saint 
Mary's girls. 



44 Saint Maby's School Bulletin 

"Sallie Turner Smith" (Mrs. S. T. Barraud) lost her sister, Miss 
Eleanor Smith, who has been one of our most loyal members. In 
August of this year she passed away and her place cannot be filled. 
We extend to Mrs. Barraud our sympathy. 

"Nannie Shields" (Mrs. D. F. Bryant) is the happy mother of 
two beautiful little girls, Rebecca and Anne Dupree. a The Twins" 
are two years old, already talk of Saint Mary's and have a bank 
account begun to take them to Saint Mary's. 

Laura Clark was our delegate to the May luncheon in Raleigh. 
She is our secretary and one of our most enthusiastic members. 

"Betty Joyner" (Mrs. John Coughenour) lives in the country and 
cannot come to the meetings, but she always seems interested in Saint 
Mary's. 

Susie Hill has made her home in Scotland Neck for several years 
and is now taking a business course. 

"Sadie Bell McGwigan" (Mrs. F. D. Hall) has moved to Scotland 
Neck since her marriage. She has two dear little girls, Sara and 
Mary Louise. 

"Pauline Shields" (Mrs. C. H. Herring) has three boys, Charlie, 
Will and Robert. Charlie is fifteen and has made quite a name for 
himself debating. 

Jennie Dunn has been sick for over a year. She is in Asheville 
at the Von Ruck Sanitarium, and seems to be getting better all the 
time. 

Annie Kitchin's history is the most interesting right now, as she 
will be married in December to Mr. Ed Travis. 

"Lily Shields" (Mrs. Gideon Lamb) is one of our most interested 
and faithful members. 

Nannie Lamb is teaching and having a fine time at Nashville, 
N. C. 

Lena Smith spends most of her time doing church work. No 
one loves Saint Mary's more, and she never misses an opportunity 
of singing the praises of her Alma Mater. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 45 

"Sallie Baker" (Mrs. Sallie Smith.) was at Saint Mary's when 
the "Yankees" camped in the grove, and her experiences there during 
the war are always interesting. 

Nannie Smith lives in Raleigh, and is, of course, a member of 
the Raleigh Chapter, but we like to claim her, too. 

"Louise Josey" (Mrs. ~N. A. Riddick) has a lovely little girl named 
"Mary Louise," who is about two years old. It is nice to have the 
girls get married and not move away from home. 

Ellen Speed is doing some business work in Scotland Neck. She 
always makes our meetings a success by giving us some lovely music. 
Her voice means so much to the church choir and Sunday school. 

Mary Josey is with Mr. Cruikshank in Tennessee. We are 
proud to have among our number a receiver of the ISTiles Medal. 

"Rebe Smith" (Mrs. R. W. Shields) has most of our meetings at 
her house and she seems delighted to have us, in fact, delighted to 
do anything for Saint Mary's. 

Rebe Shields is recuperating from the strenuousness of being 
Alumnae president last year. 

Janet White is one of our most talented members, and is con- 
tinually using her music, her art, and her gift for designing. 



46 Saint Maby's School Bulletin 



MARRIAGES 

Carol Collier and Mr. William Borden Cobb. June 7, 1921. Home 
in Goldsboro, N. C. 

Emma Hudgins Badham and Mr. W. H. Gardner, June 7, 1921. 
Home in Edenton, N. C. 

Lucy London Anderson and Mr. Thomas Myers Wooten, June 9, 
1921. Home in Fayetteville, K C. 

Mary Ellen Travis and Mr. Troy McNeil Myatt, October 5, 1921. 
Home in Smithfield, N. C. 

Dolores Stevens Holt and Mr. William Thomas Cheatham, Octo- 
ber 5, 1921. Home in Henderson, 1ST. C. 

Carrie Louise Toler and Mr. Perrin Wingate Gower, October 5, 
1921. Home in Ealeigh, MT. C. 

Deborah Victoria Hitchcock and Mr. Charles Brandebury De- 
Camp, October 14, 1921. Home 19 West Sixteenth St., New York 
City. 

Caroline Brevard Moore and Mr. Charles Lewis Clark Thomas, 
October 20, 1921. Home in Charlotte, X. C. 

Suzanne Bynum and Mr. Julian Turner, October 20, 1921. Home 
in Fletcher, H". C. 

Pauline Miller and Rev. Arthur Huffman, October 24, 1921. Home 
in Raleigh, X. C. 

Vandelia Elizabeth Drew and Mr. William Oliver Smith, October 
26, 1921. Home in Raleigh, N. C. 

Louise Buice and Mr. Robert Edwin Dunn, October 26, 1921. 
Home in Raleigh, N. C. 

Sarah Littlejohn Rawlins and Mr. Thomas Harding Jewett, 
November 3, 1921. Home in Wilson, N. C. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 47 



Louise Yates and Mr. John Lewis Payne, November 5, 1921. 
Home in Charlotte, 1ST. C. 

Sarah Hilah Tarwater and Mr. W. Kepel Falkner, November 5, 
1921. Home in Warrenton, N. C. 

Mary Bonner Williamson and Dr. Graham Harden, November 9, 
1921. Home in Greensboro, 1ST. C. 

Mary Collet Wilson and Mr. Charles Edmund Kistler, November 
16, 1921. Home in Greensboro, N. C. 

Elise Poole to Mr. Ashley Home, June 11, 1921. Home in Clay- 
ton. N. C. 

Frances Geitner to Mr. Gordon Crowell, June 26, 1921. Home 
in Lincolnton, N. C. 



Mary Belle Small to Major Herbert C. Neblett, IT. S. A., June 11, 
1921. Home in Washington, N. C. 

Anita Farrar Smith to Lieutenant Neaury Leo Webster, Novem- 
ber 16, 1921. Home in Savannah, Georgia. 



48 Saint Maky's School, Bulletin 



SAINT MARY'S ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION 

Officers 1921-22 

Mrs. W. W. Robards President 

Miss Susan Iden Vice-President 

Miss Katie McKimmon Secretary 

Miss Louise Busbee Assistant Secretary 

Mrs. W. A. Withers ^Treasurer 



Directory of Organized Chapters of the Saint Mary's 
Alumnae Association 

Asheville, N. President, Mrs. Carrie Carr Mitchell 

Charlotte, N. C President, Mrs. E. A. Quintard 

Treasurer, Mrs. McLeod Patton 

Chapel Hill, N. C President, Mrs. J. S. Holmes 

Edenton, N. C President, Miss Pencte Warren 

Greenville, N. C President, Miss Novella Moye 

Hillsboro, N. C President, Miss Annie Cameron 

Henderson, N. C President, Mrs. Rob Davis 

Secretary, Mrs. F. L. Toepleman 
New York, N. T Secretary, Mrs. Paul Taylor 

Lawrence Park, Bronxville, N. Y. 

Norfolk, Va President, Mrs. Walter Whichard 

13 Pelham Place 

Secretary, Miss Julia McMorris 

Raleigh, N. C President, Mrs. W. A. Withers 

Secretary, Miss Mattie Bailey 

Rocky Mount, N. C President, Mrs. Perrin Gower 

Washington, N. C President, Mrs. S. C. Bragaw 

Scotland Neck, N. C President, Miss Rebe Hill Shields 

Wilson, N. C President, Mrs. Johnson King 

Elizabeth City, N. C President, Mrs. Walter Small 

Washington, D. C President, Mrs. Carey Brown 

3633 35th St. N. W. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 49 



DIRECTORY OF SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
STUDENT ACTIVITIES 1921-22 

The School Council 

Chairman Mr. Way 

Vice-Chairman Miss Morgan 

Secretary Mary Louise Everett 

Faculty Members 

Mr. Way Miss McKimmon 

Miss Morgan Miss Davis 

Miss Turner Miss Bottum 
Mr. Stone 

Student Members 

Mary Louise Everett, '22 Evelyn Way, '23 

Helen Budge, '22 Van Cleve Wilkin s, '23 

Josephine Forbes, '22 Elise Ballard, '24 

Louise Egleston, '22 Lucy Lay, '24 

Lucile Dempsey, '23 Lou Hairston, '25 

Senior Class 

President Mary Louise Everett 

Vice-President Frances Hoskins 

Secretary Hilda Turrentine 

Treasurer Mary Wiatt Yarborough 

Adviser Mr. Stone 

Junior Class 

President Lucile Dempsey 

Vice-President Marjory Willard 

Secretary and Treasurer Doris Swett 

Adviser Miss Sutton 

Sophomore Class 

President Elise Ballard 

Vice-President Lucy Lay 

Secretary and Treasurer Lorraine Smythe 

Adviser Miss Morgan 



50 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Freshman Class 

President Josephine Gould 

Vice-President Mary Powell 

Secretary and Treasurer Mary Hardin 

Adviser Mr. Way 

Preparatory Class 

President Mabel Hawkins 

Vice-President Amie Cheatham 

Secretary and Treasurer Emily Hadlow 

Adviser Miss Turner 

The Altar Guild 

President Susan Fitchett 

Secretary and Treasurer Mary Harding 

Adviser Miss McKimmon 

The Annual Muse Stan* 

Manager Helen Budge 

Editors Lenore Powell, Louise Egleston 

Seniors Juniors 

Josephine Forbes Daisy Cooper 

Muriel Dougherty Lucile Dempsey 

Julia Ashworth Elizabeth Hickerson 

The College Club 

President Frances Hoskins 

Vice-President Lucy Lay 

Secretary and Treasurer Claire Spence 

Faculty Adviser Miss Turner 

Permanent Program Committee 

Lucy Lay Doris Swett Susan Fitchett 

The Dramatic Club 

President Mary Louise Everett 

Treasurer Lorraine Smythe 

Director Miss Davis 






Saint Mary's School Bulletin 51 



Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society 

President Evelina Beckwith 

First Vice-President Lenore Powell 

Second Vice-President Josephine Forbes 

Secretary Sophie Egleston 

Treasurer Helen Webb 

Faculty Adviser Miss Cooke 

Sigma Lambda Literary Society 

President Josephine Rose 

First Vice-President Dorothy Nixon 

Second Vice-President Marjory Nixon 

Secretary Muriel Dougherty 

Treasurer Beatrice Parker 

Faculty Adviser Miss St. John 

Permanent Program Committee 

Lucy Lay Julia Ashworth Muriel Dougherty 

Mu Athletic Association 

President Julia Ashworth 

Manager of Basket-ball Van Cleve Wilkins 

Manager of Tennis Josephine Forbes 

Secretary and Treasurer Eva Lee Glass 

Cheer Leaders 

Mary Louise Collier Josephine Gould 

Sigma Athletic Association 

President Dorothy Nixon 

Manager of Basket-tall Mary Louise Everett 

Manager of Volley-ball Mary Powell 

Manager of Tennis Marjory Willard 

Secretary and Treasurer Marjory Nixon 

The Sketch Club 

President Josephine Rose 

Vice-President Van Cleve Wilkins 



52 Saint Maby's School Bulletin 

Secretary and Treasurer Sophie Egleston 

Critic Miss FEnneb 

The Granddaughters' Club 

President Marjory Willard 

Vice-President Addie Huske 

Secretary and Treasurer Dorothy Nixon 



Saint Maky's School Bulletin 53 



SAINT MARYS SCHOOL— SEVENTY-NINTH 

COMMENCEMENT 

Commencement Program 

Saturday, May 21, 

8:30 p.m. — Annual Recital of the Elocution Department in the Audi- 
torium. Barrie's "The Professor's Love Story." 
Sunday, May 22, 

11 :00 a.m. — Commencement Sermon in the Chapel by Rt. Rev. Frederick F. 
Reese, D.D., Bishop of Georgia. 
5 :00 p.m. — Alumnae Service in the Chapel. 
Monday, May 23, 

11 :00 a.m. — Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 
4:30 p.m. — Annual Alumnae Meeting in the Parlor. 
5 :30 p.m. — Annual Exhibit of the Art Department in the Studio. 
8 :30 p.m. — Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 
9 :30 p.m. — Rector's Reception in the Parlor. 
Tuesday, May 24, 

11 :00 a.m. — Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Annual Address by President Harry Woodburn Chase, of 

the University of North Carolina. 
Closing Exercises in the Chapel. 

Graduation Exercises 
In the Auditorium 

Piano Solo : Momenti Jiocoso Mosskowski 

Miss Edith Hutson 

Salutatory May Deaton 

Class Essay. 

Address President Harry Woodburn Chase 

Double Quartette : "Come Down, Laughing Streamlet" — 

Misses Hutson, Brown, Beckwith, Kirtland, Hawkins, 

Powell, Keller, Gould 

Valedictory Mabel Merritt 

Announcement of Honors. 

Presentation of Diplomas, Certificates and Distinctions. 

In the Chapel 

Processional Hymn, No. 396 : "Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand." 

Scripture Lesson. 

Benedictus. 

Creed. 



54 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Prayers. 

Hymn No. 311 : "Ancient of Days." 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Address to Graduates. 

Prayers and Benediction. 

Recessional Hymn : "Jerusalem, High Tower." 

The Graduates — The Class of 1931 

Elizabeth H. Careigan, Hendersonville. 
Eleanor Hope Cobb, Bay Head, Pla. 
Susan M. Collier, Goldsboro. 
May Deaton, Raleigh. 
Fielding L. Dotjthat, Danville, Va. 
Rebecca E. Hines, Clinton. 
Virginia L. Jordan, Crescent City, Fla. 
Florida F. Kent, Georgetown, S. C. 
Dorothy Kirtland, St. Augustine, Fla. 
Mabel E. Merritt, Raleigh. 
Caroline B. Mooke, Charlotte. 
Elizabeth Nelson, Florence, S. C. 
Elizabeth Nolan, Marietta, Ga. 
Susanne P. Pegttes, Greenville, S. C. 
Eleanor Tiplady, Roanoke, Va. 
Frances P. Venable, Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Katherine M. Waddell, Manchester. 

Certificates 

In Piano — Edith Hutson, St. Augustine, Fla. 
In Elocution — Fielding Douthat, Danville, Va. 

In Domestic Science — Helen Budge, Muriel Dougherty, Mary Josey, Caro- 
line Moore. 

In the Business Department 

Full Certificates — Dorothy Baum, Irene Brown, Mary Gilchrist, Mary Josey, 
Grace Koonce, Mary Langley, Katherine MacAllister, Alma Phelps, Mary 
Tucker, Emma Villepigue. 

Certificates in Stenography and Typewriting — Elizabeth Anthony, Elizabeth 
Cabell, Eunice Collier, Mary Hoke, Alice Hughes, Sara Philips, Josephine 
Skinner, Maude Spoon, Anna B. Thomas, Sarah Wright. 

Certificate in Bookkeeping and, Typewriting — Callie Mae Roberson. 
Certificates in Bookkeeping — Eleanor Chesson, Marie Whitaker. 
Certificate in Typewriting — Elizabeth Steam. 






Saint Mary's School Bulletin 55 



The Honor Roll 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members of the school, is 
the Honor Roll, announced at Commencement. The requirements are : 

(1) The student must have been in attendance the entire session and have 
been absent from no duty at any time during the session without the full 
consent of tbe Rector, and without lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course of study or its 
equivalent, and must have carried this work to successful completion, taking 
all required examinations and obtaining a mark for the year in each subject 
of at least 75 per cent. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good" (90 per cent), or 
better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" in Deportment, in Industry, 
and in Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing in the affairs 
of her school life during the year. 

The Honor Roll of 1920-21 

1. Mary Josephine Josey 95.3 

2. Dorothy Berrien Baum 94.0 

3. Edith Genevieve Hutson 93.0 

4. Christine May Deaton 92.9 

5. Mabel Elizabeth Merritt 92.7 

6. Florida Freeman Kent 92.2 

7. Emma Cantey Villepigue 92.2 

8. Evelyn Lee Way 91.6 

9. Mary Louise Langley 91.6 

10. Elizabeth Carrington Cabell 91.5 

11. Lou Jones Hairston 91.5 

12. Elizabeth Gordon Tucker 91.4 

13. Sara Lykes Keller 91.3 

14. Alice Swann Hughes 90.9 

15. Elizabeth Anthony 90.5 

16. Helen Amanda Delamar 90.2 

17. Marietta Cobb Gareissen 90.2 

18. Margaret Blow Elliott 90.1 

The Botany Prize 

The Botany Prize is awarded for the best collection of botanical specimens. 
Each specimen must have been collected and mounted by the contestant her- 
self, but help in identifying the specimen may be obtained. 



56 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



The award is made to the contestant who is adjudged to have on the whole 
the best collection after giving consideration to the number of specimens ; the 
number of families and genera represented ; the excellence of the mounting 
and preservation of the specimens, and the accuracy of the record. 

The judges have decided that the prize this year should be awarded to 
Miss Ernestine Thacker, of Raleigh, with honorable mention to Miss Dariel 
Woodeson, of Raleigh. 

The Niles Medal 

The Niles Medal for General Excellence was instituted by the Rev. Charles 
Martin Niles, D.D., in 1906. It is awarded to the student who has made the 
best record in scholarship and deportment during the session. The medal is 
awarded to the same student only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are : 

(1) The student must have taken throughout the year at least 15 points of 
regular work ; and have satisfactorily completed this work, passing all re- 
quired examinations. 

(2) She must have been "Excellent" in deportment. 

(3) She must have taken all regular general courses assigned and have 
done satisfactory work in them. 

(4) She must be a regular student of the College Department. 

In accordance with these conditions the 15th award of the Niles Medal is 
made to Miss Mary Josephine Josey, of Scotland Neck, and of the Sophomore 
Class, whose average for the year is 95.3. 



Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 



THE FACULTY AND OFFICERS, 1920-21 

Their addresses for purposes of correspondence, and the advisory positions 
they hold in student organisations 

Alexander, Miss Anne DuPree Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Bason, Miss Elizabeth L 404 Front St., Burlington, N. C. 

Bottum, Miss Frances R Care Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Brooks, Miss Catherine P Sewanee, Tenn. 

Cone, Miss Agnes Virginia 113 W. Mulberry St., Goldsboro, N. C. 

Cruikshank, Mr. Ernest Columbia Institute, Columbia, Tenn. 

Director of Muse Club and Muse; Adviser Class of 1924. 

Cummings, Miss Margaret S 3 Lewis Road, Winchester, Mass. 

Davis, Miss Florence C 414 E. Church St., Elmira, N. Y. 

Director Dramatic Club. 
Fenner, Miss Clara I Care Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Director Sketch Club. 

Fox, Miss Elsie A 1017 Washington St., Watertown, N. Y. 

Giddens, Miss Katie L 241 West 31 St., Norfolk, Va. 

Hesse, Miss Marion S 128 E. Water St., Muncy, Pa. 

Director Athletic Associations. 
Jones, Mr, William H Care Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Director Choir. 

Knox, Dr. Augustus W 208 Groveland Ave., Cameron Park, Raleigh, N. C. 

Knox, Mrs. Augustus W 208 Groveland Ave., Cameron Park, Raleigh, N. C. 

Lee, Miss Lizzie H Care Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Adviser Red Cross Auxiliary. 

Marriott, Mrs. W. McKim Box 73, Burkeville, Va. 

McKimmon, Miss Kate Care Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Director Church Service League ; Director Altar Guild. 

Perkins, Mrs. Charles E Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Roberts, Miss Ebie 103 Capital Apts., Raleigh, N. C. 

Searle, Miss Mary E {Summer address) Box 1065, Miami, Florida 

Fall address: Sweet Briar College, Sweet Briar, Va. 
Shearer, Miss Elizabeth E "Wingfold," Carlisle, Pa. 

Fall address: Gulf Park, Miss. 

Southwick, Miss Sue Kyle 120 Groveland Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

Spofford, Miss Marguerite 60 High St., Claremont, N. H. 

Director Chorus. 

St. John, Miss Grace E Hardwick, Vt. 

Stone, Miss Ophelia 1225 Gen. Pershing St., New Orleans, La. 

Summer address: Carpenter Library, Philosophy Hall, Columbia Uni- 
versity, N. Y. Adviser "Preps." 
Stone, Mr. William E 118 N. Boylan Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

Adviser Class of 1922. 



58 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Sutton, Miss Juliet B Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. 0. 

Adviser Class of 1923. 

Talbot, Miss Florence W 506 East Grace St., Richmond, Va. 

Way, Rev. Warren W Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

Adviser Class of 1921. 
Wilson, Miss Lotjlie M 434 Charlotte Ave., Rock Hill, S. C. 

Summer address: 24 Park Ave., Lawrence Park, Bronxville, N. Y. 
i 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 59 



THE SAINT MARY'S GIRLS OF 1920-21 

This is intended to be a student directory, giving the full name and correct 
address for correspondence of each girl. Apology is offered for any error. 

After each name is given the academic classification, in the "college" indi- 
cated by the Class Numeral. "Prep." indicates a member of the Preparatory 
Department, "Bus." a member of the Business Department, etc. 

The figure which follows the class indication gives the number of years the 
student has been at Saint Mary's. 

The names of the non-resident students are indicated by asterisks (*) ; 
those prefixed with a dagger (f ) were in attendance only a part of the session. 

*Acton, Alice Rudisil, Pi (1) 413 W. Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

*Adams, Margaret, '23 Bus. (3) 218 W. Morgan St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Ambler, Barbara Pow, Prep. (1) 412 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Ambler, Mary Gregg, '24 (2) Summerville, S. C. 

Andrews, Mary Burton, Prep. (1) 522 Green St., Greenville, N. C. 

Anthony, Elizabeth, '24 (1) Shelby, N. 0. 

*Ashe, Wyndham, Bus. (1) 16 N. Boylan, Raleigh, N. C. 

Ashworth, Julia Winston, '23 (2) Selma, N. C. 

Ausley, Mary Lyon Fawcett, Prep. (1) West End Ave., Statesville, N. C. 

Summer address: Blowing Rock, N. C. 

*Bailey, Clellie, Bus. (1) Neuse, N. C. 

*Ball, Alice 427 N. Blount St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Ballard, Myra Elise, '24 (2) Washington, N. C. 

Ballou, Betsy Wiggins, '23 (2) Oxford, N. C. 

* Barber, Harriet Atkinson, '23 (8) Christ Church Rectory, Raleigh, N. C. 

Barbour, Grace Elizabeth, '24 (2) Clayton, N. C. 

tBARTON, Edith Clare, '24 (1) Live Oak, Fla. 

*Batchelor, Anne Douglas, Bus. (1) "Inglesid-e," Raleigh, N. C. 

*Batchelor, Mary Shelton, Prep. (1) "Ingleside," Raleigh, N. C. 

Battle, Ethel Hall, '24 (2) 138 N. Church St., Rocky Mount, N. C. 

Baum, Dorothy Berrien, '23 (2) 231 Camden Ave., Salisbury, Md. 

Beckwith, Evelina Gilbert, '22 (2) 112 10th St., Lumberton, N. C. 

Best, Martha, '24 (3) Warsaw, N. C. 

Blakely, Madge Purstelle, '24 (2) Kingstree, S. C. 

*Bonner, Blanche, '24 (2) 11 Maiden Lane, Raleigh, N. C. 

f Bonner, Clarissa, (2) Aurora, N. C. 

Boyd, Lalla Rookh, '24 (1) Ayden, N. C. 

Boykin, Florence Harlee, '24 (1) "Wanah," Boykin, S. C. 

Boykin, Helen Mortimer, '24 (1) "Wanah," Boykin, S. C. 

*Boylston, Adelaide Snow, '24 (8) 30 S. Boylan Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

fBRATTON, Elizabeth, '24 (1) McConnellsville, S. C. 

fBRiTT, Verna, '24 (1) West Durham, N. C. 

Brown, Bessie Rose, '23 (2) Greenville, N. C. 

Brown, Irene Louise, '24 (1) Hillsboro, N. C. 

Brown, Margaret Elizabeth, '24 (2). ...117 Cumberland Ave., Asheville, N. C. 
fBROWNE, Gertrude Aileen, '24 (1) 1809 Chestnut St., Wilmington, N. C. 



60 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



IBrunson, Alice, Prep. (1) Woodlawn Ave., Athens, Ga. 

Budge, Helen Portee, '23 (4) 40 Fort Dallas Park, Miami, Florida 

Summer address: Wakefield, R. I. 

Buice, Louise, '23 (2) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Buegwyn, Emily Roper, Prep. (1) Jackson, N. C. 

Cabell, Elizabeth Carrington, Prep. (1) Waynesboro, Va. 

Care, Martina Van Riswick, Prep. (4)...."Bracebridge Hall," Tarboro, N. C. 

Caerigan, Elizabeth Hill, '21 (2) 504 Fifth Ave., Hendersonville, N. C. 

fCAVE, Caeeoll Moobe, '24 (2) 2002 E. Seventh St., Charlotte, N. C. 

fCHANDLEE, Virginia, Prep. (1) 2624 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 

Cheatham, Amie Jordan, Prep. (1) Henderson, N. C. 

Cheatham, Elizabeth, Prep. (1) 6210 Sellers St., Pittsburgh, Pa. 

Winter address: Pinehurst, N. C. 

Cheek, Elizabeth Waewick, '24 (1) 136 Belle St., Henderson, N. C. 

Chesson, Eleanoe Pendee, '23 (1) Plymouth, N. C. 

Cline, Helen Shepherd, '23 (1)... 412 Merriman Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Summer address: 455 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Cline, Florence Shepherd, '23 (1) 412 Merriman Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Summer address: 455 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Cobb, Eleanor Hope, '21 (1) Bay Head, Fla. 

fCoBB, Winifred Loftin, '24 (1) 1133 N. Elm St., Greensboro, N. C. 

Cobbs, Dorothy, '24 (1) Cloverdale, Montgomery, Ala. 

Collier, Eunice Bothwell, Bus. (4) 165 E. 17th St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Collier, Susan Moore, '21 (3) 206 N. James St., Goldsboro, N. C. 

Cooper, Daisy Strong, '24 (2) Oxford, N. C. 

Cox, Alice, '24 (1) Jonesboro, N. C. 

fCRUiKSHANK, Anna Lindor, '24 (1) Greenville, S. C. 

Darst, Marguerite Allen, Prep. (2) Monroe Hotel, Portsmouth, Va. 

Deans, Vivia Bevis, '24 (1) 312 East Nash St., Wilson, N. C. 

*Deaton, Christine May, '21 (2) 628 W. Jones St., Raleigh, N. C. 

*Delamar, Helen Amanda, '23 (1) 408 Elm St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Dempsey, Margaret Lucille, '23 (1) Goldsboro, N. C. 

*Donnahoe, Beulah Mildred, '24 (1) 131 Merriman Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Dougherty, Muriel, '22 (6) The Hadleigh, Washington, D. C. 

Summer address: Aloha Lodge, Evergreen, Colorado. 

Douthat, Fielding Lewis, '21 (2) Stonewall Apts., Danville, Va. 

*Drew, Alberta, Special (1) Live Oak, Fla. 

IDrew, Dorothy May, '23 (2) Live Oak, Fla. 

Drew, Marjorie Lula, Prep. (1) Live Oak, Fla. 

*Drew, Vandelia Elizabeth, Special (2) Live Oak, Fla. 

Dunlap, Hermione, Prep. (1) 116 Hampton Drive, Spartanburg, S. C. 

fDuNNOCK, Lois May, Prep. (2) 2307 Maryland Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

fEAGLES, Margaret Elizabeth, Prep. (2) Whitehead Ave., Wilson, N. C. 

t Eagles, Susan Rebecca, '23 (2) Whitehead Ave., Wilson, N. C. 

Eccles, Hope Douglas, Prep. (3). ...Helena Ave., R. F. D., No. 1, Norfolk, Va. 
tEDWABDs, Dicie Howell, Prep. (2) Speed, N. C. 

Egleston, Louise Aiken, '22 (2) 1 E. Home Ave., Hartsville, S. C. 

Egleston, Sophie Bonham, '24 (1) 1 E. Home, Ave., Hartsville, S. C. 

Elliott, Maegaeet Blow, '23 (2) 207 S. 3rd St., Wilmington, N. C. 

Everett, Mary Louise, '23 (3) Rockingham, N. C. 

f Faulkner, Katharine Margaret, Prep. (1) 

167 Pearson Drive, Asheville, N. C. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 61 



t Faulkner, Mildred, '24 (1) 167 Pearson Drive, Aslieville, N. C. 

Fitchett, Susan Virginia, '24 (1) Cape Charles, Va. 

Fitts, Loulie Holland, Prep. (2) N. Queen St., Kinston, N. C. 

* Flint, Elizabeth Ashe, '24 (2) 204 Park Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

Forbes, Josephine Lewis, '23 (2) 800 St. Patrick St., Tarboro, N. C. 

* Franklin, Mary Page, '23 (2) 701 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

*Frazier, Kitty Lee, '22 (1) 124 Salisbury St., Raleigh, N. C. 

*Freeman, Norma S., '24 (1) 401 Capital Apts, Raleigh, N. C. 

fGAiTHER, Louise Jocelyn, '24 (1) Hertford, N. C. 

Garreissen, Marietta Cobb, '22 (3) 306 N. William St., Goldsboro, N. C. 

Giddens, Sarah Louise, '23 (1) 207 N. George St., Goldsboro, N. C. 

Gilchrist, Mary Ellen, '23 (1) 423 S. McDonough St., Montgomery, Ala. 

fGiLMAN, Emaline deMontfort, '22 (1) Shelby, N. C. 

Glass, Eva Lee Fairbanks, '23 (2) 103 Jefferson St., Orlando, Fla. 

Summer address: Sewanee, Tenn. 

Gould, Josephine Faithful, Prep. (1) Cambridge, Maryland 

Graber, Dorothy Anne, '24 (1) Gretna, Va. 

Grantham, Elizabeth, '23 (1) 319 Hammond St., Rocky Mount, N. C. 

*Green, Sarah Frances, Prep. (4) 132 New Bern Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

Gregg, Louise, '23 (1) Florence, S. C. 

Gresham, Martha Caroline, '24 (2) "Warsaw, N. C. 

Hairston, Louise Jones, '24 (1) Reidsville, N. C. 

*Harden, Katharine Parmerle, Prep. (1) 1615 Hillsboro St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Harding, Mary Louise, '23 (1) Greenville, N. C. 

Harrison, Virginia Walton, '24 (2) Enfield, N. C. 

Hart, Emily Elizabeth, '23 (2) 200 St. James St., Tarboro, N. C. 

Hawkins, Mabel Robertson, Prep. (3) 1040 Oak St., Jacksonville, Fla. 

Heath, Ella Crawford, '24 (2) Winnsboro, S. C. 

Henkel, Lila Dunavant, Prep. (1) 229 W. Broad St., Statesville, N. C. 

Henkel, Sarah Virginia, Prep. (1) 229 W. Broad St., Statesville, N. C. 

Hester, Sarah Holland, Prep. (1) 186 Middle St., New Bern, N. C. 

Higgs, Mabel Helene, '24 (1) 1118 Dickerson Ave., Greenville, N. C. 

*Hill, Pattie G., '22 (2) 214 Polk St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Hines, Leone, '23 (2) Kinston, N. C. 

Hines, Rebecca Elizabeth, '21 (2) Clinton, N. C. 

*Hoke, Mary McBee, '20 Bus. (11) Raleigh, N. C. 

fHoLMES, Dorothy, '24 (1) Cordele, Ga. 

fHooKER, Lillian, Prep. (1) Greenville, N. C. 

Hopkins, Virginia Willis, Prep. (1) Tasley, Va. 

Hoskins, Frances Springler, '24 (1) 

620 Washington Ave., East Las Vegas, N. M. 

Hughes, Alice Swann, '23 (2) 218 Chestnut St., Henderson, N. C. 

Huske, Addle Currier, '23 (2) 673 Hale St., Fayetteville, N. C. 

Huske, Margaret Strange, '22 (2) Fayetteville, N. C. 

fHuTCHiNSON, Sue Hyrne, '24 (2) Lambs, S. C. 

Hutson, Edith Genevieve, '23 (3) 33 Water St., St. Augustine, Fla. 

James, Christine Isabelle, Prep. (3) Durham, N. C. 

Jessup, Sarah Fitzgerald, Prep. (1) 50 South 19th St., Richmond, Ind. 

Johnston, Nancy Neal, Prep. (1) Tanceyville, N. C. 

Johnston, Willie Russell, Prep. (1) Yanceyville, N. C. 

Jonas, Edith Melba, Prep. (1) Lenoir, N. C. 

Mones, Claudia, '23 (1) 1806 Hillsboro St., Raleigh, N. C. 



62 Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 



*Jones, Isabelle Hay, Prep. (6) 404 Hillsboro St., Raleigh, N. 0. 

Jordan, Anne Elizabeth, '24 (1) Cloverhurst Ave., Athens, Ga. 

Jordan, Freda Amelia, Prep. (1) 61 Charlotte St., Charleston, S. O. 

Jordan, Virginia Lanier, '21 (3) Crescent City, Fla. 

Josey, Mary Josephine, '24 (2) Scotland Neck, N. C. 

Joyner, Lillian Forbes, ■'23 (1) Greenville, N. C. 

Keller, Sara Lykes, '23 (1) 204 Eagle St., Tampa, Fla. 

Kent, Florida Freeman, '21 (3) 119 Winyah Rd., Georgetown, S. C. 

Kirby-Smith, Carolina Tilton, '24 (3) 

Apartado 703, care Casa Calpini, Mexico City, D. F. 

Kirtland, Anne Rommel, '24 (2) St. Augustine, Fla. 

Kirtland, Dorothy, '21 (4) St. Augustine, Fla. 

*Knott, Irene Grimsley, (1) 413 W. Hargett St., Raleigh, N. C. 

fKNOx, Annie Louise, '24 (1) Leland, N. C. 

IKnox, Gladys M., (1) Palo Alto Ave., Hollis, N. Y. 

Koonce, Grace Boswell, '24 (1) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Lamb, Matilda, '24 (2) 220 Burwell Ave., Henderson, N. C. 

Landis, Hamlin Mary, '23 (2) 127 N. Morehead, Charlotte, N. C. 

Langley, Mary Louise, '23 (1) Greenville, N. C. 

ILangston, Katherine Evelyn, Prep. (1) Speed, N. C. 

♦Lawrence, Elizabeth Lewis, '23 (4) 115 Park Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

Lee, Mary Phillips, Prep. (3) 325 Marshall St., Hampton, Va. 

♦Lenoir, Harriette A., '23 (2) Lenoir, N. C. 

Lewis, Ellen Gladys, '24 (2) Washington, N. C. 

Lewis, Katharine Anna, Prep. (1) 4200 Walnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Summer address: East Hampton, N. Y. 

Lewis, Mary Hester, '24 (1) Tarboro, N. C. 

tLiLLY, Hannah Pickett, Prep. (1) Fayetteville, N. C. 

Long, Hennie Estelle, '22 (2). ...Fourth and Catanche Sts., Greenville, N. C. 

Lupfer, Lucy Margaret, '24 (2) Kissimmee, Fla. 

MacAllister, Katharine Hollis, '24 (1) Bel Air, Md. 

-^Manning, Annie Louise, Prep. (3) 715 N. Blount St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Marks, Julia Andrews, '23 (1) 525 S. Perry St., Montgomery, Ala. 

McCoy, Mary, Prep. (1) Beaumont Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

MacDonald, Jean, Prep. (1) Imperial Hotel, Mount Holly, N. J. 

♦McDowell, Annie Ruth, Prep. (1) Elizabethtown, N. C. 

♦Merritt, Mabel Elizabeth, '21 (2) 502 Hillsboro St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Moore, Caroline Brevard, '21 (4) 206 Kingston Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

Moore, Maurine, '22 (2) ....No. 1, Magnolia Court, Greensboro, N. C. 

Moore, Rachel, '24 (1) Whitakers, N. C. 

Nelson, Anna Elizabeth, '21 (2) Florence, S. C. 

♦Nelson, Charlotte, Prep. (1) 16 Enterprise St., Raleigh, N. C. 

♦Nelson, Mary, Prep. (1) 16 Enterprise St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Newberry, Harriet, Prep. (2) Columbia, N. C. 

Nixon, Dorothy, '23 (2) Hertford, N. C. 

Summer address: Nag's Head, N. C. 

Nixon, Marjory, '23 (2) Hertford, N. C. 

Summer address: Nag's Head, N. C. 

Nolan, Elizabeth Mary, '21 (3) 408 Church St., Marietta, Ga. 

tNoRFLEET, Mabel, '23 (2) Tarboro, N. C. 

♦Norman, Annie Patterson, '23 (1) Halifax, N. C. 

*0'Donnell, Katharine, '24 (1) 714 W. Morgan St., Raleigh, N. C. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 63 



,*Oldham, Ruth, '24 (1) Raleigh, N. C. 

Owen, Annie Maupin, '23 (1) 31 Dinwiddie St., Portsmouth, Va. 

Parker, Beatrice Josephine, '23 (4) Elm City, N. C. 

Pegues, Susanne Payne, '21 (2) 726 E. Washington St., Greenville, S. C. 

fPERKiNS, Anna Edwards, '24 (1) Chestertown, Md. 

Phelps, Alma May, '24 (1) Mackeys, N. C. 

Phillips, Sara Hamilton, '24 (1) Raleigh, N. C. 

* Poole, Elsie, '24 (1) Clayton, N. C. 

Powell, Helen Elizabeth, Prep. (1)....1S8 Cumberland Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Powell, Lenore Christine, '22 (2) 188 Cumberland Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Powell, Mary Elizabeth, '24 (2) Southern Pines, N. C. 

Reinhart, Florence Virginia, Prep. (1) Sunset Manor, Ocean View, Va. 

IRichards, Kate Rutledge, Prep. (1) 212 Calhoun St., Charleston, S. C. 

Robbins, Roe Ella, Prep. (5) Raleigh, N. C. 

Roberson, Callie Mae, Prep. (3) Robersonville, N. C. 

Roberson, Helen Elizabeth, '23 (3) Robersonville, N. C. 

Roberts, Elizabeth Cowper, '24 (2) Gatesville, N. C. 

* Rogers, W. Ellen Mishew, Special (1) Raleigh, N. C. 

Rose, Josephine Mann, '23 (2) Henderson, N. C. 

*Russ, Julia Hogan, Bus. (3) 540 N. Blount St., Raleigh, N. C. 

*Sabiston, Mary Elizabeth, Prep. (2) Jacksonville, N. C. 

Sabiston, Sarah Mason, Prep. (2) Jacksonville, N. C. 

jSalley, Florence Evelyn, Prep. (1) 118 Rutledge Ave., Charleston, S. C. 

Hummer address: The Cedars, 7th Ave., Hendersonville, N. C. 

Scales, Anne Galloway, '24 (1) 

30 E. 42nd St., care Mr. Jos. Scales, New York City 

*Siler, Mary Bland, Prep. (2) 203 Forest Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

Simmons, Dorothy Lee, '23 (1) Goldsboro, N. C. 

Skinner, Josephine Blackwell, '23 (1) 430 Fifth St., Greenville, N. C. 

Smith, Laura Clark, '23 (1) Thompson Orphanage, Charlotte, N. C. 

Spence, Clare Ethel, '24 (4) Kipling, N. C. 

*Spoon, Maude Lee, Bus. (1) Ramseur, N. C. 

*Stallings, Nora Elizabeth, Special (1) Whitehead Ave., Wilson, N. C. 

Stanton, Lucile Claiborne, '24 (1) Wilson, N. C. 

*Staudt, Janie Helen, (1) 1201 Hillsboro St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Stearn, Mary Elizabeth, '24 (2) Belhaven, N. C. 

*Stephenson, Catherine Hill, '23 (1) 505 Tilden St., Raleigh, N. C. 

*Stockard, Eunice Loraine, Special (1) 10 Glenwood Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

*Storr, Lydia Virginia, '24 (2) 118 N. Salisbury St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Swett, Ruth Doris, '23 (4) Southern Pines, N. C. 

ITaber, Katherine, '23 (1) 600 S. Court St., Montgomery, Ala. 

Taft, Mary, Prep. (1) 10 King St., Charleston, S. C. 

Tatem, Helene Wynn, Prep. (1) Columbia, N. C. 

Taylor, Dorothy Kinsey, '24 (1) La Grange, N. C. 

♦Taylor, Sallie Polk, Bus. (1) Snow HilLN.C. 

*Thacker, Ernestine Lawrence, '23 (1) 314 Montford Ave., Raleigh, N. C. 

Thigpen, Virginia Gray, '24 (1) Tarboro, N. C. 

*Thomas, Anna Ball, Bus. (3) 601 N. Bloodworth, Raleigh, N. C. 

Thomas, Mary Elizabeth, '23 (3) 24 Elizabeth St., Charleston, S. C. 

Thompson, Minnette, '23 (2) Box 33, Jacksonville, N. C. 

Tiplady, Charlotte Mae, '22 (1) 383 Mountain Ave. S. W., Roanoke, Va. 

Tiplady, Sarah Eleanor, '21 (2) 383 Mountain Ave. S. W., Roanoke, Va. 



64 Saint Mart's School Bui/lethst 



f Travis, Maey Ellen, '23 (2) Weldon, N. 0. 

Tbexler, Eugenia, '23 (1) 204 Nichols St., Waycross, Ga. 

fTEipp, Esther Madeline, '24 (1) 701 W. Second St., Washington, N. 0. 

Tucker, Elizabeth Gordon, '23 (2) Plymouth, N. C. 

*Tucker, Mary Weston, (1) 701 N. Blount St., Raleigh, N. O. 

Turner, Jane Hodgson, '24 (2) Box 85, Henderson, N. C. 

Turrentine, Hilda Grace, '23 (2) 115 E. Caswell St., Kinston, N. G. 

Venable, Frances Preston, '21 (3) Chapel Hill, N. C. 

Villepigue, Emma Cantey, '24 ("2) 1517 Lyttleton St., Camden, S. C. 

Vose, Juliana, '23 (1) 425 E. Calhoun St., Macomb, Illinois 

Waddell, Katherine Mason, '21 (4) Manchester, N. C. 

Waddell, Mildred Moore, Prep. (1) Manchester, N. C. 

Waddell, Winifred Davis, Prep. (2) Manchester, N. C. 

Walker, Alice, Prep. (2) 315 Park Ave., Charlotte, N. O. 

* Walters, Macon, Prep. (4) 321 E. Lane St., Raleigh, N. O. 

fWASHBUBN, Mary E., '23 (1) 1548 E. 7th St., Charlotte, N. C. 

*Way, Evelyn Lee, '23 (3) Saint Mary's, Raleigh, N. C. 

*Webb, Frances Hoke, Prep. (2) 15 N. Dawson St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Webb, Helen Bond, '24 (2) Hillsboro, N. C. 

Wellons, Margaret A., Prep. (1) Smithfield, N. C. 

Weymouth, Virginia Orrison, Prep. (2) Box 456, Hampton, Va. 

Wheelwright, Sallee, '23 (1) 380 Highland Ave., S. W., Roanoke, Va. 

*Whltaker, Marie Fiquet, Prep. (4) 116 E. Park Drive, Raleigh, N. C. 

Wilkins, Anne Marjorle, '24 (1) 1610 Elizabeth Ave., Charlotte, N. C. 

Wilkins, Van Cleve, '23 (1) 387 Milledge Ave., Athens, Ga. 

Willard, Marjorie, '23 (2) Box 766, Wilmington, N. C. 

*Williams, Essie Zora, Prep. (1) Route 2, Garner, N. C. 

Wilson, Anna Boyd, Prep. (1) Beattyville, Kentucky 

Wilson, Virginia Herbert, Prep. (1) 619 Aiken Ave., Rock Hill, S. C. 

Wise, Eugene Marion, '24 (1) 9 W. Main St., Lincolnton, N. C. 

Withers, Avis Mary, '24 (1) 2949 Tilden St., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Wood, Dorcas Eleanor, '24 (2) Box 237, Canton, N. C. 

Wood, Ruth A., Prep. (2) Box 237, Canton, N. C. 

Wood, Margaret Raburne, '24 (1) Marion, S. C. 

*Woodeson, Dariell Beatrice, '22 (1) 606 W. Johnston St., Raleigh, N. C. 

Wright, Anne Louise, Prep. (1) 232 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, N. C. 

Wright, Sarah Susannah, '24 (1) Centreville, Md. 

Wynne, Nellie Jane, '24 (1) Williamston, N. C. 

Yarborough, Mary Wiatt, '22 (3) Louisburg, N. C. 

*Yarbrough, Mary E., '24 (1) College Court Apts., Raleigh, N. C. 

* Yates, Mary Elizabeth, Prep. (1) 2010 Hillsboro, Raleigh, N. C. 

t*YouNG, Helen McFarland, '23 (1) 120 Flint St., Asheville, N. C. 



Saint 21tarjj's 
School 

Suletrjh. Nnrttt (Earolina 



#*tritettts' Hmttbrr 
♦ April. 1922 



April, 1922 Series II, No. 2 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



STUDENTS* NUMBER 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
RALEIGH. NORTH CAROLINA 



Entered July 3, 1905. at Raleigh, N. C, as Second-dan Matter 
Under Act of Congress of July 16. 1894 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Blues (Poem) Louise Egleston 3 

Don't Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide (Story) Louise Hairston 4 

A Rebel Feather Bed (Story) Sarah Harrell 9 

Darky Love Song (Poem) Lucy Lay 11 

A Porch Scene (Sketch) Virginia Ward 11 

Round and About Saint Mary's : 

Who? Lalla Roohh Boyd 12 

Sketch Lucy Lay 12 

Verse Marjorie Page 12 

Rainy Mondays Lenore Powell 13 

Verse Ruth Doris Swett 13 

Sketch Louise Hairston 13 

'Twas Ever Thus Eugenia Trexler 14 

Editorials 15 

School Notes 17 

Alumnae News 32 

Alumnae Notes 40 



Saint lllary's School Bulletin 

Students' Number 
April, 1922 Series 11, No. 2 



Blues 

It seems to me a pity when a fellow's "down and out," 
When it seems there's nothing left on earth he can be glad about, 
When his life is not worth living and there's nothing left to do — 
That you ask him what's the matter and he tells you he is "Blue." 

Blue ! The color of the ocean ! Blue, the color of the skies ; 

And he takes this word of beauty and to thoughts of gloom applies. 

Blue ! The tint our God in Nature gave the everlasting hills ! 

(Yet in weak and common diction, what a task the Word fulfills!) 

Let us try to help that fellow, when we find him "on the bum," 
Just to say he isn't "feeling well," or "feels the weather some." 
Let's find a phrase that takes the place — just any other hue 
Might mean the same to everyone; but please don't let's say "Blue !" 

Louise Egleston. 



Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 



"Don't Let Your Conscience Be Your Guide" 

"Phew ! Won't somebody please fasten this bloomin' cape ? It's 
dangling all over me. Where is the end anyway!" 

A crowd of young men in various costumes lolled around the 
smoking-room of the Hill Top Country Club. 'Twas the eve of 
St. Valentine and the costumes of many countries, ages, and legends 
were represented in the vari-colored, motley clothes of nineteen- 
twenty-two men. Here, a courtier in gay plumes and satins con- 
versed with a Greek warrior, and over in the corner a dark visaged 
Mephistopheles smoked a friendly cigarette with a Pierot in a 
flashing costume. Here, a young prince had doffed his plumed hat 
and was twisting and turning in vain efforts to fasten to his shoulder 
the swinging end of his dull blue velvet cape. 

"Jack Cruger, if you don't come fix this blamed thing, I'll refuse 
forever to cut in on you to-night when you get beautifully stuck. 
Remember our promises to Kit, old man, and come help a poor fool 
in a crazy costume." 

A tall blonde-haired youth in a yama-yama suit strolled up and 
leisurely looked at him in his struggles. 

"Oh yes, your royal high Sir Dick. He is a most kind hearted 
young prince, who takes under his wing — or his cape — poor little 
country lassies, who come to visit his favorite damosel. Sir Dick, 
the indifferent, Sir Dick, the best catch in town, has at last fallen 
to the charms of a simple country cousin." 

"Hush your mouth, man, and pin up this invention of the devil. 
I wish I'd never heard of a country cousin, and it's most time for 
the dance to begin. I've got to go out and station myself at the 
door to nab the first green, gawky, timid-looking miss that comes 
in. That's a good fellow, Jack, old boy ; now it's straight once more. 
Thanks, old top." 

Jack watched him as he leaned over to pick up his gracefully 
plumed cap. Dick was good-looking and the girls were all smiles 
for him. But he was indifferent and his heart remained unaffected, 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



his head unturned by all their lavish treatment. Jack grinned to 
himself as he pictured Dick, the best dancer in town, leading the 
country cousin around the floor, while he watched gleefully from 
the stag line. It would be great ! 

Dick adjusted his mask as he stepped through the door of the 
smoking-room into the long ball-room. The floor was waxed to 
perfection and shone in the bright electric lights. The members 
of the orchestra over in the corner were tuning the instruments and 
in another corner a Roman Senator in a flowing white toga was 
fastening up a moon behind some conveniently placed pine trees. 
Dick bowed to the chaperons who were already lining up in the 
wall chairs. He stepped out to the wide hallway leading to the 
entrance, leaned comfortably against the wall and settled down to 
wait for Kit and her cousin to come. 

Why, oh why, had he got himelf into all this mess. Kit Mayfair 
was the cause of it all and he wished her in Halifax. They had 
been driving that noon, he, Kit, and Jack, and Kit had told of her 
cousin's arrival that night just in time for the dance. 

"Dick, I'm worried to death. You see I've never seen Nancy 
before and I don't know a bit what she is like. Mother said she 
was an awfully sweet little thing and very pretty. When I found 
she was coming, I wrote her about the dance and she is bringing a 

costume. She's lived in B all her life and it's awfully small, 

I think. And Dick, since you are stagging tonight, won't you take 
her for me ?" 

And he had promised — and a promise was a promise to him. 
Jack was wild with joy, and Dick could see himself dancing all the 
evening with Nancy. Nancy what ? Good Lord ! He didn't even 
know her name ! He was in a pickle. 

Cars were already arriving and dainty figures wrapped closely in 
evening capes ran up the steps to the entrance. Dick settled his 
mask more closely. Well, it had almost begun and he must make 
the best of it. He watched closely the figures flitting by him. He 
glanced at a tiny little curly-headed fairy in a sky-blue wrap as she 
danced by, bowed low to a stately queen with snowflakes still cling- 
ing to her hair, and remained faithfully at his post. 



Saint Maey's School Bulletin 



A limousine drew up at the entrance and Dick watched the foot- 
man open the door of the car. A passenger in a black peaked cap 
with pom-poms jumped lightly out. He recognized Kit, and the per- 
son inside would surely be Nancy. Dick watched eagerly. What 
would she be like ? Kit turned and was helping some one out of the 
car. Good Lord ! She must weigh two hundred pounds ! He 
turned and fled into the ball-room. 

"I can't, oh my Lord! I can't lug that thing around all night. 
My poor feet !" He looked ruefully down at his soft pumps that his 
mother had insisted a prince should wear. "They ought to be cast 
iron." 

A masked yama-yama came up with a vivid Pierrette clinging to 
his arm. 

"Your royal Sir Dick?" 

"Jack, I've seen her and she's huge — she's tremendous — she's 
awful. Man, I'm ruined." 

"The joke is on you, Prince," and Jack strolled unconcernedly off. 

Dick glared savagely after him, clenching his fist. A soft pres- 
sure on his arm made him turn quickly. 

"This is Dick, isn't it ? Dick, she's here, and will be out in just 
a minute. Of course it wouldn't be quite so much fun if I introduced 
you since you are both in costume, and she said she would rather 
come out alone. Bill is waiting, and you are an angel, Dick. I 
saw you here and told her. She will be out in a second." 

With a swish of black and white pantaloons she was gone and had 
left Dick to look longingly into the throng of care-free dancers on 
the glistening floor. Why didn't she come on and get the agony 
over with ? He turned to the entrance hall once more and started. 

Coming toward him down the hall was a girl — but oh what a girl ! 
She was in costume> — but what a costume ! A crown of red hearts 
encircled her proudly-carried, curly black head. Her short silver 
skirts were encrusted with hundreds of tiny red hearts and her 
slender, silver-clad feet were shod in slippers of vivid scarlet with 
large heart buckles. To her arm was tied a big red heart and in 
her hand she carried a huge fan of rich red ostrich. She came hesi- 
tatingly down the hall, and, as she came nearer, Dick drew a breath, 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



swept a low bow and gazed unbelievingly upon ber face. Her eyes, 
looking at him through the holes in her mask, were vividly blue and 
her small mouth smiled provokingly upon him. Gone from his head 
were thoughts of country cousins. What did he care about anybody's 
cousin when a girl like this was before him ? She was wonderful ! 

"Prince Charming, am I so very startling and may we not stand 
here just a moment before we dance?" 

"We mustn't waste many minutes, little Queen of Hearts. The 
music is wonderful tonight and I haven't a care in the world." 

They stood there a moment. Dick was beyond speech, he just 
looked. Her hair was so shiny and black, her cheek so smooth and 
rosy. Had a man ever seen such a girl ? She stood gazing out into 
the ball-room ; then she spoke softly : 

"Aren't the costumes just gorgeous, and — oh ! what was that ?" 

The lights were suddenly turned low and the music changed into 
a dreamy waltz. She turned swiftly. 

"Shall we dance now?" 

They glided out upon the smooth floor. Dick's head was in a 
whirl. She was so adorable and her voice so sweetly low. Kit would 
never speak to him again. He was a cad, a cur, but he couldn't 
resist her. What a marvelous dancer she was and how lucky he 
was to have seen her first ! He led her round and round the floor in 
the soft semi-d ^rkness. Wasn't life wonderful ! 

With a crash the orchestra broke into a- popular jazz and the 
lights flashed on again. They danced a few steps and Dick swore 
softly as a dark-browed pirate cut in. 

"Good-bye — for a few minutes." 

She was borne off, smiling roguishly at Dick over the pirate's 
shoulder. He turned away and went into the smoking-room for a 
quiet cigarette to try to collect his thoughts. As he crossed the 
floor he guiltily dodged a couple. It was Kit and she was talking 
excitedly to a huge fat girl in glaring green and white. They both 
looked at him and Dick's conscience hurt him terribly. But the 
Queen of Hearts was the most wonderful girl he had ever seen, and 
he had fallen hard. His cigarette smoked, he turned once more to 
the dancing, watching for his silver and scarlet partner. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



All the night long he cut in to dance a few steps with this mis- 
chievous little imp who had dared to make him break his 
promise. Once he managed to persuade her to go with him to the 
porch for a few moments. She was wrapped in a quilted cape of 
the same dazzling brightness as her costume and they leaned over 
the railing, looking out into the snow-covered lawn. She was 
radiantly happy and Dick watched her eagerly. He must make use 
of the few moments before some one came to take her away. 

"Won't you tell me your name ? How am I to see you again if I 
don't know ? Please, your highness !" 

Her curly head shook vigorously. "But you should know! I 
can't understand why you don't." 

"I should ? With whom did you come ? I don't see how I missed 
you ! Shall I know you when you unmask ?" 

She smiled mockingly and turned to the rail again. Dick was 
frantic and at this moment his friend and enemy, the yama-yama, 
came triumphantly to carry her away. 

"Where is your heavy-weight, Sir Dick?" 

Dick's conscience smote him once more, but he was now beyond 
any rescue. He rushed into the ball-room. It was just a few minutes 
until twelve and he looked frantically around for the heart girl — 
the girl of his heart. At last he found her and cut in just as the 
clock rang out the eleventh stroke. Everyone broke into chatter and 
masks were torn off. Dick, his mask in hand, watched his partner as 
she put up her hands. With a twist it was off, and he gazed triumph- 
antly into her wide eyes. 

"Oh Dick," some one rushed up to him and Kit and Jack were 
beside them. "Dick, you have been an angel ! Isn't she adorable ? 
I guess I might introduce you now. Nancy, this is Dick Richards. 
My cousin, ISTancy Bond. Dick, wasn't the dance wonderful ?" 

"But, but " stammered Dick. "Oh, my Lord, what a fool 

I am !" He turned to Kit. "Who came up with you, Kit ?" 

"Why, no one but Mother and ISTancy. Why, Dick ?" 

"Oh, nothing! — except that I'm just about the biggest nut in all 
the world and I am getting worse every minute. Come on, little 
country girl, let's dance." Louise Haieston. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



A Rebel Feather Bed 



Venerable and beautiful the old house stood back in the grove; 
its big white pillars like silent sentinels watching over the deserted 
yard. There was an air of sadness around the place. Small wonder 
since the three stalwart youths that had once brought life to the old 
home were off enduring the hardships of war in uniforms of Confed- 
erate gray. Even the master of the house was away tending the 
wounds of the soldiers who had fallen in battle. There was not a 
sign of life in the death-like surroundings until a young girl came 
out on to the porch, followed by a big negro woman of doubtful age. 
They were pulling out a big feather bed. 

"Let's put it right here, Mammy honey," said Mary Eliza. "L 
think the sun will get to it all right. Oh, it seems so nice to be pre- 
paring for Bob. I do hope he can get a chance to run over and see 
us. He said, if his company came near enough, Capt. Lamb would 
probably give him leave to come." 

"Bless yo' soul, honey baby chile, dat boy'll come if he hasta 
walk fifty miles fer to git here. He ain't seen dis ole place in a 
year and he knows us is mightly lonesome wid ev'rybody gone, even 
to Marse Mayo. Lawsy, I miss dem menfolks. Things ain't seem 
so lonesome an' sad-like since yo' angel ma lef us fer to jine de 
heavenly hosts." Mammy gave the bed a final punch and stood up 
to view her work. "Dar now, stay dar an' sun so you kin be nice 
; and sweet fer my young massa." 

"Mammy, Mammy," cried Mary Eliza. "Isn't that someone 
running up here now ? I believe it's Bob. It is, it is ! Bob, Bob 
darling!" she called as she raced towards the soldier who was making 
his way towards the house at a rapid pace. 

Bob caught her in a breath-taking embrace. "Sis, honey, I can't 
stop now. You must hide me at once. There's a Yankee gunboat 
that's come up the river and some of them saw me. They're after 
me. Quick ! You must hide me at once and hide me well. They'll 
search the house." Mary Eliza's mind was whirling as she tried to 



10 Saint Mart's School Bulletin 

imagine where she could put her brother. The old Mammy trembling 
with excitement stepped forward. 

"Come here, Marse Bob. I'll fix you, honey. Dem Yankers'll 
nebber think to look for you whar I'm gwine put you." 

A few minutes later three blue-clad men armed with rifles came 
up the grove and faced a frightened Mary Eliza and a belligerent 
Mammy. 

"What does you want here, you trash ? Whyn't you stay whar 
you b'long? We ain't got nothin' you want," were Mammy's open- 
ing words as she addressed the Federal soldiers. Mammy's hands 
were on her hips; this alone was a sign of her wrath, and in her 
eyes was a look that might send terror even to the hearts of the 
soldiers. 

"Madame," began one who wore the clothes of a lieutenant of the 
United States army, ignoring Mammy and addressing Mary Eliza, 
"we really hate to disturb you but there was a Rebel soldier seen 
coming this way and we are under orders to take prisoner all we see. 
We have every reason to think that this soldier came here and we 
must insist on searching the house if you won't surrender him." 

"Baby chile, don't you even answer dat white scum. You'll pizin' 
yo'self by talkin' to him." Mammy turned again to the Yankee. 
"We ain't got no soldier here. What you spose we want wid one 
anyway? Howsumever if you don't believe me jes go look yo' sorry 
ole heads off." 

The soldiers shot resentful glances at Mammy but refrained from 
speaking to her and started through the house. They made a 
thorough search from attic to ground, through the out-houses in the 
yard, all ; but besides Mammy and Mary Eliza, who remained on the 
porch, rigid as statues, they found not a soul. Finally they con- 
vinced themselves that there was no Confederate soldier there and 
left under the storm of Mammy's imprecations. When they were 
well out of sight Mammy gave a big sigh of relief. "Marse Bob, lamb, 
dey's done took dey hateful selfs away. You kin come out now." 

And from underneath the feather bed, which had been looking 
strangely big had the Federals only noticed it, there crawled out a 
gray-clad figure. Saeah Haeeell. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 11 



Darky Love Song 

Oh, I sings ma song all the lib-long day, 

For ma love, she lubs me true, 
And de chillun play round de cabin do', 

In de rain, de sun, and de dew. 

For what does I care for de wind and rain % 

And what does does I care f er de sun ? 

For I loves her so much it's almost pain, 

And I'll love till dis world am done. T T 

Lucy Lay. 

A Porch Scene 

The moon shone bright and blue upon the snow-covered earth. 
The clear, cold stillness was broken only by the crunching of an 
occasional pedestrian trudging over the newly-frozen crust. The 
wind whined shrilly through the trees and the night was bitter cold. 

On the veranda of a large house might be seen in the moonlight 
two figures, one attired in a beautiful coat of pure white fur, and 
the other in one of somber black. 

They were huddled very close to each other; one might easily 
judge from their lack of movement that they were dead. A cloud 
drifted over the moon, and when it had passed, it was noticeable that 
their position had changed. For a long time the two figures nestled 
close to each other. There was no doubt that a strong link of affec- 
tion existed between them. The white-coated one snuggled closer in 
the embrace of the one attired in black. One might soon begin to 
wonder how long before they would be frozen to death. 

Just at this moment the white-coated figure gave a low wailing 
moan. The door, before which they were huddled, opened, and a 
woman, very warmly clad, appeared. She perceived the two figures 
and threw up her hands in horror. 

"Mercy me," she cried, "who could have left the poor little kit- 
tens out on such a night!" Virginia Ward. 



12 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



ROUND AND ABOUT SAINT MARY'S 

"Who? 

I know a sweet old lady, but I won't tell who, 
Her hair is like the silver, her eyes are lovely blue, 
We meet her every morning, but I won't tell where, 
It may be in the flower garden by a rosebush there. 
Or it may be in the chapel in her own little pew : 
Such a quaint little person, but I won't tell who. 
How much we love this lady, I never can tell, 
For she is the oldest and the dearest Saint Mary's belle. 

Lalla Eookh Boyd. 

"Oh, but Miss Aleck, I'm awful sick. You just don't know." 
a How long have I had these pains ? Why, ever since last night. 

I just had to go to Latin; so I thought I'd come over right before 

lunch." 

"Eaten much ? Why, I haven't eaten anything to speak of. No'm." 
"Well, maybe I did — oh yes, I went to Myrtle's box, but I didn't 

eat anything much." 

"Yes, I ate some olives and turkey and a little mince-pie, and then 

my roommate had a 'sampler' and of course I had to eat some of 

that." 

"Please don't make me swallow that. Ugh, I hate 'em." 

"Oh, Miss Aleck, it's black — do I have to ?" 

"Well, here goes ! l^ow where may I go to bed ?" 

"I can't go to bed ? Oh — Miss Aleck I think you're mean. I'm 

going to die sure." Ltjcy Lay. 

Around the door crowd all the girls, 
With beaming cheeks and flying curls. 
A look of hope their faces wear, 
Impatient shouts pervade the air. 
Do you ask me what it's all about ? 
Just the mail being given out ! 

Mar j orie Page. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 13 



Rainy Mondays 

Rain, a Victrola, and — well, most anything else you like especially 
well! This is bliss personified. Sometimes the something else is a 
book — generally a book extremely romantic in setting, and quite 
replete with love, and things like that ; or it might be pen and paper, 
and in time, a letter to "him" ; or it might be just thoughts ! Sweet, 
gentle thoughts that lull you to rest and peace with all mankind. 
And every two minutes you jump up to put the "Sweetheart of Sigma 
Chi" on again. Oh, it's wonderful — rain, Monday, and a Victrola. 

Lenore Powell. 

Never where you want it, 

Always left behind; 
A frantic search ensues, 

Wasting lots of time. 

Bureau drawers ripped open, 

Pockets turned inside out, 
The whole room topsy-turvy, 

No sign of it about. 

In between two books 

A bit of cloth showed black, 
La Necessaire de Sainte Marie, 

Forsooth ! The Chapel Cap ! 

Ruth Doris Swett. 

"Oh, Daddy! Mother! I never was so glad to see anybody in all 
my life! Mother, if you just knew how homesick I've been, you'd 
never let me leave this house again. But you wouldn't have much 
trouble cause I've vowed solemnly never to leave again! Never! 
I'm going to stay right here at home with you and Daddy all during 
my vacation! You needn't look like that, Daddy — you just watch 
me — Oh ! there's the phone — I know it's for me ! 

Hello — yes ? Oh ! Mother, it's long distance ! Who can it be ? 
Hello, Jo ? Bless your old heart — how are — a dance ? Jo ! tomor- 



14 Saint Mart's School Bulletin 

row night? You just bet I'll be there! I just can't wait — Yes, I 
know Mother will let me come. Yes, I just got here 'bout two 
minutes ago — and Jo, I'm so excited! I'll come on the first after- 
noon train. Be sure to meet me — Good-bye dear! 

"Oh Mother, isn't that too exciting and wonderful — a big dance — 
my first night at home — I just can't wait." 

Louise Hairston. 

'Twas Ever Thus 

Dearest Mary: 

You know the last time I wrote you I was so tired of old books, 
and classes, and fish on Friday nights I thought I'd die. And I had 
firmly made up my mind that I was going to stay at home next 
year — Well, I've weakened ! 

It's the Spring in the air. Everything is so wonderful with 
the dogwood and violets all in bloom. The girls are all out on the 
campus in their bright-colored ginghams. Yells from the tennis 
courts clash with the music from the "vies." Everybody's knitting 
sweaters as busily as the squirrels that scamper around trying to 
make up for lost time. 

Everything is "Smiles" in the mail line, because — "In the Spring 
a young man's fancy " So, Mary, don't blame me for weaken- 
ing because, if you only knew, you would too. 

Lots of love, 
Anne. 

Eugenia Trexler. 



Saint IHary's School Bulletin 



A bulletin published quarterly in December, February, April and June, at 
Saint Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnse. 
Address all communications to 

THE SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN, 
Saint Maby's School, 
Correspondence Lorn friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

STUDENTS' NUMBER, 1922 

Editors 
Epsilon Alpha Pi Sigma Lambda 

Lenobe Powell Lucy Lay 

■Associate Editors 
Louise Hairston Elizabeth Lawrence 



EDITORIALS 

Since spring has corner — and spring has indeed come ! ~No one 
can deny it, with the squirrels running promiscuously around in 
the grove again, and the birds making merry so early in the morning, 
and the wonderfully warm smell of the outdoors — well, as we were 
saying, since spring has come, and we've all been home and had our 
"fling," there's nothing in the world left for us to do but buckle 
down to work. That has a distinctly unpleasant sound, hasn't it ? 
Because with this same spring comes a yearning just to loaf in the 
grove; to put on a light dress, and stroll around the dead-line or 
maybe read, or write a letter ; to play tennis or to make spring 
clothes. Anything but to work; what we'll have to do is to remem- 
ber that commencement is remarkably close at hand, and we wish 
to be ready for it when it comes. We wish to feel, when we hear 
the song, "Good-bye, school, we're through," that we have something, 
even if it be only a little honest endeavor, to be proud of ! L. P. 

School Spirit 

• School spirit, or rather what I truly mean, Saint Mary's spirit — 
what does it mean to you ? Are you sure your school spirit includes 
loyalty? If it does not, it cannot amount to much. But what we 



16 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

need is more school spirit and more evidence of it. It should not 
be something which we use once in a great while, and then put away. 
We know that every girl has it underneath easily forgotten bitter 
words, but what we want is an everyday school spirit. Can't you 
help ? Just look around and see. Boost ! don't pull back ! Go out 
for everything, — volley-ball, Field Day, Literary societies, dancing, 
and walking as well, and see if a combination of all our activities 
mixed with a liberal amount of pep, won't give us, each and every 
one, more School Spirit. L. L. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 17 



SCHOOL NOTES 

With the Rector 

Mr. Way hat lately taken several interesting trips that many will 
be glad to hear about. He attended in January the meeting of 
the Convocation of Charlotte in Reidsville, and of the Convocation 
of Raleigh at Rocky Mount, and spoke at each concerning Saint 
Mary's. In February he attended, at Memphis, Tennessee, the Sec- 
ond Annual Meeting of the American Association of Junior Colleges, 
taking an active part in the deliberations of this meeting by making 
several speeches. On his way to Memphis he stopped over at Atlanta 
and Decatur where he visited Agnes Scott College. 

From Memphis he went to Chicago, stopping at Mt. Vernon, 111., 
to see his mother. In Chicago, he attended the Annual Meeting ol 
the National Educational Association, Department of Superinten- 
dents, and also visited the University of Chicago. On his return 
trip he went to Cincinnati and Richmond, but in spite of all hia 
interesting visits, he told us, that Saint Mary's was the best place 
of all. L. F. L. 

Dramatic Club Gives Play- 
On Friday evening the Dramatic Club of Saint Mary's School, 
under the able direction of Miss Florence C. Davis, gave a delight- 
ful performance of Jean Webster's "Daddy Long-Legs." Miss 
Davis had shown her usual acumen in selecting the cast, with the 
result that each character was real and convincing. 

Miss Mary Louise Everett, as Judy Abbott, was equally true 
in her interpretation of the rebellious inmate of the John Grier 
Home, of the erstwhile orphan as a college girl, and of the young 
author in love with one of the aristocratic Pendletons. Miss Lenore 
Powell showed a sympathetic, if slightly feminine, understanding of 
Jarvis Pendleton. She appeared at her best in the last scene when 
she read aloud Judy's illuminating letter. Miss Martha Best was 



18 Saint Mary's School. Bulletin 

the artistocratic snob to her finger tips; Miss Daisy Cooper was 
equally happy as the confidential friend. Miss Lorraine Smythe as 
Sally McBride and Miss Marjorie Page as Julia Pendleton, were 
charmingly natural and true to the college girl type. Miss Marcia 
Wilcox as "Jimmie" McBride was even as lovable as the original had 
seemed to the reader of Miss Webster's novel, "Daddy Long-Legs." 
The characters of Mrs. Semple and Mrs. Lippett, parts peculiarly 
difficult for the young girl, were well done by Misses Helen Muse and 
Lucy Lay. The orphan children as interpreted by Misses Muriel 
Dougherty, Marjorie Wilkins, Mary Wiatt Yarborough, Susan 
Fitchett, Margaret Whitehead, Eunice Dixon, Elizabeth Moore, and 
Carolyn Tucker, were real children; their cringing servility to the 
trustees, contrasting pathetically with their spontaneity when they 
were alone with Judy. Miss Betsy Ballou as Abner Parsons, Miss 
Josephine Gould as Cyrus Wycoff, Miss Evelyn Tyson as John 
Codman, were most appropriately costumed; but not more so than 
Miss Martha T. Everett as Griggs, Miss Martina Carr as the butler, 
Miss Frances Hoskins as Carrie, and Miss Helen B. Chamberlain as 
the maid. Altogether, the play was a great success. Miss Davis is 
to be congratulated. 

Raleigh News and Observer, Dec. 18, 1921. 

"Merry Christmas, Santa!" 

"For you can never tell what the Senior Class will do!" That's 
what they said and this is what they did. 

On the last Saturday night before the Christmas holidays the 
audience in the auditorium chattered of "home" and wondered what 
was going to happen. Then a hush fell and the play began. 

It was a gay little play written by Louise Egleston, full of happi- 
ness and joy. The Seniors, entering into the Christmas spirit, sang 
and danced and forgot themselves in the rollicking swing of the 
music. Julia Winston Ashworth and Josephine Rose as "Bobby" 
and "Betty" quarreled so realistically over filling a stocking for 
Santa that they might have been room-mates in real life. The bright 
green costumes of Twinkle-Toes (Lenore Powell) and Silver-Bell 



Saint Maky's School Bulletin 19 

(Hilda Turrentine), the fairy lovers, were a Christmasy contrast 
to the red, tinsel-trimmed costumes of the other fairies. Frances 
Hoskins was, as Bobby observed, "such a nice fat Santa-man, just 
like the ones in picture books." Then there was Mrs. Santa (Mary 
Louise Eveiett) serenely kniting as she rocked, and Thumpkin 
(Muriel Dougherty) always up to some mischief. 

After the play there was a Christmas tree in the gym, lighted by 
shining candles. Beneath the tree were piled bags of candy and 
knocks for every girl in school. Santa Claus. who had followed the 
crowd from the auditorium, now reappeared with a bag full of knocks 
and a head full of funny sayings. Hardly had the laughter subsided 
when sweet voices were heard outside and the white-robed choir, the 
candles which they carried shining on their serious faces, came in 
singing Christmas carols. E. L. 

The First E. A. P. Model Meeting 

The E. A. P. Model Meeting took place in the parlor on the 
evening of Thursday, December 15th. The President, Evelina Beck- 
with, presided with her usual poise and dignity. The business was 
varied and excellently carried out by the members of the society, 
who never seemed to hesitate. The subject of the program was the 
well-known American poet, James Whitcomb Riley, — a choice of 
subject, most fortunate because of its familiarity. A well-written 
sketch of the poet's life was read by Lenore Powell, after which 
three of his poems were given by Lorraine Smythe, Mary Hardy, 
and Daisy Cooper. The program was brought most successfully 
to a close by Marjorie Page, who, in her inimitable manner, sang 
"The Goblins'll Git Yer, Ef Yer Don't Watch Out." L. L. ' 

The First Sigma Lambda Model Meeting 

On December 13th the Sigma Lambda Literary Society had 
their model meeting in the parlor. Since it was the first model 
meeting of the year there was much excitement. After the onlookers 
had assembled, the "model" members filed in impressively, and a 
moment later came the president and secretary. The meeting was 



20 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

called to order, and the minutes duly read and approved. The busi- 
ness, which consisted of a discussion about the limitation of members, 
proceeded easily and logically. Interesting current events were read 
by Minette Thompson. However, quite naturally, it was the program 
that entirely captivated the audience with its charming originality. 
Marjorie Wilkins read "The Christ-Child," a Christmas story writ- 
ten by Elizabeth Lawrence. The fact that it was both well-written 
and well-given, reflects double credit on the society. Then followed 
a solo, "Peace on Earth," well sung by Bessie Brown. Martha Best 
gave a quaint little negro poem, "Christmas is Coming" ; her black- 
ened face and pig-tails added a unique touch of variety. The last 
number was very effective. The lights were switched off, and a 
vested chorus, carrying lighted candles, came in softly, and without 
accompaniment sang Christmas carols. L. P. 

The Second E. A. P. Model Meeting 

The second Model Meeting of the Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary 
Society was held in the parlor on Wednesday evening, March 8th. 
The roll was called and the minutes read. Reports were given and 
the business carried on with unusual decorum. The program, which 
was of especial interest to North Carolinians, was on the foremost 
writers of North Carolina. Louise Egleston read a paper, giving a 
clear sketch of each of the writers chosen: O. Henry, John Henry 
Boner, and John Charles McNeil. Marjorie Page, accompanied by 
Helen Powell, sang "Back to Carolina ;" Eva McMullan recited one 
of McNeil's dialect poems. The last number on the program was 
"The North State," by John Henry Boner, given by Sophie Egleston. 
Then the president presented Sophie Egleston with a beautiful E. A. 
P. pin in recognition of her splendid services to the society last 
year and this. D. S. 

The Second Sigma Lambda Model Meeting 

On Eriday night, March 10th, the second Model Meeting of the 
Sigma Lambda Literary Society was held in the parlor. The busi- 
ness and reports were in the best parliamentary forms. The program 
for the evening was on "Folk Songs of the American Negro." An 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 21 

intensely interesting essay on the subject was read by Lucy Lay. 
Then a chorus illustrated the songs with two typical folk songs, 
"Steal Away to Jesus," and "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot." Sarah 
Harrell sang "Deep River," one of the old melodies transcribed by 
Burleigh. Martha Best read an essay by Elizabeth Lawrence en- 
titled the "Value of Folk Song as Artistic Musical Material," espe- 
cially emphasizing the songs of Foster, and Dvorak's "New World 
Symphony." The chorus illustrated this paper by singing "Old 
Black Joe," and "Massa, Dear." D. S. 

The judges' decision in connection with the above Model Meetings 
resulted in a standing of 15 points for each Literary Society. 

The Commencement Marshals 

The choosing of the Marshals aroused much interest this year. 
The results were as follows: Chief Marshal, Lucy Fitzhugh Lay, 
Sigma Lambda ; Margaret Lucile Dempsey and Marjorie Willard, 
Sigma Lambda ; and Helen Bond Webb and Sophie Bonham Egles- 
ton, Epsilon Alpha Pi. 

The Annual Inter-Society Debate 

The exact date for the annual debate between the two Literary 
Societies has not yet been determined, but we understand that it will 
probably take place about the end of April, or the first of May. The 
Epsilon Alpha Pi debaters are Louise Egleston and Lenore Powell, 
while the Sigma Lambda debaters are Lucy Kimball, and Adna Lee 
Bailey. 

The Sophomore-Senior Party 

The Sophomore party to the Seniors, February 18th, was a great 
event! Just the greatest event that Saint Mary's can boast of in a 
long, long time. For — list ye all — none other than the Yarborough 
orchestra provided music for the affair. Shall we ever get over it ? — 
or shall we ever forget the Sophomore class of '22 that made it pos- 
sible ? I know we never could forget because it was a real orchestra 
that made real music, and the outcome was the peppiest party that 



22 Saint Maky's School Bulletin 

we can remember at Saint Mary's. The grand march, directed by 
Addie Huske in a most becoming old-fashioned dress, and led by 
Lucy Lay and Mary Louise Everett, gave a good opportunity for the 
many attractive, bewitching and in some cases, puzzling costumes, 
to be exhibited. Lucy Lay and Mary Louise Everett, in colonial at- 
tire, were voted the best costumed, and Mary Louise, beautiful in a 
trailing pink dress and organdie flowers, received a little old-fash- 
ioned corsage. Lenore Powell, the Sheik, and Ruth Farr, Diana, 
were honorably mentioned. In the "best-dancers" contest, Martha 
Best and Mary Louise Everett won the first prize, and Ida Hinnant 
and Murial Dougherty, second. There were two no-break dances, 
balm to the hearts of crushes. Susan Fitchett and Annie Davenport 
were the lucky winners of the elimination dance, receiving a box of 
candy as a prize. This party of the Sophomores to the Seniors will 
live in the Seniors' hearts forever — for it brought the thrill that only 
a real orchestra at Saint Mary's could bring. 

Freshman-Junior Party- 
Come to the Freshman Fair, 
You'll meet all your classmates there. 

This is our hobby 

So come to the lobby, 
But don't bring a single care ! 

The lobby was decorated in the class colors, lavender and purple ; 
here and there were placed booths with gay streamers. Promptly 
at 8 :15 the Juniors, in response to this invitation, thronged up Main 
Building steps. They were greeted by the Freshmen and presented 
with purple caps and then the "Fair" began. Tenpins were knocked 
down for lollypops, pink lemonade served lavishly in one booth, 
while in another hot dogs and rolls helped to fill a vacant spot. The 
sideshows were very original and interesting, but the main feature 
of the evening was the visions called up by a Freshman through her 
medium. These visions, effectively staged in tableau form, strange 
to say, took the form of modern advertisements and were aided in 
their huge success by the Freshman String Orchestra. This orchestra 
later furnished music for dancing. But all good things must come to 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 23 

an end and at 9 :50 the light-flash brought the usual flurry of good 
nights and good byes, everybody declaring that the Fair was the best 
party ever. L. H. 

Stunt Night 

After a week of strenuous and frantic rehearsals on the part of 
all concerned, there was no reason to believe that stunt night, Feb- 
ruary 26, should not be a great success. The Seniors' stunt, as was 
perfectly right and proper, came first. The scene was laid at Saint 
Mary's, and the course of action took the spectator through many 
familiar experiences: there was, first, assembly, presided over by 
Miss Morgan — that is to say, Miss Budge. This, and the classes that 
followed, were highly amusing. Lenore Powell impersonated Mr. 
Way; Evelina Beckwith, Mr. Stone; Elsie Cheek, Miss Moorefield, 
and Louise Egleston, Miss Bottum. 

The Juniors gave a similar entertainment, but they took a different 
phase of school life — reporting after lunch. It was very amusing. 
Daisy Cooper gave another conception of Miss Morgan. Many 
(should you say fortunate?) people had the advantage of seeing 
themselves as others see them. Wonder how many of us realize how 
funny we really are ? 

The Sophomore stunt showed perhaps, more originality than any 
of the others. It was a clever idea, well-worked out. Martha Best 
announced in the beginning that there were to be three acts, namely, 
"What Some People Think We Are," "What Some People Would 
Like to Have Us," and "What (though she hated to mention it) We 
Really Are." From the highly improbable delightfulness of the first, 
to the extreme reality of the last, it was screamingly funny. 

Nothing could have been more comical than the mock wedding 
with which the Freshmen presented us ! In each and every detail it 
was ridiculous. We have only to recall to our minds Mary Powell 
as the bride and Whitehead as the groom to remind us of their un- 
forgettable stunt. 

The Preps showed their versatility again this year, with a rousing 
minstrel-show. They had everything that a really good minstrel ought 



24 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

to have — blackened faces (so black that the puzzled audience spent 
half its time trying to discover who was who), jokes, jigs, and 
songs — not to mention a handsome interlocutor — none other than 
Marcia Wilcox. The Preps had proof of their popularity — sufficient 
proof, because theirs was voted the best stunt. 

The proceeds from Stunt Night are to go to the relief of the starv- 
ing Russians and to the European Students' Fund. 

The Colonial Ball 

At 8 :15 on February 28th lovely Colonial dames and dignified 
gentlemen assembled in the parlor. Then the long line, filing into 
the gym was led by Anne Jordan and Betsy Ballou in a grand 
march. Miss Sutton played with her usual spirit and at the end 
of the march Marjorie Page furnished music for round dancing. 
During the evening a stately minuet was danced by Misses Page, 
Jordan, Turrentine, and Fisher, curtsying gracefully to their part- 
ners, Messrs. Trexler, Best, Everett, and Ballou. Delicious punch was 
served from each end of the gym by Elizabeth Lawrence, Katherine 
Raine, Lucile Dempsey, and Martha Best. At 9 :30 the strains of 
"Good Night Ladies" broke up the Ball and everyone went happily 
home after a very pleasant evening. L. H. 






Saint Mary's School Bulletin 25 



ATHLETIC NEWS 

The basketball season is over, leaving Mus and Sigmas alike 
up the air — for the score toward the banner is now 30-30. The 
Mus received 30 points for winning two out of three first-team games, 
and the Sigmas made their 30 points by carrying away the honors of 
the second and third teams. Could anything be more exciting? 

First-Team Game 

On the night of February 4 there was excitement everywhere 
because — well, we all know why of course. The first-team game 
was to be played, and it certainly came up to our greatest expecta- 
tions. There was excellent playing on both sides, and it was easy 
to see that everyone was fighting as hard as she possibly could. The 
Mus were lucky in having "Kitten" Burr owes as a new member, 
because she "did them proud" playing forward. The score was tied 
several times throughout the game, and consequently everyone was 
in suspense. The victory went to the Mus, with the score 18-16. 

Mus Line-up Sigmas 

F. Burrowes M. Blakely 

B. Brown E. Hadlow 

Forwards. 

M. Hardin M. Wilcox 

M. Wood M. Hawkins 

Centers. 

J. W. Ashworth ,. L. Smythe 

A. L. Bailey D. Nixon 

Guards. 

Second- Team Game 

The last game is always the most exciting of all, and the fact 
that no one who could help it missed the game on February 11, cer- 
tainly bears proof to this. The Sigmas have cause to be proud of 
their players. The final score shows this : 16-0 in favor of the Sigmas. 



26 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Mus Line-up Sigmas 

R. Farr I. Hinnant 

0. Holmes E. Hadlow 

Forwards. 
E. McMullan M. Powell 

1. Lowry L. Kittrell 

Centers 

V. C. Wilkins M. W. Yarborough 

D. Jones D. Cooper 

Guards. 

The Volley-Ball Games 

On Saturday night, March 11, the first volley-ball games were 
played in the gym. Though volley-ball is not so rough-and-tumble 
as basket-ball, it is, none the less, very exciting, because half the time 
you can't tell where the ball is going next. The second-team game 
came first, and the Mus, with a score of 30-26, were victorious. The 
Sigma first team distinguished itself, winning with a score of 44-37. 
The teams are as follows : 

First Team Second Team 

Mu Sigma Mu Sigma 

Hardin M. Powell Reinhart Willard 

Way M. Thompson Spence Hickerson 

McMullan Wilcox White Page 

Smith L. Powell McKenzle Yarborough 

Burrowes Smythe Collier Nixon 

Bailey Cooper Gale Kittrell 

Farr Hinnant Ambler Saunders 

Glass Blakely Gresham Josey 

L. P. 

The Church School Service League 

The various chapters of the Church School Service League have 
been unusually energetic this year in making their Lenten money. 
Ice cream and "hot-dog" sales have proved most popular, not to men- 
tion Eskimo pies and chocolate eclairs. 

St. Agnes Chapter gave "Ma Sweet and Her Gals" in the parlor 
on the afternoon of February 20th. Smythe, as Ma Sweet, con- 
ducted the affair in her usual charming style. Her "gals" were cer- 
tainly talented and the entertainment was a great success. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 27 

St. Margaret's Chapter had a cabaret in the gym. The program 
carried out the ever-popular contrast between the old and the new. 
There was the old-fashioned school-girl, with slate and sunbonnet 
(Elizabeth Lawrence) ; the new-fashioned school-girl, with chewing 
gum and movie classic (Madge Blakely) ; the stately minuet and the 
modern jazz, with its twists and twirls; the old-fashioned debutante, 
in her dainty lavender frock (Frances Hoskins), and the debutante 
of to-day, in her sleeveless evening dress of shining sequins (Martha 
Best). The contrast in mothers, grandmothers, and brides was all 
equally good. 

The Saint Mary's girl of the fall and winter was next pictured. She 
was dressed, first, in an airy organdie; next, in a heavy sweater, 
shuffling along in high shoes and rubbers. 

Punch, sandwiches, and candy were served by smartly dressed 
maids. 

St. Catherine's Chapter confiscated the "lost" articles left un- 
claimed in the pound, and held an auction in the study hall. In 
addition to these relics, there were countless freewill gifts from the 
girls in school. Lila Henkel made a wonderful auctioneer, and, with 
the help of Budge and Twin, the sale went off with a flourish. When 
it came to Mu and Sigma arm-bands, the bidding was reckless, and a 
whole week's allowance was squandered in one 15-cent piece of felt. 

E. L. 

Thursday Night Talks 

We have been fortunate during the past few weeks in having sev- 
eral most interesting Thursday night talks, and we wish to take this 
occasion for expressing our appreciation. 

Mr. John J. Blair, of the State Department of Education, recently 
gave us a most enlightening illustrated lecture in the auditorium on 
the art treasures in the Metropolitan Art Museum and the Corcoran 
Art Gallery in Washington. 

Miss Mabel Lee Cooper, who has visited here before, came to the 
school in February and spoke to us for a few minutes on the Christian 
Nurture Series. As we use part of this series here, we were glad to 
have the opportunity of hearing about the rest of it from Miss Cooper. 



28 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

On March 9 th, during "More Milk Week" in Raleigh, we had 
the pleasure of hearing Miss Maude Wallace, who is Mrs. Jane 
McKimmon's assistant. She talked charmingly and convincingly on 
the subject of milk, and as a result we hear that the school is having 
difficulty in supplying all that is asked for. 

L. L. 

Expression Recital 

Monday afternoon, February 27th, the pupils of Miss Davis gave a 
delightful expression recital in the auditorium. The first number on 
the program was a one-act play, "The Maker of Dreams." Marjorie 
Page made an engagingly optimistic little Pierrette, and Lorraine 
Smythe a very serious-minded young Pierot, forever seeking an ideal. 
The play ends happily with Pierot finding his ideal in Pierrette, 
thanks to the wise old Maker of Dreams, Evelyn Tyson. 

After the play the following selections were given : 

Happy Little Cripple Riley 

Runaway Boy Riley 

I Ain't A-going to Cry No More Riley 

ALICE ACTON 

Hollyhocks Edgar A. Guest 

Comfort Robert W. Service 

BETSY BALLOU 

Advice to Husbands 

HELEN BBYAN CHAMBEBLAIN 

One, Two, Three C. H. Bonner 

Ma and the Auto Edgar A. Guest 

The Land of Beginning Again 

MABGABET WHITEHEAD 

Homesick (Negro Monologue) Marjorie 1 B. Cook 

DAISY COOPEB 

The Silver Lining (One-Act Play) Constance Mackay 

MABTINA CABB 

An Old Sweetheart of Mine (piano accompaniment) Riley 

MABJOBIE PAGE 

M. Waddell. 
Musical Events 

During the month of February there were three very interesting 
recitals given informally in the different studios. Miss Weeks, Miss 
Fox, and Miss Abbott were responsible for these pleasant entertain- 
ments. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 29 

Saint Mary's girls have had the unusual opportunity of hearing 
three very exceptional concerts — Madame d'Alvarez, Frieda Hempel 
and Sousa's Band. These concerts were greatly enjoyed, even if they 
were heard from a dangerously lofty position. 

On February 28, 1922, a very delightful recital was given in the 
auditorium by the music pupils of Saint Mary's. The program was 
as follows : 

The Fairy's Story Mann Zucca 

JULIA WILKES 

Mazurka Matthews 

BETTY ROSE PHILLIPS 

Adieu to the Piano Beethoven 

MAEY K. BROWN 

Dance Caprice Grieg 

ISABELLA LOWKY 

Valse in B Flat Godard 

HELEN CHAMBERLAIN 

At the Old Trysting Place MacDowell 

Dawn Triuel 

LUCIE KATHERINE TUCKER 

Canzonetta Schutt 

EVELYN WAY 

Contralto Solo — Requiem i Homer 

SARAH HARRELL 

Bolevo Lack 

MARGARET WOOD 

Impromptu 1 Fame 

VIRGINIA THIGPEN 

Pompadour Fan , Cadman 

ELIZABETH RAGLAND 

The 4th Mazurka Godard 

ANNIE LOUISE THOMPSON 

Miss Katie's Birthday 

Miss Katie was honored on January 14th with a charming birth- 
day surprise party. On every table in the dining-room was a pretty 
candle-studded birthday cake, and on the rector's table was an extra- 
large one, with more candles than the rest, because Miss Katie was 
the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Way that evening. After grace had been 
said, and the candles were all lighted, Mrs. Way told us we were 
going to do what we were all wanting to do — wish Miss Katie the 
nicest wish we could possibly think of. So every one was silent for a 
second or two, to make a wish, and when Mr. Way signaled, the can- 



30 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

dies were blown out, all at the same time. Mr. Way and Dr. Knox 
closed the happy meal very appropriately with their short talks, prais- 
ing the long years of service that the oldest and dearest Saint Mary's 
girl has given her school. 

The Honor-Roll Dinner 

A delightful surprise on February 1st was the dinner given by 
Miss Morgan to the honor-roll girls. A long table in the center of the 
room seated the honored and envied ones, with Miss Morgan at one 
end and Miss Turner at the other. A vase of red and white carna- 
tions in the center lent a festive air to the occasion. After grace had 
been said, every one was startled by Babe Collier, who bobbed up 
from Miss Talbot's table and yelled, "Who did the good work?" 
Picture the added astonishment when one girl from each table in the 
dining-room chimed in with the response, "The Honor Roll !" Babe : 
"Who gets the good eats?" Response: "The Honor Roll!" Then 
came fifteen "rahs" for the Honor Roll, Miss Morgan and Miss 
Turner. The fun had begun. Each member of the favored few was 
given a hearty yell, and the uproar lasted throughout the meal. One 
unkind table took it upon itself to contribute "Smythe, speech !" but 
Smythe, with calm imperturbability, rose from her exalted station 
to say, "I am glad I made it." That was simple and direct, wasn't 
it ? And it shows that Smythe is not to be phased. The glorious 
finale — ice cream, cake and almonds — caused not a few sighs through- 
out the dining-room, but nothing but "wreathed smiles" from the 
chosen few who partook. L. P. 

A Midnight Feast 

On the night of February 22d, after listening to Frieda Hempel's 
lovely voice, we piled gayly off the street-car, and, instead of going 
to bed, like good little girls, we went — guess where — to a Midnight 
Feast at the Rectory ! — at the unheard-of hour of ten-forty-five. Mrs. 
Way and Evelyn met us at the door and led us into rooms cozy with 
firelight. There Evelyn's birthday cake, with eighteen lighted can- 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 31 

dies, was placed on a table. We all blew hard at the candles, while 
we made our best wishes for the birthday girl's happiness. Then, 
while we all gathered around the warm fire, Mrs. Way brought in 
saucers of ice cream, with nuts and crushed pineapple, little dainty 
lady-fingers tied with red ribbon and cherries, and cream mints. As 
twelve o'clock drew near, we decided that it was time for the feast 
to end, and we left, with hearty wishes for many happy returns of 
Evelyn's birthday. L. H. 

Principal Is Selected For Saint Mary's College, Dallas, Texas 

The following clipping from the Dallas Morning News is of inter- 
est to those Saint Mary's girls who knew Miss Jones as teacher and 
lady principal in 1918-19: 

Miss Alice Edwards Jones, of Chapel Hill, N. C, has been elected by the 
Board of Trustees as the principal for Saint Mary's College. Miss Jones re- 
ceived both her B.A. and M.A. degrees at the University of North Carolina, 
has worked for a doctorate at Columbia University, and has studied for a 
year at the American Academy in Rome. She was at one time lady principal 
of Saint Mary's School in Raleigh, N. C, and for eight years was head of 
the Department of Latin at Winthrop College, South Carolina. She has also 
been in charge of the Catlin School, of Portland, Oregon. 

Miss Jones is to be congratulated upon attaining such a high and 
important position. 



32 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

ALUMNAE NEWS 

Unique Honor Is Bestowed on Miss Emilie McVea 

The following clipping will be of interest to Alumnae of Saint 
Mary's : 

Richmond, March 8. — Dr. Emilie Watts McVea, president of Sweet Briar 
College, has the distinction of being the first woman member ever appointed 
to the Board of Visitors of the University of Virginia, her nomination going to 
the Senate from Governor Trinkle to-day. 

Miss McVea said last evening, when communicated with by telephone, that 
the announcement came as a great surprise to her, as she had not an inkling 
of the appointment. She said she realized it is one of the highest honors that 
could be bestowed, and expressed deep appreciation. 

It will not be her first connection with a coeducational institution, as she 
served in the faculty at the University of Tennessee, and at the University of 
Cincinnati as Dean of Women. 

Miss McVea said : "I have always been interested, not only in education, 
but in education in the South," adding that she is always at the call of the 
State of Virginia for any service. 

]STo further word is necessary, for many remember her as pupil, 
senior member of the faculty, and finally as lady principal, until she 
went to the University of Tennessee. 

A Saint Mary's Poet 

We are proud to be able to claim Miss Anne Moore as an alumna. 
She has lately published a volume of poems, which has won favorable 
criticism in the New York Times' Book Review of February 5th. 
Miss Moore, although she has lived in New York City for some years, 
is a North Carolinian, the daughter of Mrs. Roger Moore, of Wil- 
mington. In the Book Review, Hildegarde Hawthorne writes : 

She is a true artist, delighting in the labor of art, that passionate seeking 
for the right form which makes the artist's work at once a joy and a travail. 
Her book of poems, "Children of God and Winged Things," is written in free 
verse ; but in studying it, one feels that this is not because the author could 
not write in the most precise forms of the elder form, but because what she 
has to say finds its fittest expression in the form she has finally chosen. 



Saint Maky's School Bulletin 33 



One page after another holds its picture, each with hint of drama reduced 
to the simplest terms. And through all runs a compelling sense of beauty, 
which these lines from the latter half of Miss Moore's book, given to stanzas 
of a more subjective quality than those preceding, express with a lovely sin- 
cerity : 

"Perhaps I may see again 
Larkspur, flame-colored hills, 
The tracery of bare branches, 
Shadblow or apple trees in bud. 

Or, seeing, 

May feel only cold, 

Or heat, or biting wind. 

So I pray, 

Spare me, O Lord, the full measure of each year 

That may be mine of vivid feeling, 

But take me quickly, God, 

When beauty no longer moves me." 

The little book is one that should find its way into the hands of those who 
care for sincere and carefully wrought work — work inspired by a true flame 
of devotion. 

"The Cross Triumphant" — A Pageant of Church History 

On May 5th, 1922, will be presented in the Cathedral Close, 
Washington, D. C, "The Cross Triumphant," a pageant of church 
i history written by Miss Marietta Minnegerode Andrews. The 
| pageant will be given under the auspices of the National Cathedral 
' School for Girls for the benefit of Saint Mary's School, Raleigh, and 
I will be in charge of Miss Marie Moore Forrest, Director ; Com- 
mander C. T. Jewell, U. S. N., and Mrs. Albert JST. Baggs, Assistants 
to the Director ; Miss Bess Davis Schreiner, Organizer, and Mrs. 
a Carey H. Brown, Secretary-Treasurer, Pageant Association. The 
i sponsors are : The Right Reverend Thomas F. Gailor, D.D., Right 
■Reverend Alfred Harding, D.D., Right Reverend Charles Henry 
. Brent, D.D., Right Reverend Joseph Blount Cheshire, D. D. The 
i executive committee are : Mrs. James Carroll Frazer, chairman ; 
I Mrs. Burton L. French, vice-chairman ; General Pershing, U. S. A., 
fMary Roberts Rinehart, Hon. George Wharton Pepper, Mrs. Larz 
Anderson, Canon Walden Myer, Mrs. Charles C. Glover, Rev. James 
E. Freeman, D.D., Mrs. Henry Russell Talbot, Maj. Gen. John A. 
Lejeune, U. S. M. C, Mrs. William Cannon Rivers. 



34 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Scotland Neck, N. C. 

I believe the three most interesting things that a person can do is 
to announce an engagement, get married, or depart this life. Since 
our last Alumnse letter, not one single member of the Scotland Keck 
Chapter has done a single one of these three interesting things. I 
thought that Nannie Lamb, Laura Clark, Bertha Albertson, or Ellen 
Speed would have had enough consideration for the Alumnae News 
Letter to have, at least, committed the first of the three crimes, but 
they haven't. Just the minute any one of them does such a thing, 
it shall be announced to the Alumnae editor immediately. 

Nannie Lamb is teaching in Nashville, and likes both her work 
and the town immensely. She spent the past week-end in Scotland 
Neck, and all her new spring "togging" was very becoming. 

Laura, Bertha, Ellen, and Hebe Shields are still pecking away on 
typewriters. Ellen does not have a "regular job" right now, but her 
work is much in demand, especially when Bertha is snow-bound at 
her home in the country. 

Much sympathy is felt for Mrs. J. H. Durham, "Nan Smith," 
whose husband passed away on Thanksgiving. She is living with 
her sister, Mrs. Kebe Shields, "Hebe Smith." 

Mrs. J. H. Alexander, "Mamie Shields," has been ill for some 
time, having had some very serious ear trouble. As she is better, it 
is hoped that her hearing can be restored. 

"Miss Alex" and Elizabeth Josey are expected home from Saint 
Mary's today for the Spring vacation. 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Simpson, "Ebie Roberts and her husband," 
spent a week-end recently with Rebe Shields. In her previous visits 
to Scotland Neck Ebie made the whole town fall in love with her; 
so the welcoming of her and her husband was a very happy one 
indeed. 

The Scotland Neck Alumnse felt very proud of the Saint Mary's 
girls the evening the Carolina Playmakers gave their charming enter- 
tainment. Katherine Batts, Mary Yellott, and Ellen Lay were per- 
fectly fine in their parts, and we are sure that even Miss Davis would 
have been delighted with their work. Elizabeth Lay's stage manage- 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 35 

merit and "Trista" made us doubly proud. The girls motored to 
Tarboro immediately after the play, but we held them long enough 
for a little chat and for congratulations. 

Mary Louise Riddick, "Louise Josey's" little girl, and Rebecca 
and Anne Dupree Bryant, "Nannie Shields' " twins, are growing 
fast, and are beginning to know that there is such a place as Saint 
Mary's, where they are going when they are "big girls." 

We are looking forward to our April 12th meeting, and expect it 
to be a well-attended, interesting gathering. 

Founder's Day Meeting of Charlotte Chapter of Saint Mary's Alumnae 

In the Parish House of St. Peter's Church on the evening of No- 
vember 21st, 23 of the Charlotte alumnae enjoyed having supper 
together. Caroline Jones Quintard read to us a poem by Nell Battle 
Lewis on the subject of the Hallowe'en Dance which has become a 
tradition at the school. A sketch of the life of Dr. Aldert Smedes was 
read by Mildred Jones. A notice was read to the effect that the 
Saint Mary's Pageant which was to be given in Washington would 
be postponed till spring. A paper was read by Josephine Osborne 
on Saint Mary's Notables. Mrs. Frank Wilkes told of having seen 
Bishop Bratton while in Washington, and all were interested to hear 
j of him. Mrs. L. B. Newell made an appeal for greater loyalty to 
• Saint Mary's. 

Election of officers followed, Carolina McKiver Wilkes taking the 

i chair left vacant by the resignation of Mrs. Quintard. The vice- 

I presidency was passed over to Josephine Osborne, who is also to be 

! Muse Secretary, whereas Mildred Jones is to be the secretary proper, 

and Mrs. Newell is the new treasurer. 

J. A. Osborne, Vice-President and Muse Secretary. 

Address Before the Founders' Day Meeting of Charlotte Chapter of 
Saint Mary's Alumnae 

When the Master said "Go ye into all the world and preach the 
gospel to every creature," He did not expect men to do this of their 



36 Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 

own powers, but He gave gifts unto men, — to some healing, to some 
prophecy, to some preaching and teaching. 

To be a true teacher appeals to me as the consummation of all art, 
that moulding and shaping of human hearts to pass through the fires 
of this world and to travel on through eternity. It was the inspir- 
ation of Christ himself that motivated the founder of Saint Mary's so 
that he caught the fluttering souls of the children of the Church just 
as they were poised for flight, and directed their course with sweet 
and solemn purpose. 

Dr. Aldert Smedes was born in New York City in 1810, on April 
20th. He was educated there at Columbia University. Later he 
studied law in the same city, and at last studied for the ministry in 
the same place. One day, while walking along the street, he met by 
chance with Bishop Ives, who was searching for a clergyman to open 
a church school in Raleigh for girls. Dr. Smedes offered himself, 
and in two weeks he was in Raleigh, and the work was taking shape. 
That was in 1842, and he Avas then 32 years old. So you see we are 
now 79 years old. 

And has the ambition of the founder been fulfilled, do you think? 
It is said that in 1889 Bishop Garrett, of Texas, wrote to Dr. Bennett 
Smedes asking to be informed of the Saint Mary's way of teaching 
Saint Mary's women, "For," said he, "I find all over the Diocese the 
beginning of churches and Sunday schools, the work of Saint Mary's 
women, and I am determined to establish a Church school too, as the 
best means of building up my diocese." 

I glanced ,over the faculty of St. Peter's Sunday School last year, 
and I saw Norma VanLandingham Binder, Mrs. Wm. Graham, 
Carolina McKiver Wilkes, Esther Springs, Adelaide Smith, Leonore 
Seay, and others — nearly half the busy workers had been trained at 
Saint Mary's. And I have no doubt that this is also true in the other 
congregations of the city. As to foreign parts, it is easy to mention 
Susan Smith, and the Cheshire girls. 

In the world of letters, we immediately find crossing our minds 
the names of Margaret Busbee Shipp and Frances Hodgson Burnett. 
May Jones, of Asheville, is head of a big insurance office in New 
Orleans. And how the nurses and canteen workers did shine in the 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 37 

late war across the water ! In camps and community centers, Reba 
Bridgers, Esther Means, Harper Stuart, Mrs. Bickett, Mrs. McAdoo, 
and so on ad infinitum. How we nearly burst with pride during 
the recital of the wonders worked by "Gloria Hancock," called "Old 
Glory," on the battlefields across the seas. Her real name was 
Madelon Battle, of Asheville, North Carolina, and she married 
Major Hancock of the British Fusilliers. Four times she was deco- 
rated for services and for total disregard of her personal safety. 
She wears the French Cross of War; she was decorated by the 
English King, and by the King of Belgium. I am told that her 
picture has a place in the Hall of Fame at Washington, D. C. 

So it is in all the ways of the world Saint Mary's girls hold honor- 
able place. It was not for naught they lit their tapers at the torch of 
Alma Mater. 

When I was at Saint Mary's the place was hallowed by the sweet 
and kindly presence of Dr. Bennett Smedes, and I have in mind, 
; also, another of those Heaven-sent teachers whom it is my delight to 
honor. And now, after waiting all these years to have my say, and 
with an audience that fills the amplest requirements, words fail me. 
i I would like to tell you of my friend and teacher, Doctor Emily 
Watts McVea. 

She was graduated from Saint Mary's in 1884, and was Lady 
Principal of Saint Mary's during the closing years of Dr. Bennett 
Smedes's career. She was bound to the school by ties of kinship as 
well as loyalty. But that is not what makes her the theme of my 
story. It is to the woman that she is I wish to pay tribute. 

On that first lonesome day when I first entered the school and was 
presented with my list of classes every one commiserated with me. 
"What!" they said, "all those classes under 'Emmie Mack'! Then 
may good fortune help you to 'get by'." But it was my luck — my 
tremendous good luck — that I should recite to her two-thirds of 
my time. 

She taught without books and without notes. That General Litera- 
ture course was a marvelous accomplishment. It began with the 
^creation of the world, I believe, and took in all ages and nations and 



38 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

peoples and kindred and tongues. It moved down the ringing grooves 
of change with a grand sweep, pointing here and there to the theme 
of a time, and the living exponent of that theme. The picture of a 
period glowed beneath the kindling touch into vividness, the elabora- 
tions of detail taking their places like the folds of a graceful garment 
about a pulsating figure. 

This was my first acquaintance with bigness ; it was, in fact, per- 
haps the biggest thing I had ever tried to grasp. ISTo doubt, it should 
have inspired me to do big things, but it was really much too large 
for me, and I was staggered at its size. That was the magnificent 
scale on which her magnificent brain worked. If ever she should be 
unappreciated it would be because her hearers could not follow where 
she led. Vigorous, tireless, ambitious, working — always working — 
urging others to work, cheerful, optimistic, inspiring, modest, self- 
abnegating, earnest, and, withal, humorous — a revelation, indeed. 

After Dr. Bennett Smedes was laid to rest and the school passed 
into the hands of others, Miss McVea felt at liberty to follow her 
own dreams. She took some special work at the University of North 
Carolina and at Columbia University. After that she was in Cin- 
cinnati for some dozen years as Dean of the Women's Department 
of the University of Cincinnati. Lately she has received the degree 
of Litt.D. from the University of North Carolina, and just now is 
President of Sweet Briar College, Virginia. 

While in Cincinnati she identified herself with all the activities of 
the city to such an extent that when she was about to leave there the 
whole city gave her an ovation. I said "the whole city" ; this was 
true. Really, there was a large auditorium crowded to the doors to 
bid farewell to this unassuming Tar Heel. On the rostrum with her 
were a number of representatives from the various organizations of 
the town — the Women's Club, the Civic League, the Y. M. C. A., 
the Y. W. C. A., the S. P. C. A., welfare workers, community work- 
ers, and so on. Upon the speaker's table was placed a jeweled casket 
of gifts and tokens, testimonials of esteem. Tributes were paid by 
chosen speakers, who rehearsed their recognition of the inspiration 
she had been to them. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 39 

At length she was called on for a reply, amidst a storm of applause. 
Almost overcome with surprise and modesty, she remarked that she 
was reminded of the old nursery tale of Mother Hubbard, in her 
amazement, "If I be I, as I think I be," and quietly sat down. The 
papers of the city had columns on the subject at the time, and were 
copied in those of our State. The event was remarked the country 
over. 

I hope that she will bless this world for many years to come. I 
congratulate every girl at Sweet Briar, and I wish she were the per- 
petual Lady Principal of Saint Mary's. 

As to Saint Mary's today, we have much to be encouraged about, 
seeing that the success and progress of the school is unquestioned. 
This is only one among the many schools that were begun in different 
parts of the country at the same time, but it is one of three that 
remain. Let us be loyal to Saint Mary's by word and act, and pray 
that she may be the steadying influence in a time that is now dis- 
traught with many upsetting problems. 

Norfolk and Portsmouth Chapter 

Miss Margaret C. Jordan, of Portsmouth, Va., reports the follow- 
ing news from the Norfolk and Portsmouth Chapter : 

Mr. and Mrs. James Jordan, of Norfolk, Va., have a son, 
James, Jr. 

Dorothy Nottingham Hopkins and Charles Frederick Wilkins, Jr., 
1 were married, April 17, 1921. Home on Eastern Shore, Va. 

Bertha Lloyd Freeman and Augustus Crenshaw Reed were mar- 
i ried, May, 1921. Home in Meadowbrook, Va. 

Nannie Tucker and J. Chapman were married last fall in Grifton, 

N. C. ■ 

Elizabeth Mortimer Darst and Lieutenant Lars Oscar Peterson, 
IT. S. N., were married November 13, 1921. Home in Ports- 
mouth, Va. 



40 Saint Maby's School Bulletin 



ALUMNAE NOTES 

Mrs. Walter Simpson, nee Miss Ebie Roberts, has paid us several 
visits since her marriage. At her first appearance in the dining-room 
at dinner, several tables loudly cheered for "Miss Ebie." Another 
enterprising table rejoined with a "tiger" for "Mrs. Simpson." 

Dorothy Ambler visited her sister for several days on her way to 
and from New York. 

Rebecca Wall, from Hillsboro, came over to see us in February 
while she was visiting the Camerons. 

Mrs. Troy Myatt (Mary Ellen Travis) came up to the school in 
January when she was visiting in Raleigh for a few days. 

We enjoyed seeing Catherine Miller, from Richmond, while she 
was staying at the home of Mary Hoke, who graduated in the same 
class. 

Ellen and Elizabeth Lay and Katherine Batts came up to see us 
on their return from the January tour of the Carolina Playmakers. 
Katherine took the title-role in Elizabeth Lay's play, "Trista." 

Eleanor Sublett, Susan Collier, Lena Simmons, Dorothy Simmons, 
Sophronia Cooper, Tommy Johnson, Hunk Venable, and Elizabeth 
Waddell came over for the Pavlowa ballet on the 4th of March. 
Susan Collier and Lena Simmons stayed at the school with Lorraine 
Smythe. 

Jane Toy, Mary Yellott, and Julia Cooper, some of the Saint 
Mary's coeds at Carolina, came to see us for a few minutes on Sun- 
day afternoon, March 12th. 

Anne White, at Saint Mary's in 1916, is now visiting Pinehurst, 
New Jersey, just back from a six-months stay in California. 

Helen Battle is studying in New York, at the New York School of 
Fine and Applied Arts. 

We are interested to know that several old Saint Mary's girls are 
abroad. Sallie and Belle Cameron have been in Egypt and expect 
to stay in Italy and France with their aunt until May. Frances Kern 
is at school in Paris. Peggy Edmundson is visiting her brother, who 
is in government service, stationed at Coblenz, Germany. She is 
studying German and French. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 41 

Mary Ljbrook Lassiter intends to sail for Europe in June, and we 
hear that Doris Swett is making similar plans. 

The Rev. Mr. Albert Cooper and Mrs. Cooper (Miss Elizabeth 
Cheshire) are home on a furlough and now are at "Ravenscroft." 
Mr. and Mrs. Cooper have been at Ichang, China, for thirteen years. 
This is the most distant mission station which we have. They expect 
to sail for China on August 10, 1922. 

The engagement of Miss Hannah Ashe and Mr. William Bason 
has been announced. The date for the wedding will be announced 
later. 



42 Saint Maky's School Bulletin 



MARRIAGES 

Helen Amanda Delemar and Mr. Horace D. Croekford, January 
21, 1922. Home in Chapel Hill, K". C. 

Beatrice Josephine Parker and Mr. William Beauregard Young, 
Jr., February 1, 1922. Home in Wilson, N. C. 

Irene Augusta Smith and Mr. David Collin Barnes, July 4, 1922. 
Home in Murfreesboro, N. C. 

Lanie Stanton Hales and Mr. Henry Rodley Swartzell, February 
25, 1922. Home in Wilson, N. C. 

Annette Lawrence and Mr. John White Ives, December 28, 1922. 
Home in Smithfield, N. C. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 43 



IN MEMORIAM 

The Edenton Chapter sends the sad report that Katherine and 
Marian Drane have lost their mother. Mrs. Robert Drane passed to 
her reward on Christmas Eve. All Edenton, as well as her bereaved 
family, miss her beloved presence. Her life was, indeed, a benedic- 
tion to all those who knew her. 

Erom the Edenton Chapter also comes the news of the death of one 
of Saint Mary's oldest students, Mrs. Elizabeth Brazier Creecy Wins- 
ton. She passed away on Christmas morning, and is survived by two 
brothers, three sisters, one daughter, Mrs. Charles Wales, of Edenton ; 
two grandsons, Thomas H. Winston, of Philadelphia, and Charles 
Wales, Jr., of Edenton. "Betty Creecy," as she was known at Saint 
Mary's in '72, was the daughter of Col. R. B. Creecy, originally of 
Edenton, but for many years editor and publisher of The Economist, 
of Elizabeth City, one of the best-edited papers of his day; he was 
the author of "Grandfather's Tales of North Carolina." Mrs. Wins- 
ton leaves a host of friends. She was laid to rest in the churchyard 
of Saint Thomas's Episcopal Church at Windsor, N. C. 



Saint 2tTarjj's 

5c 




Haietgij, Hortff Carolina 



lulbtitt 

(ftommtttretttttit Number 
Ifmte, 11922 



June, 1922 Series 11, No. 4 



SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 

BULLETIN 

RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



PUBLISHED QUARTERLY BY SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL 
RALEIGH, NORTH CAROLINA 



Entered July 3, 1905, at Raleigh, N. O, as Second-class Matter 
Under Act of Congress of July 1 6, 1 894 



CONTENTS 



PAGE 

Collects 3 

Alma Mater {Poem) H, E. H. 4 

Commencement Program .- 5 

Alumna? Luncheon 9 

Art and Home Economics Exhibits 11 

Annual Concert 12 

Commencement Day Exercises 12 

The 1922 Commencement Awards 16 

Recessional Hymn 20 

The Graduates : 21 

The College Honors of 1922 21 

The Class Essay ("Cullud" Folks) Elizabeth Lawrence 22 

The Class Day Exercises 35 

The Class Poem 36 

The Prophecy of the Class of 1922 Lenore Powell 37 

Last Will and Testament of the Class of 1922 41 

Aluinme Who Attended Commencement 43 

Editorials 45 

School News 47 



Saint Ittary's School Bulletin 

Commencement Number 
June, 1922 Series 11, No. 4 



O God, Holy Ghost, Sanctifier of the faithful, visit, we pray Thee, this 
School with Thy love and favor ; enlighten our minds more and more with 
the light of the everlasting Gospel ; graft in our hearts a love of the truth ; 
increase in us true religion ; nourish us with all goodness ; and of Thy great 
mercy keep us in the same, O blessed Spirit, whom, with the Father and the 
Son, together, we worship and glorify as one God, world without end. Amen. 



Almighty Father, whose mercy is over all Thy works, bless, we beseech 
Thee, with Thy providential care Saint Mary's School and all schools and col- 
leges of Christian education, and prosper all right efforts for their support. 
Help us in the work being done for the improvement and endowment of this 
School, to pray earnestly, to labor diligently, and to give generously. Grant 
to the teachers and the taught the light of Thy Holy Spirit to lead them into 
all truth and to build them up in Christian Grace and character : for the 
sake of Thy Kingdom and the honor of Thy name, through Jesus Christ, our 
Lord. Amen. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Alma Mater 

(Tune: "Believe Me, If All Those Endearing Youns Charms") 

Saint Mary's ! wherever thy daughters may be 

They love thy high praises to sing, 
And tell of thy beauties of campus and tree, 

Around which sweet memories cling ; 
They may wander afar, out of reach of thy name, 

Afar, out of sight of thy grove, 
But the thought of Saint Mary's aye kindles a flame 

Of sweet recollection and love. 

Beloved Saint Mary's ! how great is our debt ! 

Thou hast cared for thy daughters full well ; 
They can never thy happy instructions forget, 

Nor fail of thy virtues to tell. 
The love that they feel is a heritage pure ; 

An experience wholesome and sweet. 
Through fast rolling years it will grow and endure ; 

Be a lamp and a guide to their feet. 

May the future unite all the good of thy past 

With the best that new knowledge can bring. 
Ever onward and upward thy course ! To the last 

Be thou steadfast in every good thing. 
Generations to come may thy fair daughters still 

Fondly think on thy halls and thy grove 
And carry thy teachings — o'er woodland and hill — 

Of earnestness, wisdom, and love. 

H. E. H., 1905. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Commencement Program 

Saturday, May 20. 

8 :30 p.m. Annual Recital of the Expression Department in the Auditorium. 
Shakespeare's "As You Like It." 

Sunday, May 21 

8 :00 a.m. Celebration of the Holy Communion in the Chapel. 
11 :00 a.m. Morning Prayer in the Chapel with Commencement Sermon by 
Rt. Rev. Thomas C. Darst, D.D., Bishop of East Carolina. 
5 :00 p.m. Alumnse Service in the Chapel. 

Monday, May 22. 

11 :00 a.m. Class Day Exercises in the Grove. 

4 :30 p.m. Annual Alumna? Meeting in the Parlor. 

5 :30 p.m. Art and Home Economics Exhibits in the Art Building. 
8 :30 p.m. Annual Concert in the Auditorium. 

9 :30 p.m. Rector's Reception in the Parlor. 

Tuesday, May 23. 

11 :00 a.m. Graduating Exercises in the Auditorium. 

Annual Address by President Howard E. Rondthaler, D.D., of 

Salem College, Winston-Salem, N. C. 
Prayers in the Chapel and Presentation of Diplomas by Rt. Rev. 
Joseph B. Cheshire, D.D., Bishop of North Carolina. 

Saturday 

The Dkama.tic Club Play 

Commencement began this year with Shakespeare's "As You Like 
It," delightfully presented by the Dramatic Club. The interpreta- 
tion of the play, refreshing in simplicity of background, costumes and 
action, reflected great credit on the director, Miss Florence C. Davis. 
The characters, well assigned, were vivid, alive, genuine. At no time 
did the action drag. The scenery, a simple background of small pine 
trees artistically arranged, created the atmosphere of romance and 
adventure ideal for this most charming romantic comedy. The cast 
of characters was as follows : 



6 Saint Mart's School Bulletin 

Duke, living in banishment Evelina Beckwith 

Frederick, his brother and usurper of his dominions Helen Blackmore 



Amiens 
Jacques 
First Lord 
Second Lord 



Lords attending on the banished Duke< 



Martha T. Everett 
Daisy Strong Cooper 
Josephine Gould 
Elizabeth Ballou 



Le Beau, a courtier attending upon Frederick Lila Callum 

Charles, wrestler to Frederick Annie Louise Thompson 

Oliver "j ( Lucy Lay 

Jacques V Sons of Sir Rowland de Boys 1 Eunice Dixon 

Orlando j ( Lenore Powell 

Adam, servant to Oliver Helen Bryan Chamberlain 

Touchstone, a clown Edith. Lorraine Smythe 

Corin i Shepherds.... F Evelyn Randolph Tyson 

Silvius J '"[ Susan Fitchett 

William, a country fellow in love with Audrey Margaret Wood 

Rosalind, daughter to the banished Duke Mary Louise Everett 

Celia, daughter to Frederick Muriel Dougherty 

Phebe, a shepherdess Marjorie Page 

Audrey, a country wench Helen Muse 

Attendants. < Frances Hoskins 



Elizabeth Moore 
Peasants : Isabella Lowry, Augusta Martin, Mary Hardy, Kathryn Hitchcock. 

Honorable mention could be made of all the cast. Mary Louise 
Everett was a beautiful Rosalind both as a maid and as a masquerad- 
ing youth; Muriel Dougherty, as Celia, also did excellent work. 
Lenore Powell was a captivating Orlando, never once losing character. 
Lorraine Smythe as Touchstone, with Helen Muse as Audrey, won 
enthusiastic applause. Miss Smythe, who this year has completed 
the three years' course in Expression, recalled to many of the audi- 
ence her success, two years ago, as Sir Toby in "Twelfth Night." 
Another certificate pupil, Daisy Strong Cooper, read well the famous 
seven ages speech of the melancholy Jacques. The work of Helen 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Bryan Chamberlain as Adam, of Evelina Beckwith as the banished 
duke, and of Marjorie Page as Phebe also deserve mention. The 
performance, as a whole, was happily free from artificiality and was 
received with enthusiastic approval by the large audience composed 
of alumnse, relatives, and friends of the amateur performers. 

Sunday 

The baccalaureate sermon was delivered this year by Rt. Rev. 
Thomas C. Darst, D.D., Bishop of East Carolina. The News and 
Observer wrote of the sermon as follows : 

Following the crowd rarely leads anywhere, the Rt. Rev. Thomas Campbell 
Darst, D.D., Bishop of the Diocese of East Carolina, told the Senior Class of 
Saint Mary's School yesterday morning when for the second time since he 
was elevated to the bishopric he preached the baccalaureate sermon at that 
institution. 

"Be ye not conformed to the world, but be ye transformed," was the text 
around which Bishop Darst built his sermon. The beacons of history he 
marshalled before them, men and women who declined to accept the low 
standards of their day as the standard for their own lives, and in their 
refusal to conform, paved the way to all the generations who have come after 
them to better living and higher service to their day. 

Abraham, Joshua, Martin Luther, and Latimer and Ridley, who went down 
to the valley of decision, and came up, often alone in their own generation, 
but through all the time to come, heroes whose refusal to conform to low 
standards has lighted the way for the world to better things. 

"In a day when the standards of living have fallen a little bit too low, the 
question comes inevitably to you — 'Shall I follow the crowd, shall I conform 
to the standards of my day, or shall I look up to the hills, and be transformed 
by the power of God to higher things?' 

"You are living in a day when a stroke for higher and better living will 
count for far more than it ever counted before. The whole world looks 
toward America, the only nation whose manhood and whose faith is not 
spent, for inspiration to go on. In your hands is placed the decision. Will 
America live up to that great trust? The answer is in the hands of you 
young women, and of other classes of young men and young women all over 
this land." 

At the five o'clock service Sunday afternoon, the Rector wel- 
comed back to their Alma Mater, the visiting Alumnse. He spoke 
of the high place in honest scholarship and high moral standards 
held for so many years by Saint Mary's School, and appealed to her 
daughters both young and old, to help maintain this standard by 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



earnest effort towards progress. JNor were the officers and faculty 
forgotten ; for Mr. -Way took this opportunity to thank them and the 
student body for their conscientious service and loyal co-operation 
throughout the year. 

Monday 

Monday morning at four o'clock, alarm clocks advertised the fact 
that the Juniors were about the business of the Daisy Chain. At 
breakfast they were limp but triumphantly sure it was the "prettiest 
daisy chain ever seen at Saint Mary's !" And so it proved later 
when at eleven o'clock it was brought in by the Class of '22 led by 
the Chief Marshal, Lucy Lay, and laid on the ground in front of 
the Class. 

The Class Day exercises, presided over by Mary Louise Everett, 
the President of the graduating Class, were held, as has long been 
the custom, in the grove directly in front of Smedes Hall. The roll 
was called by Hilda Turrentine, Secretary of the Class ; Muriel 
Dougherty read the history of the Class ; Louise Egleston, the Poem ; 
Elizabeth Lawrence read the Last Will and Testament of the Class 
of '22. Then followed a very amusing Class Prophecy by Lenore 
Powell. 

After the Class Songs, Mr. Way presented the graduating class 
with a picture, a water-color sketch of Blue Mountain Lake, as an 
expression of his gratitude for their co-operation in upholding the 
ideals of Saint Mary's. Two members of the incoming Senior Class, 
Lucile Dempsey and Martha Best, brought forward the picture, 
unveiled it, and placed it on the ground directly in front of the table 
at which Miss Everett was presiding. To Lenore Powell and Louise 
Egleston was awarded the Stone loving cup for the best literary 
program of the year. Then came the moment of excitement for the 
Literary and Athletic Societies. By Evelina Beckwith, President of 
Epsilon Alpha Pi Literary Society, was presented to Josephine Rose, 
President of Sigma Lambda Literary Society, the cup for winning 
the literary contests; by Julia Winston Ashworth, President of the 
Mus, was presented to Dorothy Xixon, President of the Sigmas, the 
banner for winning the championship for the year 1921-22. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 9 

Miss Helen Budge, the editor-in-chief, then read the dedication of 
the Annual Muse to Miss Lizzie H. Lee, and gift copies of The Muse 
were presented to the Bishop, the Rector, the Commencement speakers 
and others. 

Miss Everett, representing the Senior Class, announced as the gift 
of the Class of 1922 to the School, a drinking fountain to be placed 
on the ground floor of Smedes Hall. After the Seniors had sung 
"Grood-bye, School," there was a thrilling twenty minutes for the 
giving out of the annuals. 

The members of the Alumnae Association held their annual ban- 
quet at the Woman's Club at 1 :00 p. in., entertaining as guests the 
members of the graduating class, Mr. and Mrs. Way, and such mem- 
bers of the faculty as they wished to honor in that way. 

Alumnae Meeting — Alumnae Luncheon 

The annual Alumnae Luncheon held on May 22d at the Woman's 
Club was, as usual, a most delightful affair. 

The Raleigh Chapter, headed this year by Mrs. R. B. Raney and 
her able assistants Mesdames Louise Mahler, John London, J. J. 
Bernard, and Miss Mattie Bailey, managed to turn that most business- 
like of places, the Club Assembly Hall, into a bower of beauty. 
Larkspur, sweet peas, pinks, and other old-fashioned flowers twined 
themselves as if by magic through lattices, hung gracefully upon the 
small stage and showered the long tables in profusion. By each 
guest's plate was a tiny, exquisite bouquet- — the work, it is said, of 
the diligent fingers of the Misses Lucy and Albertina Moore, and 
Elizabeth Dortch. Across the stage hung Japanese lanterns, also 
adding their touch to the pretty background, where sang and danced 
the three little maids from Japan, Peek Bo, Pittising and Yum- Yum, 
and the stalwart lover Nanki-Poo and his jealous rival Ko-Ko. 
Straight from the land of the Mikado they seemed to come for the 
entertainment of the visitors, but they were only present-day Saint 
Mary's girls entertaining Saint Mary's girls of other years. 

There were a hundred and fifty-one Saint Mary's daughters 
gathered, from "Miss Katie" who came to school in '67 to the grad- 



10 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

nates of 1922. One class, that of 1918, had its reunion, and joyously 
did the members greet each other. The room was filled with happy 
chatter as old acquaintances were renewed amid the serving of the 
delicious luncheon. Mrs. Warren Way, our Rector's wife, acted as 
toast-mistress and at her call some of the older alumna? rose and told 
of their classes of bygone days. Of course as "oldest living alumna" 
Miss Katie led with memories of Dr. Aldert Smedes' time ; and others 
rose and spoke tenderly of their fellow classmates and the honors won 
in the "old days." 

A business meeting followed the luncheon, presided over by Mrs. 
Watkins Robards. She rendered a splendid report of her work as 
president for the year just ended, and presented Miss Davis of Saint 
Mary's faculty, to tell the Alumna? something of the spectacular 
pageant "The Cross Triumphant," just held in Washington, D. C. 
Miss Davis had just witnessed this pageant and was so moved by 
its splendor, beauty, and dignity that she quite stirred the Alumnae. 
They were unanimous in wishing to present the pageant at Saint 
Mary's in the fall for the benefit of the endowment fund. But it 
was felt by every one present that the deeply religious sentiment of 
the pageant and the good rendered Saint Mary's by the uniting of all 
her loyal daughters in one concerted effort in her behalf would far 
outweigh any money gained. Numbers offered their support in 
sponsoring different scenes, and later on a Pageant Committee was 
formed with Mrs. Nannie Ashe as chairman, and a score of en- 
thusiastic helpers at her call. 

Officers for the Alumna? Association for 1922-1923 were then 
elected, as follows : Mrs. Louis Sutton, president ; Mrs. Robert 
Miller, vice-president ; Miss Kate McKimmon, secretary ; Miss Louise 
Busbee, assistant secretary, and Mrs. W. A. Withers, treasurer. 

Guests and delegates at the luncheon were from the chapters of 
Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Durham, Hillsboro, Louisburg, Rockingham, 
Portsmouth, Va., Scotland Neck, Edenton, Winston-Salem, Tarboro 
and Raleigh. 

Cantey Venable Sutton. 



Saint Maky's School Bulletin 11 

A pleasant interruption in the strictly school festivities was made 
by a garden party given five p. m. Monday, at the home of Mrs. 
Samuel Lawrence. The guests were visiting relatives of the grad- 
uating class and the officers and members of the faculty of Saint 
Mary's. This courtesy of Mrs. Lawrence's was fully in keeping with 
the gracious spirit of hospitality which has been shown by her 
throughout the year to Saint Mary's School. 

Art and Home Economics Exhibits 

On the second floor of the Art Building were two interesting ex- 
hibits. Of the Art Exhibit, the News and Observer said: 

A visit to the studio is unusually worth while this year. It is a large 
exhibit and displays some excellent work. Ten beginners make a good show- 
ing with their studies of blacks and shaded still life. The most striking 
designs are four by Macon Walters, Joe McMillan, Katherine Hitchcock, and 
Nellie Newton. An interior done by Isabella Lowry catches the eye. 

In the second year work the tinted charcoal is very attractive. "Apples," 
by Elizabeth Cheatham, and "Bottles," by Lucile Dempsey are well rendered. 

Among the original posters all of which are done in true poster style, the 
best three were done by Joe McMillan, Elizabeth Cheathem and Dorothy 
Jones. "Wistaria" and a "Sketch of West Rock" by Anne Jordan are well 
done. 

Four girls are taking their certificates in Art this year. Van Cleve 
Wilkins has done splendid work in oils. The "Window with sun light 
streaming through" is effective. Some good time sketches done in two to 
four hours and a group of "Bottles," were displayed. Josephine Forbes' "In- 
terior" and "Fruit" are very pleasing. Lucile Dempsey has three "Outdoor 
sketches" and "Vegetable group." Josephine Rose's "Cheese group" and 
"Sweet Williams" and a delicate toned Venetian scene stand out. 

Altogether, it is a fine showing of hard earnest work on the part of the 
students and their teacher, Miss Clara Fenner. 

In the room next to the studio, second year students of Domestic 
Art showed the results of their last half-year's work. Dainty crea- 
tions of bright-colored organdies, hats to match, and exquisitely made 
underwear were pleasingly displayed. 



12 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Annual Concert 

The annual concert, given in the Auditorium at 8 :30 p. m., under 
the direction of Mr. William H. Jones, was a splendid success, each 
member receiving genuine applause. 

The stage with its background of green and Dorothy Perkins roses made 
a fitting background for the girls in their white frocks. 

Miss Marjorie Page with her clear dramatic soprano voice and captivating 
manner won the audience. In "Caro Nome" from Rigoletto by Verdi, her 
high notes were sweet and clear. Miss Bessie Brown was at her best in the 
"Irish Love Song," by Lang. Her diction was splendid, every word being 
heard by the audience. A piano solo, "Pompadour's Fan," Cadman, by Miss 
Elizabeth Ragland was a favorite. Other numbers on the program were : 
a vocal solo, "Philomel" Cadman, by Miss Sarah Harrell ; a vocal solo, "Morn- 
ing" Oley Speaks, by Miss Helene Higgs ; a piano duet, "Le Soir," Chaminade, 
by Miss Lucy Tucker and Miss Fox. Other piano numbers were : "Ballet," 
Chaminade, Miss Martha Gresham ; Nocturne in G Minor, Chopin, Miss Annie 
Louise Thompson: "Chromatic Waltz," Godard, Miss Mary Powell; "Im- 
promptu," Faure, Miss Virginia Thigpen ; "Impromptu," Chopin, by Miss 
Louise Egleston. 

After the concert Rev. and Mrs. W. W. Way entertained at a reception in 
the school parlors in honor of the Senior Class. The receiving line was com- 
posed of Rev. and Mrs. Way, Bishop and Mrs. Joseph Blount Cheshire, Dr. 
Howard E. Rondthaler, president of Salem College ; Bishop Darst, of Wilming- 
ton ; Miss Katie McKimmon, Miss Morgan, Miss Turner, and the members of 
the Senior Class. Receiving in the hall were : Miss Lizzie Lee and Mr. and 
Mrs. W. E. Stone. — The News and Observer. 

Tuesday 

The Commencement Day Exercises 

At 11 o'clock the Auditorium was thronged with friends and 
relatives of the graduating class. In a few minutes, the student body, 
dressed in white, were seated in the places reserved for them in the 
front seats of the Auditorium ; the certificate pupils directly in front 
of the stage. Then, when the Trustees had taken their places on the 
platform, the twenty-two graduates in caps and gowns were led in by 
their Marshal, Helen Webb. The following program was presented: 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 13 



Prayer Rt. Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire 

Song By the School 

Salutatory Louise Aiken Egleston 

Class Essay: "CicllucV Folks Elizabeth Lewis Lawrence 

Address Rev. Howard E. Rondthaler, D.D. 

Valedictory Mary Wiatt Yarborough 

Announcement of Honors. 

Presentation of Diplomas, Certificates, and Distinctions. 

Song By the School 

The News and Observer said of Dr. Rondthaler's speech : 

Dr. Rondthaler's speech was full of rippling wit and sound common sense, 
which showed in him not only the theologian and educator but the humorist 
and the thinker. He would speak, he said, on the by-products of education. 
In a few words he brought home to the audience the importance of by-products 
in the commercial and industrial world, showing the sheer romance in the 
sudden rise to predominance on the part of the humble cotton seed and the de- 
spised coal-tar. 

"If these things are true in the commercial world," he said, "may we not 
apply the same theory with the same expectations to the process which we 
term 'formal education?' May we not miss the primary product for which 
we sought in education and yet obtain a dross more precious than the gold? 

"One of the chief by-products and hand-maidens of Science is mathematics, 
that terrible Waterloo of so many conscientious students. And yet when we 
seek to find the by-products of Math we run across such shining virtues as 
Care, Deliberation, Accuracy, Consecutiveness, and power and delight in 
Reason. I am always afraid to argue, to debate or to reason with a man who 
has not mastered the fundamentals of Math, for in the last analysis the only 
reason he can give for his views is 'just because.' 

"There is a high moral joy that comes to the student as a result of the 
sacred service of mathematics in its merciless exposure of error. There is 
also a kind of a divine satisfaction in the infinitudes of the ratio 'Pi' and in 
the endless curves of the sweeping parabola. I am sure that such infinite 
facts must lead straight to God/' 

"The by-product of history is a well-founded optimism," Dr. Rondthaler 
continued, paying a high compliment to Kemp Plummer Battle* his history 
teacher at the University of North Carolina. "You may forget every date 
from cover to cover in the history book, and yet obtain the inspiriting by- 
product of the course." 

Dr. Rondthaler spoke of the delay in creating a Congress for the United 
States following the Revolutionary War. "In view of present-day conditions," 
he said, "I have my doubts whether the ultimate establishment of the Congress 
was such a fortunate step, after all." 

"The by-products of language is in the words themselves. It is most inter- 
esting to notice the thrilling history of the everyday words that have come on 



14 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



long pilgrimages from Damascus, Gaza, Calcutta, and other out-of-the-way 
places to lend themselves to our tongue-tips in the embellishment of our daily 
speech. 

"Think of the suggestions of words in the light of their own significance. 
How the word 'trivial' comes from the Latin 'tres via,' meaning three ways ; 
how 'rival' formerly meant the opposite sides of a river ; how 'derrick' was 
the name of England's most expert hangman, and how 'tariff' takes its name 
from the piratical cliffs of Spain — a touch of it yet, methinks, in the modern 
application of the word. 

"The noblest by-product of the arts is service, for we would miss the highest 
part of the mastery of the arts if service to others did not grow out of it. 
And yet service is not service unless it embraces the principles of conscious 
self-sacrifice. 

"We come to the greatest by-product of all education," Dr. Rondthaler con- 
cluded, "when we read in the unaffected text of Luke how at the age of twelve 
a young man journeyed up from his native Nazareth to the great college at 
Jerusalem, and there, after three days of study with the intellectual pre- 
dominants of the world, went back to his native village with the destiny of 
the world in his bosom." 

The latter part of the exercises were held in the chapel, where the 
program was : 

Processional Hymn, No. 396 : "Ten Thousand Times Ten Thousand." 

Scripture Lesson. 

BenediCtus. 

Creed. 

Prayers. 

Hymn No. 311 : "Ancient of Days." 

Presentation of Diplomas. 

Address to Graduates. 

Prayers and Benediction. 

Recessional Hymn : "Jerusalem, High Tower." 

Of Bishop Cheshire's address, The News and Observer said : 
Duty to be Beautiful 

"I want you all to be beautiful," said Right Rev. Joseph Blount Cheshire, 
Bishop of the Diocese of North Carolina, to the graduating class, in the 
chapel, after the diplomas had been presented. "It is your duty to be beauti- 
ful. This is easy for some and difficult for others, and you must remember 
that to be truly beautiful is to be satisfying to both mind and eye, with a true 
sense of proportion and a certain charm and grace which defies definition. 

"It is your duty to value this beauty and to cultivate it carefully, with due 
regard to your health, for our bodies are largely what we make them, and 
health is one of the primary assets to beauty of the mind and body. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 15 

"Physical beauty is not vain and useless, as certain philosophers will tell 
you," the Bishop said. "When you hear such statements, you do not believe 
them, for they are not so. But you must take care that your beauty is both 
unconscious and unselfish, for when it ceases to be so, it decays at the root 
and loses the very spirit of beauty itself. 

"The best and most potential kind of beauty is beauty of the heart and 
mind, which so shines out through the body that physical shortcomings are 
hidden and, indeed, in many cases, entirely eliminated, and through a kind of 
spiritual alchemy those faces which nature has given less beauty than others 
are imbued with a radiant charm. 

"Thus we see that it is the whole personality that is beautiful in the truest 
sense of the word, and not a mere part of the body. You must endeavor to 
make your physical and spiritual attributes more beautiful, remembering all 
the while that physical attractiveness is not a crime, but that 'a thing of 
beauty is a joy forever.' " 

The service was attended by two bishops — Bishop Cheshire and 
Bishop Darst. Other clergymen in the chancel were: Rev. J. E. 
Ingle, Eev. M. A. Barber, Rev. T. T. Walsh, Rev. F. P. Lobdell, 
Rev. R. B. Drane, Rev. George F. Hill, Rev. Cary Beckwith, and 
the Commencement speaker, Rev. Dr. Rondthaler. 

The following trustees were present : Dr. R. H. Lewis, Judge 
William Hoke, Col. C. E. Johnson, Dr. William Egleston, Mr. 
Thomas Battle, Mr. W. A. Erwin, Mr. George C. Royall, Mr. Charles 
Root. 

After the benediction was pronounced by Bishop Cheshire, the pro- 
cession marched out of the chapel in the following order : Students, 
graduates, faculty, trustees, and clergy. A long line was formed, 
from East to West Rock, to honor the clergy and trustees, who walked 
past them. Then the chief marshal, standing beneath the rose arch, 
ended the school year of 1922 with the words, "School is dismissed." 



16 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



The 1922 Commencement Awards 

Class Promotions, 1922 



TO BE SENIORS 



Mary Elise Ballard 
Elizabeth Wiggins Ballou 
Grace Elizabeth Barbour 
Martha S. Best 
Daisy Strong Cooper 
Lucile Margaret Dempsey 
Martha Caroline Gresham 
Annie Elizabeth Hickerson 
Ida Newsom Hinnant 
Claudia Jones 
Elizabeth Webb Josey 
Lucy Fitzhugh Lay 

Mary Elizabeth 



Edwina McMillan 
Edith Imogene Riddick 
Laura Clark Smith 
Ruth Doris Swett 
Virginia Gray Thigpen 
Evelyn Lee Way 
Mary Elizabeth Webb 
Helen Bond Webb 
Van Cleve Wilkins 
Marjorie Willard 
Margaret Raeburne Wood 
Nellie Jane Wynne 
Ziegler 



TO BE JUNIORS 



Ethel Hall Battle 
Blanche Bonner 
Huldah May Brinkley 
Helen Bryan Chamberlain 
Annie Thomas Davenport 
Susan MacPherson Divine 
Sophie Bonham Egleston 
Catherine Fisher 
Inez White Gold 
Lou Jones Hairston 
Sarah Moore Harrell 
Josephine Gulley Harris 
Leone Hardy Hines 

Mary Elizabeth 



Caroline Pasteur Holmes 
Addie Currier Huske 
Nancy Johnston 
Anne E. Jordan 
Lucy Henderson Kimball 
Lucy George Kittrell 
Alia Pittman Meredith 
Betty Parsons McConnell 
Jo Haywood McMillan 
Marjorie Helen Page 
Clare Ethel Spence 
Ruth Herbert Buxton White 
Margaret Whitehead 
Yarbrough 



TO BE SOPHOMORES 



Adna Lee Bailey 
Evelyn Gray Bartholomew 
Mary Wilson Bohannan 
Elizabeth Cheatham 
Alice Clarke 
Mary Louise Collier 
Clara Elizabeth Garrett 
Josephine Faithful Gould 



Robbie Louise McLean 
Catherine Allie Newton 
Mary Elizabeth Powell 
Florence Virginia Reinhart 
Elizabeth Bryan Rose 
Mary Grundy Rotter 
Annie Ruffin Sims 
Eugenia Flanders Trexler 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 17 



Katherine Harden Madeline Tripp 

Lila Dinavant Henkel Evelyn Randolph Tyson 

Kathryn Ogden Hitchcock Mildred Moore Waddell 

Dorothy Payne Jones Macon Walters 

Isabella Lowry Jessie E. White 

Rachel May Moore Anna Boyd Wilson 

Elizabeth Wooten McKenzie Sara Womble 

TO BE FRESHMEN 

Charlotte Stuart Armstrong Emily Elizabeth Hadlow 

Emily Roper Burgwyn Elizabeth Whitney Holt 

Dorothy Dougherty Willie Johnston 

Martha T. Everett Katherine Currin Morris 

Mary Perkins Gale Elizabeth Ragland 

Louise Scott 

The Honor Roll 

The highest general award of merit, open to all members of the 
School, is the Honor Roll, announced at Commencement. The re- 
quirements are : 

(1) The student must have been in attendance the entire session and have 
been absent from no duty at any time during the session without the full 
consent of the Rector, and without lawful excuse. 

(2) She must have had during the year a full regular course of study or 
its equivalent, and must have carried this work to successful completion, 
taking all required examinations and obtaining a mark for the year in each 
subject of at least 75 per cent. 

(3) She must have maintained an average of "Very Good" (90 per cent), or 
better, in her studies. 

(4) She must have made a record of "Excellent" (less than two demerits) 
in Deportment, in Industry, and in Punctuality. 

(5) She must have maintained a generally satisfactory bearing in the affairs 
of her school life during the year. 

The Honor Roll of 1921-22 

Mary Wiatt Yarborough 92. 

Edith Lorraine Smythe 90.97 

Jane Hodgson Turner 90.9 

Ruth Doris Swett 90.6 

Louise Egleston 90.11 

Mary Benthall Hardin 90. 

2 



18 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



The ISTiles Medal 

The ISTiles Medal, for General Excellence, was instituted by Rev. 
Charles Martin Mies, D.D., in 1906. It is awarded to the student 
who has made the best record in scholarship and deportment during 
the session. 

The medal is awarded to the same student only once. 

The requirements for eligibility are : 

(1) The student must have taken throughout the year at least "15 points" 
of regular work, and have satisfactorily completed this work, passing all 
required examinations. 

(2) She must have been "Excellent" in Deportment. 

(3) She must have taken all regular courses assigned, and have done satis- 
factory work in them. 

(4) She must be a regular student of the College Department. 

In accordance with these conditions, the sixteenth award of the 
Niles Medal is made to Miss Mary Wiatt Yarborough, Louisburg, 
of the Senior Class, whose average for the year is 92. 

Awards in the Music Department 

Certificate in Voice 
Bessie Rose Brown Greenville, N. C. 



Certificate in Piano 
Louise Aiken Egleston Hartsville, S. C. 



The Art Department 



Certificates 

Josephine Lewis Forbes Tarboro, N. C. 

Margaret Lucile Dempsey Goldsboro, N. C. 

Josephine Mann Rose Henderson, N. C. 

Van Cleve Wilkins Athens, Ga. 

The Home Economics Department 

Certificates 
Eunice Loraine Stockard Raleigh, N. C. 

Certificates in Domestic Science 

Alia Pittman Meredith Tarboro, N. C. 

Louise Jones Hairston Reidsville, N. C. 






Saint Mary's School Bulletin 19 



The Elocution Department 

Edith Lorraine Smythe Strawn, Texas 

Daisy Strong Cooper Oxford, N. 0. 

The Business Department 

Full Certificates 

Ruth Agnes Farr Cleveland, Ohio 

Mary Bridgeman Little Washington, N. C. 

Eva Pailin McMullan Elizabeth City, N. C. 

Charlotte Bryan Rodman Washington, N. C. 

Marcia Lingo Wilcox Morristown, N. J. 

Sarah Luranah Wright Centreville, Md. 

Certificate in Stenography and Typewriting 

Barbara Pow Ambler Asheville, N. C. 

Madge Purstelle Blakely Kingstree, S. C. 

Mary Benthall Hardin Wilmington, N. C. 

Mary Hester Lewis Tarboro, N. C. 

Margaret Anderson Matthews Raleigh, N. C. 

Lydia Virginia Storr Raleigh, N. C. 

Edith Lorraine Smythe Strawn, Texas 

Pauline Lyon Taylor Pittsboro, N. C. 

Jane Hodgson Turner Henderson, N. C. 

Certificate in Typewriting 

Catherine Hill Stephenson : Raleigh. N. C. 



20 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Recessional Hymn 

Jerusalem ! high tower thy glorious walls, 

Would God I were in thee ! 
Desire of thee my longing heart enthralls, 

Desire at home to be ; 
Wide from the world outleaping, 

O'er hill and vale and plain, 
My soul's strong wing is sweeping, 

Thy portals to attain. 

O gladsome day, and yet more gladsome hour ! 

When shall that hour have come 
When my rejoicing soul its own free power 

May use in going home? 
Itself to Jesus giving, 

In trust to His own hand, 
To dwell among the living 

In that blest Fatherland. 

What throng is this, what noble troop, that pours, 

Arrayed in beauteous guise, 
Out through the glorious city's open doors, 

To greet my wondering eyes? 
The hosts of Christ's elected, 

The jewels that He bears 
In His crown selected, 

To wipe away my tears. 

Unnumber'd choirs before the Lamb's high throne 

There shout the jubilee, 
With loud resounding peal and sweetest tone, 

In blissful ecstasy ; 
A hundred thousand voices 

Take up the wondrous song ; 
Eternity rejoices 

God's praises to prolong. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 21 



The Graduates 
The Class of 1922 

Julia Winston Ashworth Warrenton, N. C. 

Evelina Gilbert Beckwith Lumberton, N. .C 

Helen Porter Budge Miami, Fla. 

Elizabeth Warwick Cheek Henderson, N. C. 

Muriel Dougherty Washington, D. C. 

Louise Aiken Egleston Hartsville, S. C. 

Mary Louise Everett Rockingham, N. C. 

Susan Virginia Fitchett Cape Charles, Va. 

Josephine Lewis Forbes Tarboro, N. C. 

Kittie Lee Frazier Raleigh, N. C. 

Eva Lee Glass Orlando, Fla. 

Mary Louise Harding Greenville, N. C. 

Frances Springer Hoskins East Las Vegas, N. M. 

Elizabeth Lewis Lawrence Raleigh, N. C. 

Dorothy Gordon Nixon Hertford, N. C. 

Lenore Christine Powell Jacksonville, Fla. 

Josephine Mann Rose Henderson, N. C. 

Minnette Gordon Thompson Jacksonville, N. C. 

Hilda Grace Turrentine Kinston, N. C. 

Eugene Marion Wise Lincolnton, N. C. 

Dariel Beatrice Woodeson Raleigh, N. C. 

Mary Wiatt Yarborough Louisburg, N. C. 

The College Honors of 1922 

Salutatory 

It is a rare privilege which I have of welcoming back to Saint 
Mary's so many of our old friends who have trod before us the paths 
which we are leaving today— paths which we cannot help but feel are 
sacred. These old friends will know something of what we Seniors 
feel today as we leave forever the grove of stately oak trees and the 
dear little chapel, so famed in song and story. 

And to our new friends, here for the first time, I want to say that 
we hope and feel sure that you will be back again, year after year, 
as old friends. 

On behalf of the Senior Class of 1922 I bid you all welcome to the 
graduating exercises of this Eightieth Commencement. 



22 Saint Maky's School Bulletin 



The Glass Essay 

"Cullud" Folks 

When I read books written by morbid, brooding negroes who feel 
upon them the shadow of their race, I am dazed and hurt. When 
I come in contact with pushing, impertinent darkies, it leaves a bad 
taste in my mouth. But I love "cullud" folks — those happy, care- 
free people who have always been my friends and whom I dislike to 
consider a problem. 

Much has been written about that picturesque darkey — the slave 
of ante-bellum days — and still he is ever fresh and interesting, with 
his quaint, olden-time courtesy and unique observation of life. When 
the grey shadow of war passed away from the South, the slaves found 
themselves free. Freedom was to them a magic pass-word — an open 
sesame, which unlocked the doors of happiness. Eager to experience 
this long-dreamed-of miracle, they hurried away from the plantations 
on which they had spent their lives. With a childlike simplicity they 
expected to be clothed and fed just as they had always been. If a 
negro were asked whether he would hire himself, he would answer, 
arrogantly, "!NTaw, suh; I ain't goin' ter wuk no mo'; I'se a free 
nigger." 

A little bird, loosed from captivity, soon beginning to feel lost in 
the vastness of a strange and unfamiliar world, turns again to the 
friendly protection of the cage which it once looked upon as a prison. 
In the same way the darkies' thoughts turned with a wistful longing 
to the old life and their kind masters when, the novelty of freedom 
having worn off, they found it not to be what they had imagined. 
Howard Weeden has beautifully expressed this feeling in the lines of 
some of his "Bandanna Ballads" : 



And again : 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 23 

"I long to see a cotton field 
Once more before I go ; 
All hot an' splendid roll its miles 
Of sunny summer mow." 

"I long to feel de warm, sweet wind 
Blow down de river bank, 
Where fields of waving sugar-cane 
Are growing, rich an' rank." 

"Dar's always something wantin' 
In my joy at bein' free, 
When I think ol' master didn't 
Live to share dat joy with me." 

"Dem was mighty big plantations 

Dat he owned before de war, 
An' he, de kindes' master 
Dat darkies ever saw." 

As he brushed up against the world in the struggle to make a 
living, the darkey lost the unique personality that he had acquired on 
the isolated plantations, and his quaint dialect faded into ungram- 
matical English. 

Thus, with the passing of the conditions that had nurtured them, 
the slaves gave way to the rise of a new generation. But they are 
not entirely gone, for they have a special place in the memories of 
those who knew them. They still live in the droll tales of Joel 
Chandler Harris and in Thomas Nelson Page's exquisitely tender 
romances of the South that is gone. So strong is the appeal of this 
childishly simple folk of bygone days that we have given them in our 
memories a sort of halo, and have clothed them in a golden haze of 
romance which the prosaic generation of today rejects as too ideal. 
Yet I think he deserves all that has been attributed to him — this 
faithful slave of the past. Simplicity was his greatest charm, and 
loyalty his greatest virtue. The "quality negroes," as they were 
called, were as snobbish as the Carrolls of Carrollton. They were 
proud of the aristocracy and elegance of their "white folks," and 
never tired of singing their praises. The house servants, living as 
they did in close contact with their owners, soon began to imitate 



24 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

them in manners and morals. They caught the spirit of hospitality 
and cordiality so characteristic of the Southerners. When "com- 
pany" came, there was always Uncle Jim to take their horses to the 
stable. Curtseying and smiling behind her mistress was Mammy 
Chloe, waiting to carry the guests to their rooms and perform a dozen 
little services that were small in themselves, but added much to one's 
comfort and ease. The bond of love and devotion between the slaves 
and their masters cultivated in the latter not only mannerisms of 
kindness and charm, but also deeper emotions. 

That there is a deep appreciation of kindness in the negro's heart 
is manifested in the manner that the slaves carried on the work of 
the plantations while their masters were away at war, and in the dog- 
like fidelity with which they stayed with the women and children. 
The shrewd cunning of these old darkies is seen in their amusing 
encounters with the Federal soldiers. In "Order Number 11," a 
novel of plantation life in Missouri, there is the story of a young 
Confederate who came back from war wounded, and found his home 
abandoned. His old mammy, who had refused to leave, was the only 
living soul on the place. She took him into her little cabin and cared 
for him with as much tenderness and devotion as his own mother 
could have shown. When the Union soldiers marched by, the crafty 
old woman hung in a prominent place a United States flag which she 
had gotten from goodness knows where. When the Confederate sol- 
diers knocked on the door, she quickly hid the flag and brought out 
the grey uniform of her young master. 

There was in the darkey's mind a hazy idea of the Union soldier 
who was giving hirn freedom, but when the Yankee actually appeared 
on the scene the darkey edged nearer to his mistress. If it came to a 
choice between one of his white folks and a strange soldier, the darkey 
did not hesitate. Such a situation is given in Uncle Eemus's "Story 
of the War" : 

"I wuz standin' dat away in de aige er de woods, lookin' out 'cross 
a clearin'," Uncle Remus said, "w'en — pin" ! — out come a little bunch 
er blue smoke from de top er wunner dem big, lonesome-looking pines, 
en den — pow ! Sez I ter myse'f , sez I, 'Honey, you're right on my 



Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 25 

route, en I'll des see w'at kinder bird you got roostin' in you' ; en 
whilst I wuz a-lookin', out bus' de smoke — pif ! en den — bang ! Wid 
dat I des drapt back inter de woods, en sort a skeerted 'roun', so's ter 
git de tree 'twixt me en de road. I slid up putty close, en wadder 
you speck I see? Des ez sho's you're settin' dar lissenin', dey waz a 
live Yankee up dar in dat tree, en he was a-loadin' en a-shootin' at de 
boys, des ez cool as a cowcumber in de jew, en he had his horse 
hitched out in de bushes, 'kaze I hear de creeter tromplin' 'roun'. 
He had a spy-glass up dar, en wiles I was a-watchin' un 'im, he 
raise 'er up en look throo 'er, en den he lay 'er down en fix his gun 
fer ter shoot. I had good eyes in dem days, ef I ain't got 'urn now, 
en 'way up de big road I see Mars Jeems a-comin'. Hit wuz too fur 
ter see his face, but I know'd 'im by de filly w'at I raise fer 'im, en 
she wuz a-prancin' like a school-gal. I know'd dat man wuz gwineter 
shoot Mars Jeems ef he could, en dat wuz mo' en I could stan'. 
Many's en many's de time dot I nuss dat boy, en belt 'im in dese 
arms, en toted 'im on dis back, en w'en I see dat Yankee lay dat gun 
'cross a lim' en take aim at Marse Jeems, I up wid my ole rifle en 
shet my eyes en let de man have all she had." 

"Do you mean to say," the Northern lady to whom Uncle Remus 
was telling the story, inquired indignantly, "that you shot the Union 
soldier, when he was fighting for your freedom?" 

"Co'se, I know all about dat," responded Uncle Remus, "en it 
sorter made cole chills run up my back ; but w'en I see dat man take 
aim, en Marse Jeems gwine home ter Ole Miss en Miss Sally, I des 
disremembered all 'bout freedom en I lammed aloose." 

Negroes often show this touching devotion to the white families 
to whom they consider they belong. There is an old colored man 
who lives at the Soldiers' Home in Atlanta. "Ten Cent Bill" they 
call him, because, for every job, be the service great or small, he 
charges the same price, ten cents. Before the war, Bill was a slave 
and when his master went away to fight he went with him as his 
body servant. After the war Bill's master went to live at the 
Soldiers' Home and he was not forgotten by the faithful servant who 
shared his fortunes in peace and in war. Often Bill came to see his 



26 Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 

old master bringing him tempting delicacies or small sums of money 
as offerings of love and gratitude. When his master died, Bill brought 
money to the other old soldiers and now he lives at the Home himself 
and still charges "ten cents" for every job. 

The old darkies who took care of the white children loved them as 
much as their own pickaninnies and lavished much more affection on 
them. Fortunate is the child who has for a nurse a real old-fashioned 
mammy. I was only five when my own "Mammy Caline" died, but 
my vivid memories of her have been refreshed from hearing again 
and again of her amusing speeches. Mammy had not belonged to 
our family originally and her favorite threat when I was naughty 
was, "En if 'n you ain't gonna do like Mammy says, I's goin' right 
straight back to de Dickey's, deed I is." At that point I always 
wept and was ready to promise anything. When she was going to 
scold me Mammy invariably began with, "I tell you de truf 'Liza- 
beth" and I knew what was coming and begged "Don't tell me that 
truth Mammy, please don't tell me that truth." Mammy had great 
disdain for my young Mother's attempts at taking care of me. One 
afternoon, when I was playing on the porch, I tumbled down the 
steps. Before my frightened Mother could get to me Mammy had 
rushed out of the house like a whirlwind and gathered me into her 
comforting arms. As she rubbed my bruises and soothed my rumpled 
feelings, she muttered to herself in a conspicuously audible under- 
tone, "Miss 'Lizabeth ain't fitten fer ter take care ob dis chile, nohow. 
She doan pay no mo' 'tention to 'Lizabeth den if she wuz a Jack- 
rabbit." It was a day of gloom when Mammy died. The house 
seemed full of shadows and the atmosphere was heavy with a pene- 
trating sadness. It rained and rained and Mother cried and cried. 
Iso one paid any attention to me and I seemed always in the way. 
At last feeling hurt and lonesome I stole into the nursery and cried 
myself to sleep. 

There are few of the old slaves left now, for after the war when 
the slow and painful work of reconstruction began in the South the 
negroes left the plantations. Some of them went into "public work," 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 27 

that is work on the new railroads which were being constructed. 
Sometimes the farm negroes took up this work for a while after 
"laying by" time, leaving their families to gather the crops. 

At the railroad camps the negroes lived in temporary shacks 
weatherboarded with rough lumber ; the only furniture being the 
double-decked bunks which were nailed to the walls. The bed cloth- 
ing was simple ; straw for a mattress, straw for a pillow and sheets 
of straw. But the darkies didn't mind that. Slumber-land is the 
darkey's heaven and he is equally comfortable on the floor or on the 
softest bed. Sometimes as many as thirty-two negroes were crowded 
into one of these small three-roomed shanties, but in ordinary times 
the average number was eighteen. 

When they were not in their shacks the darkies spent their time at 
the "commissary" where they went to shoot craps or lounge on the 
counters and swap jokes and tell stories. The commissary was the 
supply store and the darkies could buy articles there on the security 
of "tickets" which represented their wages. When an article was 
purchased the ticket was punched for that amount and at the end of 
the week, the laborer received in cash the remainder of his wages. 
"Is de Commissary open on Sunday ?" one darky asked of another. 
"Yeah," was the reply, "but when yo' comes out, yoah ticket is 
gwinter look like a sieve." 

The darkies said they were worked from "can't to can't" which 
means from the time you can't see in the morning until the time you 
can't see at night. When work was over they sat on their doorsteps 
and sang. Singing is as natural to a darky as talking. The songs 
were very amusing and pictured with a certain dry humor the 
characteristics of the railroad camp life. One of these droll melodies 
had its origin in the preposterous lies told the darkies by the labor 
agents who were paid so much for every hand they brought into camp. 
These men had no scruples about inveigling the darkies to leave their 
homes by telling them marvelous tales of easy work and high wages. 
The darkies, of course, were chagrined and sorely disappointed when 
they arrived at camp and failed to find the ideal conditions which 
they had pictured. Too ignorant to figure out what was due on their 



28 Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 

commissary tickets, when pay day came, no matter how much money 
they received they were never satisfied and always felt cheated. The 
song ran like this : 

"Yo' kin wnk on de railroad, 

Yo' kin load up de freight, 

Yo' kin wuk bery early, 

Yo' kin wuk bery late, 

Meks no diffunce how yo' shine 

White man's sho gwinter figger out behind. 

Oh, it's hard, hard, hard, to be a nigger 

When yo' can't get yo' wages w'en deys due." 

It was during the evening too, that the darkies who were in charge 
of the cooking prepared the "rations" for the next day. The "rations" 
consisted mainly of impossible biscuits, saturated with soda and un- 
believably hard, made into sandwiches by inserting perfectly indi- 
gestible fried eggs and huge hunks of bacon. 

Thus the "public work" negroes spent their time — working in the 
day time as hard as they were made to and not an inch harder; 
returning at night to make their shacks ring with care free, childish 
laughter. Just as every dog has his day so has every darky and that 
day is Sunday. The "public work" darky's dream of bliss was to 
have a new pair of shoes every single Sunday, and only patent 
leather ones would do. He was willing to pay almost any price for 
them, providing that they were so shiny as to be rivaled only by the 
sun and his own black face. 

When a darky had on "brand-new" shoes and the gayest possible 
socks he wore without the least compunction the same dingy blue 
overalls that he had worked in all week, the trousers having been 
rolled up to display his dazzling footwear. On Monday the new 
shoes which had been worn with such pride the day before, would 
tramp away to work, for they must be worn out by the end of the 
week in order to make way for a new pair the following Sunday. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 29 

Happy was the darky who could keep his commissary ticket so free 
of holes that he would have enough money to buy his new shoes at 
the end of the week. 

For the most part the negroes were respectful to the white men in 
charge of them and the white men were kind and lenient to their 
laborers. Of course, there were cases when the darkies were mis- 
treated and not properly cared for, but this was the exception rather 
than the rule. The darkies called every white man "Captain." They 
worshipped those that were kind to them and had no use for those 
that were not. A few of the hands really made some progress in 
their work and when they got a little above the rest, their feeling of 
superiority was comical. One of these darkies who was smarter than 
the others, and got ahead of them, was Tom Brown. 

Tom Brown was a typical "railroad nigger," — big, black, greasy 
looking. As a half grown boy he had come to the railroad camp from 
a plantation in South Carolina. One day a young civil engineer came 
to the camp and asked the foreman for an active negro boy to help 
him with a piece of surveying. The foreman called Tom, and the 
engineer was so struck by the honesty and intelligence of the colored 
boy's face that he hired him at once. Tom soon became very efficient 
in his work. He learned how to make figures from those on the 
stakes and soon became so adept in the art of marking them that he 
excelled all the negroes and most of the white men. He was so proud 
of his attainments in the engineering profession that nothing de- 
lighted him more than to show off before the other negroes. He would 
stand before an envying and admiring crowd in front of the com- 
missary telling them of his work with ridiculous ostentation and ex- 
plaining it with the biggest technical words that he could pick up or 
manufacture. He was exceedingly ingenious in choosing his high- 
sounding phrases, never missing a chance to put in a word that the 
other darkies could not understand. He would never' say that he had 
found the point where two straight lines crossed but that he had 
"established an intersection of tangents." In his own estimation 
Tom's success was enormous. One day on the train his boss caught 
him staring out of the window at a group of negroes plowing in the 



30 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

fields. "Tom," he asked, "what are you studying about?" Tom 
straightened his lanky frame and answered grandly, "Captain, I 
wuz jes' thinkin' how I has riz." The civil engineer grew very 
fond of Tom and kept him even after the particular work for which 
he had engaged him was finished. There were many splendid traits 
in the darky, among which loyalty and honesty were not the least. 
Tom's philosophy of life was to be a "nigger" among white folks and 
the biggest negro among his own people. Once when he resented his 
boss calling him "nigger" the white man asked : "Well, Tom, if you 
aren't a nigger, what in the devil are you ?" "Ise a cullud genta- 
man," was the supercilious reply. "What's the difference?" his boss 
inquired, and Tom answered, "A cullud gentaman is a nigger wid 
de princii)les ob a white man." 

There are skeptical white people who believe that negroes are 
utterly devoid of the "principles of white men." I do not think that 
this is so, for again and again they show tendencies of reaching out 
for that which is good and pure. There is in a recent number of 
the Outlook, a wonderfully sweet and appealing story with a touch of 
pathos in it — a story which makes one glance up from the page and 
gaze out of the window for a long time with eyes thoughtful and sad, 
and mouth turned down at the corners. It is told by Mrs. L. H. 
Hammond and is about a North Carolina negro, James Dunston. 
Although he was born before the war, he had never been a slave, for 
his paternal grandparents had long ago been freed by their master. 
Once when James was only a child, a negro school was opened in a 
tumbled-down log cabin near the farm on which he lived with his 
parents. Eager to learn, he soon knew as much as the negro teacher 
which was only to read a few detached words. The young negro, 
however, was undaunted ; he wanted to learn to read and he never 
stopped until he reached his goal, though he had only a blue backed 
speller and his Bible to learn from and though he had no one to 
help him and little time to spare from his work in the fields. The 
ignorance of the darky, his illimitable desire to read and write and 
his patient effort to learn is pathetic. I remember sitting before the 
nursery fire with my old mammy, trying to teach her to read the 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 31 

simple sentences of my little primer. Again and again I spelled 
out the words for her and with unlimited patience she repeated them 
after me. So James Dunston struggled alone and after many years 
of labor he mastered his blue backed speller and became familiar with 
his Bible. When he grew up and married, James began the same 
hopeless life that his parents had led, struggling year in and year 
out to wring a living from the barren soil. Then one year he got a 
little ahead, not only was he not in debt but there were a few dollars 
left over. Both ends had met and still there was enough to tie a 
knot. Little by little the family forged ahead and soon, instead of 
renting the farm, they owned it. 

Colored people seem to have a feeling of responsibility for their 
own race; just as soon as James Dunston got ahead himself he 
wanted to help his less fortunate neighbors who were still going 
around and around in a circle. He knew several white men who 
trusted him and would lend him money, though they would not lend 
it to other darkies. So he borrowed enough to buy two thousand 
acres and on this land he settled a number of colored farmers whom 
he could trust. As soon as they could, they paid him for the land 
and he returned the money to the white men from whom he had 
borrowed it. The negroes given thus a start and a fair chance all 
made good, for James Dunston lived among them and taught them 
to improve their crops by methods which from experience he had 
found to be best. When the first set of farmers had paid for their 
land and were making a good living, James borrowed more money 
and bought another tract of land, this time fourteen hundred acres 
on which he settled a new set of men. For many years James Duns- 
ton has lived among his people teaching them how to make their farms 
pay and showing them by his work and example how to lead good 
Christian lives. He had always wanted to be a minister but con- 
sidered himself too ignorant. At last the call in his heart became so 
insistent that he no longer dared disobey it and he began to preach to 
the people of his community. They paid him a small salary and 
after much labor they erected a church. Next, they wanted a school- 
house. A kind white woman gave them a lot and the county paid 



32 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

half the expense of the building, the other half being contributed by 
the people of the community in money or in labor. James Dunston 
is so old that he can no longer do active work on his farm, but he 
now has four churches and preaches the gospel with a striking earnest- 
ness that touches the hearts of the white people as well as negroes. 

This old negro preacher is only one of many negroes who have set 
quietly to work to improve the conditions of their race. There is 
Dr. Boyer, the academic head of St. Augustine's. He is a graduate 
of Yale, a Doctor of Philosophy, and has even studied in Europe. 
Yet after all these advantages he has come back to the South and 
cheerfully and earnestly set himself the task of enlightening his 
people. 

Dr. Boyer is a friendly, white-haired negro with a suggestion of 
"befo' de wah" in his kindly smile and genial manners. When he 
graduated from normal school he made up his mind to go to college. 
He went to the president of Yale and said, "I have a good pair of 
hands, a light tenor voice and twenty-five dollars and I want a college 
education." He had no false pride, that inconvenient trait of the 
white race which the negro, fortunately for him, lacks. Dr. Boyer 
had no objection to letting the menial work of his hands be the 
means of educating his mind. With the combined efforts of his 
hands and his voice he worked his way through college. 

Dr. Boyer, I met recently at St. Augustine's when he took me 
around to visit the classes. In nearly every room the students rose 
as I entered and one of them on the front row placed a chair for me 
and handed me a text book. Then the class proceeded as if there had 
been no interruption, neither the teacher nor the pupils seeming in 
the least disturbed by visitors. Dr. Boyer followed the recitations 
closely with a twinkle in his eye, never failing to catch a pupil in 
even a minor mistake and asking questions which showed keen insight 
and savored of humor. I was especially interested in the primary de- 
partment. The teacher, a young girl just out of school, was so gentle 
and so patient with the children and the children themselves were 
adorable. Some of them glanced at me shyly out of the corners of 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 33 

their eyes and others grinned broadly. One little brown imp, seated 
elfinwise on his small chair, screwed his face into hideous contortions 
for my especial benefit. 

Dr. Boyer has kept alive the old negro "spirituals" by teaching 
them to the students. At night when the world is still, dusky figures 
glide in the soft starlight between the trees of the campus. One 
moment there is only the sound of the katydids chirping cheerfully in 
the trees and the frogs croaking in some nearby pond, then a low wail 
like the murmuring wind in the pines rises to the treetops. The wail 
takes form as a chanting melody and the words of "Deep River" or 
"Steal Away to Jesus," linger in the night air. Darkies love these 
old folk songs, for they are entirely their own and are the one original 
characteristic of their race which has been passed unchanged from 
one generation to another. 

A former librarian of one of the large industrial schools for negroes 
was once asked to address a Bible class of colored men and women 
in a mission district of New York. When she had finished her talk 
she said, "You know, when I was at school the students used to sing 
under my window at night and now that I have come away I miss 
the haunting melody of the spirituals. Would you sing some of them 
now ?" The white woman who taught the class nudged her anxiously. 
"Sh-h," she whispered. "They won't like that. They consider them- 
selves far above their slave ancestors and they think the spirituals are 
a relic of barbarism." But before she could say any more, the Bible 
class began to sway and they sang the old plantation melodies as only 
darkies can sing them. When the meeting was over they came up 
one by one, their eyes shining with tears. "Honey," they said, "we'se 
so glad you asked us to sing, it makes us feel like we wuz back home 
agen." 

The reaching out of the negro toward the ideals of the white race 
is the most promising sign of progress. When one of the workers was 
leaving St. Augustine's the darkies who lived in the community 
around the school came and begged her to stay. "If you'll just come 
and live among us, you and your mother, and help our girls to go 
straight," they pleaded, "we'll build you a house right here." 
3 



34 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

But as I have said, I do not like to think of the negro as a prob- 
lem. There are so many amusing anecdotes in connection with my 
quaint friends the "cullud'' folk that I want to tell them all and 
find it hard to choose from such an embarrassment of riches. By 
picking out a few of these stories I have tried to show the happy, 
singing nature of the negro and to express the friendly feeling toward 
them that I keep in my heart, tucked away with the tender memories 
of my old Mammy. 

Valedictory 

I am glad that I have this privilege of bidding goodbye to Saint 
Mary's. It is a privilege that makes me sad and glad at once. After 
a good senior year, which has brought each one of our Twenty-two 
very near together and has made us feel that our heart and spirit 
will always be linked in love with our Alma Mater, we wish the girls 
of Saint Mary's to know what they have meant to us. They have 
meant the finest of comradeship, the truest of friendship, and the 
very best co-operation in all things. They have made this year a 
beautiful one for us, one we shall never forget. We say goodbye to 
them, to the faculty who have been so sympathetic, to our Rector and 
to our Lady Principal and finally, with a regret it is impossible to 
express, to the members of the Class of '22 — we are leaving the shady 
grove, the tall white columns of Smedes Hall, East Rock, the old 
swing on Senior Hall with a firm desire to come back often to see 
these beloved spots that have become a real part of us. 

Mary "Wiatt Yarborough. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



The Class Day Exercises 

Class History 
1922 

The most extraordinary thing about our Senior Class is the fact 
that none of us went from Freshman to Sophomore, from Sophomore 
to Junior, and finally attained to the dazzling height of being Seniors, 
together. We all skipped one class or another. Many dropped by the 
wayside, as it were, and though we were saddened by their absence 
still we climbed ever onward and upward until now twenty-two of us 
have attained the much cherished diploma. 

A very few of us were "Preps" together. In those days we never 
dared dream of ever being Seniors. We merely wondered how they 
did it. 

With dear old "Hunk" Venable at our head we started on the four 
years towards graduation — four long years. But then we did not 
think very much about that happy, rather far off prospect. Every- 
thing was tinted with a rosy glow of romance. We were carefree, 
nothing worried us, for — we were Freshmen. 

"Sophomores, brave Sophomores." With "Hunk" Venable still 
our ambitious president, we toiled up the hill, seeking knowledge, 
much learning and many points. Thus the road to that far-off day 
in 1922 became shortened and the four years slipped into two. 

We are Juniors. Happy day! We wished to dare and do big 
things and, well, it is a hard matter to do big things when there are 
only eight of us. We Juniors aimed at originality and, with Mar- 
garet Huske as our president, we feel that we achieved our end. 
Never will we forget the fun and work of the Junior-Senior banquet, 
; the deep anxiety we all entertained as to whether there would be 
enough cocktails to go around, or the fear that somebody might in- 
cidentally be overlooked. Then the daisy chain — long hot hours of 
gathering in the bright harvest of happy faces, and in the wee, cold 
hours of the morning the making of them into a long chain of smiling 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



daisies ready to bid the Seniors a hearty good morning. But we 
loved doing it for the Seniors and now we can appreciate to the 
utmost the labor of you all, dear Juniors. 

Seniors ! How proud we were the day on which we arrived last 
September and heard the awe-filled whisper of a little new girl, 
"She's a Senior." As we look back on the days of the past year, full 
of joys and pleasures but not bereft of griefs — such as the many days 
spent wasting electricity in the vain endeavor to cram one more thing 
into our already supersaturated heads — we think how extremely 
lucky we were to have had such a wonderful president as Mary 
Louise. And now the day of days, the day on which we graduate, 
has arrived — the prep's fantasy, the Freshman's dream, the Sopho- 
more's desire, the Juniors hope and the Senior's prayer has been 
realized. 



The Class Poem 

For you, O shady grove, O little chapel ; 

For you, O stately oak trees, well known ways ; 
For you, O tall white columns, writ in mem'ry 

On other hearts, through countless by-gone days ; 
For all that keeps our faith in you, Saint Mary's — 

Our loyalty alive in every heart — 
With lips that frame a word of vain regretting, 

We breathe our love, our thanks before we part. 

For you, our friends, who every year have labored 

To make us all we are or hope to be, 
We leave a word in deep appreciation 

Of constant care and service, full and free ! 
But most of all to you, dear fellow classmates, 

And you, Saint Mary's girls who every day 
Have won our fullest measure of devotion — 

We leave that love which lips can never say ! 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 37 



The Prophecy of the Class of 1922 

Billy's Eventful Night 

Little Billy rubbed his eyes sleepily — it was seven-thirty o'clock in 
the night-time and very nearly the hour for his peaceful slumbers. 
But Billy was entirely too hilarious to be daunted by mere sleepy 
eyes — it was his "birfday" — his sixth birthday, in fact; so he took 
occasion to request what he felt sure would be forthcoming from his 
fond, doting parents. 

"Take me to the picture show, muvver, please. Daddy tin turn, 
too, if he'll be dood." 

It was not long before they were off. As soon as the little family 
was safely installed in their street-car seats, Billy burst out with this 
disconcerting remark, much to the embarrassment of his mother and 
father : 

"Oh, muvver ! Who is dat fat lady tummin' down the aisle ? I'se 
so scared dere won't be any woom for her when she sits down!" 

The question was answered unexpectedly by an unusually blond 
wash-lady, who jumped to her feet, upsetting a basket of clothes, 
meantime. 

"Why — why, by George ! Cheek ! I never would have known you. 
How — how did you ever happen to get so — fat ? You didn't used to 
be, at all." 

"Hi, Bud !" answered the plump one, her chuckles causing little 
quivers to ripple over her nice fat shoulders. "Didn't know I'd ever 
see you again, Frances Hoskins. Want to know the way I put on 
this flesh ? I used Dr. Fitchett's wonderful new discovery. You 
remember Fitchett, don't you ? I always did know she would dis- 
tinguish herself along some line." 

At this moment a slim, pretty creature bobbed up, and cried : 

"Cheek and Frances Hoskins ! Who'd ever have — why, where did 
you all — Oh, we're almost having a Saint Mary's reunion, all by 
ourselves, aren't we ?" 



38 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

"Hilda, you're as flower-like as ever!" exclaimed the fat lady. 
"You must have been living in a greenhouse all these years, to have 
kept so fresh and pink-looking." 

"No, indeed, Cheek. I've been with Ziegfeld Follies. It sure is 
the life, take it from me." 

This little episode was becoming decidedly boring for Billy. Be- 
sides, they had arrived at the corner for them to get off. Get off 
they did, and were very soon occupying their accustomed seats in the 
moving-picture theater. Billy always insisted upon the bald-headed 
row, which was an excellent point of view for Billy, but caused poor 
"muvver" and daddy much painful craning of necks. 

"Oh, oh, muwer!" squealed Billy, in unrestrained delight. "Isn't 
dat a pretty lady widin' that horse ? I didn't know dere was gonna 
be a circus at de picture show." 

"Hush, darling," cautioned mother; then, reading softly the cap- 
tion flashed upon the screen in a vain endeavor to silence Billy — "It 
says that is Miss Dariel Woodeson, the world's most renowned bare- 
back rider." 

"Ooo ! I see a whole lot o' snakes, muwer. Wonder why they 
don't eat that lady up ?" 

"It's because she's used to snakes, Billy. It says she was never 
afraid of animals, even when she was very young. She used to love 
to play with rats when she was at school. Her name is Miss Dorothy 
Nixon." 

A light was thrown on the screen. It seems that the circus scenes 
had come to an end. An unusual privilege it was that the audience 
was to have tonight. The services of a great operatic singer had been 
engaged, and the awe-inspiring name of the prima donna, Mademoi- 
selle Maria Wiatt Yarborough, sent a tremor of thrills throughout 
the house. 

Billy, not being of an artistic temperament, was glad when it was 
over, and the distinguished leader of the archestra, Miss Mary Louise 
Everett, waved her baton and started a perfect riot of crashing music 
to usher in the wild-west picture that was Billy's special delight. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 39 

"Who's the lady what beats the drum, 'Muwer' % She sho can 
make a heap of noise." 

There were quite a few of Billy's questions that stumped Mother 
for a reply, but the widespread reputation of the person in question 
made an answer easy. 

"That's a lady named Budge, Billy. They call her Miss Helen. 
You mustn't ask so many questions, honey." 

"Oh, you didn't wead me what it said that time. Who is de dirl 
that man is looking so sweet at, and who has such pretty turls V 

"That's Eva Lee Glass, the second Mary Pickford, Billy." 

"I'm sleepy, 'Muwer,' and they don't have any fighting in this 
picture. Let's go home." 

"All right," breathed Mother with a sigh of relief. 

Pop-corn was the next desire Billy expressed so away Daddy was 
dispatched as fast as he could go across the street to the pop-corn 
stand run by Beckwith, Forbes & Co. 

"Oh, dere's my balloon dirl, 'Muwer.' I wants a balloon." A 
fairy-like little creature danced up, whom Billy addressed as "Miss 
Libba" and from whom he demanded a "big, wed shiny one." 

"Et's not go home on de stweet car. Et's go on the bus, so that 
nice lady, Josey Posey, will take up our money." 

"Certainly, Billy," meekly acquiesced Mother. 

Soon after they had climbed upon the bus, and the "nice Josey- 
Kosey" had taken up their money, Billy's attentions were attracted 
by an alluring organ-grinder on the street. Billy was so fascinated 
by the capers of the monkey that he failed to note the conversation 
taking place at his side. 

"Minette, look there ! I do believe that's Muriel Dougherty down 
there." Even if she did play monkey for all the circuses at school 
I didn't think she'd spend her life playing with one." 

"ISTo, I didn't either, Winkie, but I bet she would be just as 
surprised to find out what a really successful pair of lawyers we 
are" — then glancing toward Billy — "isn't that an attractive child ?" 

"I don't like folks to call me an attwactive child," announced Billy 
in a loud tone, whereupon Mother blushed painfully. She was inex- 
pressibly glad when they reached their destination. 



40 Saint Maey's School, Bulletin 

"Now, Billy/' said Mother, as soon as Daddy had latched the door, 
"you run upstairs and put on your pajamas, and I'll get the glass 
of milk I told cookie to put on the ice for you." 

"Isn't Kitty Lee a nice cookie, 'Muwer' ?" enquired the irrepres- 
sible Billy. 

"Do as I say, Billy. Run right up to bed. Mother's coming." 

A terrible crash broke in upon Billy's and Mother's troubled domes- 
tic relations. Daddy rushed toward the dining room from which the 
fearful sound had come. Breathless, Billy listened to scuffling noises. 
After a moment Daddy reappeared, bringing the culprit firmly but 
gently by the arm, for the housebreaker was a woman. 

"Why, what does this mean, my good woman?" asked Daddy. 
"What is your name?" 

"Mary Harding, sir. I do hope you'll excuse me. I'm not in the 
habit of breaking into houses. I just did it tonight for a little 
excitement." 

It did not take much arguing and explanation to convince Daddy, 
because this was indeed an innocent looking lady. He let her go 
without further words. 

After Billy was all tucked in comfy, and had said his prayers, he 
murmured almost too softly even for Mother to understand, "You 
gonna let Wisey drive me down town tomorrow to hear the lady at the 
library tell stories ?" 

"Whom do you mean, Wisey ?" 

"Why, the chauffeur, Muwer. Don't you even know her name ?" 

"Yes, but it's not Wisey. It's Marion Wise, Billy." 

"But I calls her Wisey for short, Muwer. Will you let me?" 

"Let you what, Billy ?" 

"Go hear the lady wead, of course. Dat's what I said." 

"What lady?" 

"Miss Wincie, Muwer, the lady at the library." 

"Yes, yes, certainly, Billy," and Mother, leaning over, gave her 
troublesome young son a much move loving kiss than he deserved. 
And Billy, after an unusually exciting evening, even for him, sank 
into the dreamless, peaceful sleep of the very young. 

Lenoee Powell. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 41 



Last Will and Testament of the Class of 1922 

We, the Senior class of Saint Mary's School, of this city of 
Kaleigh, of this County of Wake, of this State of North Carolina, 
being of supposedly sound mind, memory, and understanding, do 
hereby make, publish, and declare the following as and for our last 
will and testament : 

Article 1. I, Mary Louise Everett, do hereby will and bequeath 
to Martha Saunders Best, my following accomplishments, to wit : 
presiding at Senior meetings, making wise and witty speeches at 
Alumnae luncheons and captivating audiences in dramatic club plays. 

Article 2. I, Lenore Christine Powell, do devise and bequeath to 
Marjorie West Willard, my string of crushes with the accompanying 
flowers, candy, dates in Senior Hall swing and adoring glances. 

Article 3. We, Josephine Mann Rose and Evalina Gilbert Beck- 
with, do hereby will to Lucy Fitzhugh Lay and Daisy Strong Cooper, 
our extraordinary ability to carry off Model Meetings, literary con- 
tests, and Annual debates, that they may succeed in impressing the 
societies as we have done. 

Article 4. I, Mary Wiatt Yarborough, do give and bequeath to 
Addie Currier Huske my unique talent for extracting back dues, to 
help her in financing the Muse, and to Mary Wilson Bohannan my 
"gift of gab" to help her bluff through Mr. Way's Philosophy as I 
have done. 

Article 5. We, Dorothy JSTixon and Julia Winston Ash worth, do 
will and bequeath to Elizabeth Higgins Ballou, Margaret Lucile 
Dempsey, and Van Cleve Wilkins, our cherished and sun-shiny room, 
■No. 11, Senior Hall, to be a dump heap and a place to have Senior 
meetings and parties. 

Article 6. I, Muriel Dougherty, do hereby assign to Caroline 
Pasteur Holmes, my rheumatic victrola and worn out records, notably 
the "Sweetheart of a Sigma Chi" and the "Sheik," to inspire her 
while studying with the view of winning the JSTiles Medal. 



42 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

Article 1. I, Elizabeth Lewis Lawrence, with deep regret do 
hereby will to Evelyn Lee Way, rny beloved and much used bubble 
pipe with which to while away some of the many hours she wastes 
when she should be studying. 

Article 8. I, Frances Springer Hoskins, do will to Elizabeth 
Bryan Rose my comfortable bed that sinks in the middle. 

Article 9. I, Eva Lee Glass, do will to Helen Bond Webb, my 
fascinating trinkets, to hang around her neck to amuse her in chapel. 

Article 10. I, Minnette Gordon Thompson, do will to Ida New- 
som Hinnant my capacity for shining for the Sigmas. 

Article 11. We, Eugene Marion Wise and Mary Louise Harding, 
do leave to Grace Elizabeth Barbour and Nellie Wynne, our habit of 
continually trotting down town and calling with the hope that they 
will take every opportunity of exercising their Senior privilege. 

Article 12. We, Kitty Lee Frazier and Dariel Beatrice Woode- 
son do bequeath to Claudia Jones the only privilege which the other 
Seniors cannot claim in common with us, namely not having to go 
to Chapel. 

Article 13. I, Susan Virginia Fitchett, leave to Virginia Gray 
Thigpen my alarm clock, hoping she will emulate my studious habits. 

Article 14. I, Josephine Lewis Forbes, do will to Van Cleve 
Wilkins, my pleasant task of illustrating the Annual. 

Article 15. I, Hilda Grace Turrentine, leave Leone Hines my 
numerous Kinston dates. 

Article 16. I, Elizabeth Warwick Cheek, leave to Edith Emogene 
Kiddick my propensity for acquiring the mumps at inopportune mo- 
ments, with the hope that it will not necessitate her missing the 
Junior-Senior banquet. 

Article 17. I, Louise Aiken Egleston, do bequeath to Lucy Lay, 
my pen of a ready writer. 

Article 18. I, Helen Porter Budge, do will to Laura Clark 
Smith my business ability. 

Article 19. We, the Senior Class, do will and bequeath to "Sweet 
William," our undying friendship and sincere thanks for his con- 
stant guidance during our stay at Saint Mary's. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 43 

Signed, sealed, published, and declared by the testator, the Senior 
Class, at its request and for its last will and testament, in the presence 
of each other, having hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses, this 
twenty-second day of May, nineteen hundred and twenty-two. 
Witnesses : Louise Aiken Egleston, 

Elizabeth Lewis Lawrence, 
Frances Springer Hoskins. 

Alumnae Who Attended Commencement 

Among those here to attend the Saint Mary's School Commence- 
ment exercises were : Miss Anne Kirtland, of Jacksonville, Fla. ; Miss 
Marjorie Nixon, of Hertford ; Miss Winifred Waddell, of Man- 
chester; Mrs. George Marshall, Jr., of Jacksonville, Fla. ; Miss Alice 
Cheek, of Henderson; Miss Frances Venable, of Chapel Hill; Miss 
Elizabeth Lay, of Chapel Hill ; Miss Elizabeth Tucker, of Plymouth ; 
Miss Nina Burke, of New Iberia, La. ; Mrs. F. H. McDonald, of 
Miami, Fla. ; Mrs. Kemp Lewis, of Durham ; Mrs. McRae, of Chapel 
Hill ; Mrs. W. A. Erwin, of Durham ; Mrs. Jack Glenn, of Winston- 
Salem ; Mrs. W. N. Everett and Mrs. Isaac London, of Rockingham ; 
Mrs. Alston, of Chapel Hill ; Mrs. Watkins Robards, of Sanford ; 
Mrs. Robert Davis, of Henderson ; Mrs. J. S. Holmes, of Chapel 
Hill ; Mrs. Walter Wichards, of Norfolk, Va. ; Mrs. Richard Stokes 
of Lynchburg, Va. ; Misses Dorothy Baum, of Salisbury, Md. ; Rains- 
ford Glass, of Orlando, Fla. ; Mabel Norfleet, of Tarboro ; Novella 
Moye, of Greenville ; Nancy Hart, of Tarboro ; Jane Toy, of Chapel 
Hill ; Katherine Batts, Tarboro ; Josephine Osborne, of Charlotte ; 
Katherine Drane, of Edenton; Olive Hughes, of Henderson; Rebe 
Shields, of Scotland Neck; Mary Yarborough, of Louisburg; Kath- 
erine Waddell, Manchester, N. C. ; Ellen Gibson McRae, Concord. 

Glass of 1918 Holds a Reunion 

On the day that the girls of the Class of 1918 graduated from 
St. Mary's they agreed to come back for the Commencement of 1922, 
for that was the Class to which they had just presented their colors 
of black and gold. 



44: Saint Mary's School Bfi/lethst 

And so in accordance with this agreement, four of the out-of-town 
members of the Class returned to the School on Saturday, May 20th, 
to get together again and to talk over the events of the past four 
years. The front ward in the Infirmary was turned over to them, 
and Miss Alexander was a most charming hostess. Those who came 
for the reunion were: Misses Aline Hughes, Novella Moye, Kath- 
arine Drane, and Mrs. Richard C. Stokes, who was Helen Laughing- 
house. A letter was received from "Ravie," — Estelle Ravenel, and 
telegrams from Agnes Pratt and Gertrude Pleasants telling of their 
regret at not being able to be present. 

There was no special stunt staged by the Class. At the Muse meet- 
ing held on Sunday night, which was informally presided over by 
Katharine Drane, the members of the Class sang a song hastily com- 
posed for the purpose by Aline Hughes. On Monday at the Alumnae 
luncheon the three town members of the class — Misses Bessie Folk, 
Katherine Hughes, and Mrs. Ross Pillsbury, (Maude Miller) — met 
with the other four girls and they all sat together at a table especially 
reserved for them. When Mrs. Way, the toastmistress of the 
occasion, referred to the reunion of the Class, Aline Hughes re- 
sponded with a short talk. 

All of the girls who came back agreed that reunions were just fine, 
and they decided to try to get every member of the class back for the 
Commencement of 1928. K. D. 



Saint lllary's School Bulletin 



A bulletin published quarterly in December, February, April and June, at 
Saint Mary's School, Raleigh, N. C, in the interest of the students and Alumnae. 
Address all communications to 

THE SAINT MARY'S SCHOOL BULLETIN, 
Saint Mary's School, 
Correspondence from friends solicited. Raleigh, N. C. 

COMMENCEMENT NUMBER, 1922 



Epsilon Alpha Pi 
Lenore Powell 

Louise Hairston 



Editors 



Associate Editors 



Sigma Lambda 
Lucy Lay 

Elizabeth Lawrence 



EDITORIALS 

At Commencement time the Saint Mary's skies seem bluer, and 
our friends seem nearer and dearer than ever before. It is hard to 
part — after a school year has spent itself, has made for itself its 
memories and its individuality, and has printed itself indelibly on 
our hearts' — the Seniors bid good-bye with a prayer in their inner- 
most selves for their Alma Mater, and tears in their eyes for the 
finest of days that are over. To those more than lucky girls who are 
coming back to take their places in Senior Hall, it should bring a 
joyful promise of the year to come, of friendships renewed and the 
possibility of even finer accomplishments in the future. It should 
bring new and greater loyalty to St. Mary's — it should, more than 
anything, be a time of tears and of smiles. L. P. 

Will you allow me space in which to make an appeal for greater 
interest on the part of the Alumnae in direct co-operation with the 
officers of the School in the matter of personal news of every alumna 
of the School, past or present ? 

Much work has been done and will be done this summer in an 
effort to publish a complete catalogue of all alumnae of Saint Mary's, 



46 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

and much of the desired information can be obtained only through 
the old girls. 

The suggestion is this : To perfect class organization by the elec- 
tion of a really efficient Class Secretary — one who has so much real 
school spirit that she will keep in touch with every member of her 
class, and with all other schoolmates, for that matter, and will send 
to the officers of The Bulletin from time to time all bits of informa- 
tion that she gleans. The Bulletin, for its part, will be glad to 
open a department — "News from the Classes and from Others" — and 
to publish therein all interesting information. 

It is of much interest to the girls of her time to know that M. McC, 
now Mrs. M., is going abroad this summer with Miss Fenner, of the 
School Faculty ; or that Mrs. Gov. B. is carrying out her own wishes 
and the noble impulses of her lamented husband by allying herself 
with the State organization in definite work for Social Service. 

W. E. S. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 47 



SCHOOL NEWS 

Contests of the Literary Societies 

On Monday, May 8th, was held the Annual Inter-Society debate 
of the Epsilon Alpha Pi and the Sigma Lambda Literary Societies. 
Miss Josephine Rose, President of the Sigma Lambda Society, pre- 
sided. The query was : "Resolved, That dependent children can be 
better cared for in private homes than in orphanages." The debaters 
were Lenore Powell and Louise Egleston, affirmative, representing 
the Epsilon Alpha Pi Society, and Adna Lee Bailey and Lucy Kim- 
ball, negative, representing the Sigma Lambda Society. The affirma- 
tive upheld their side with dignity and displayed a superior com- 
mand of English. Those upholding the negative had the advantage 
of an array of statistical material, so had to rely less upon sentiment 
and persuasion. The judges, Miss Mary Owen Graham, Rev. I. 
Harding Hughes, and Mr. Marshall LeLancey Haywood, decided 
unanimously in favor of the negative. At the close of the debate 
Miss Rose announced the result of the inter-society short story, essay, 
and poem contest. The judges, Miss Bertha A. Morgan, Miss Frances 
Bottum, and Mr. William E. Stone, had also decided in favor of the 
Sigma Lambdas. These two decisions won for the Sigma Lambda 
Society the cup for the year 1921-1922. We herewith give the story, 
essay, and poem that won the honors. 

"Brutus Was an Honorable Man" 

Cherryville was excited ! With one accord, the populace had 
turned out to see the installation of a brand-new motor truck in the 
shed of the local fire department. The town boasted two thousand 
progressive citizens, and this new safeguard of public property was 
their latest progressive move. 

But that was not all. Untried as yet, but ready and waiting to 
be called upon, towered the new siren whistle over the shed. It 
replaced the big bell, now cracked and rusty, which had served the 



48 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

hand and bucket brigade so faithfully for many years as a fire alarm. 
And now all was ready; and fire could be coped with successfully 
henceforward. And that was why Cherryville was excited ! 

Now Julius Brutus viewed all these proceedings with a mixture of 
satisfaction and anxiety. He was a true son of Hamy — aged ten 
years and two months (and nine days, to be exact) ; and his street life 
had sharpened his darky wits to a remarkable degree. The most at- 
tractive things about Julius Brutus, all agreed, were his eyes, their 
sparkling black pupils set in white circles which were big enough to 
suggest even such things as the dog with saucer-eyes, so vividly de- 
scribed in the "Tinderbox" ; and his pearly white teeth, almost al- 
ways visible to any one who came within range of J. Brutus' spar- 
kling eyes. For J. Brutus was a cheerful soul and smiled consistently 
on the world, in rain or shine. 

Julius Brutus, we observed, was both satisfied and anxious over 
the latest event in Cherryville. He had witnessed the mock fire drill 
when the new truck first arrived. And he had been immensely 
pleased and thrilled ! So much pleased and attracted was he indeed 
that at the very first pause in the drill he squirmed through the 
watching crowd on the sidewalk and climbed quickly and skillfully up 
on the truck. There among the coils of the big hose nestled Brutus, 
the dauntless, and the truck bore him off to the nearest water 
hydrant. Down sprang the men who were trying out the engine ; and 
off came the hose, rolling, tumbling out of the back of the truck as 
the end was dragged to the hydrant. And also out rolled Julius 
Brutus, unwinding and wallowing in the dust of the Cherryville 
Main street before the excited and amused eyes of half the village ! 
For Aunt Cindy, his mother, that was enough ! Gathering up her 
shaken and dusty offspring, she hastened home to whip him because 
as he said afterward "she was so glad I warn't kilt !" 

His father talked long and volubly of the new equipment over their 
peas, bacon, cornbread, and coffee that night. "Yas sir and when dat 
air siren whistle blows yer Uncle Pete's gwine ter be right dar ! Dat 
whistle makes a pow'ful lot er noise. Befo' de Lawd she do sound 
terrible !" 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 49 

Julius Brutus sat up and took notice. This was the first he had 
heard of a new whistle. 

"What become o' de bell V he inquired anxiously. 

"Law, chile, dat ole bell she cracked long ago," put in Aunt Cindy. 
"Ain't you hearn tell o' de new whistle?" 

"Kaw'm. They ain't blowed it yet." 

"N"aw. But you jest wait. Hit'll blow and scare you plumb out 
o' yer chair when it do," she declared, emphatically. 

Now, Julius Brutus was not afraid of many things. But this new 
siren whistle became on the spot a thing of terror for him. He began 
to dread the talk of a fire. The whistle must be awful. Pete said it 
was — sounded "jest like somebody a-dying an' a-moanin'." And so 
Brutus came to dread what he had wished for at first — a real occasion 
for the spectacular fire-drill, to which he had been an unfortunate 
party on one occasion. He waited in much the same way that Wil- 
liam Green Hill, in Aunt Minerva's hall, waited for the bell of the 
newly installed telephone to ring ; only Billy's waiting had been of a 
happily expectant variety, and Julius Brutus' long season of waiting 
was of an entirely different nature — gloomy, "trembly." 

Luck favored Cherryville and the timid-in-that-respect Julius Bru- 
tus for a while. Kerosene lamps consistently refused to be over- 
turned by frisky cows ; excelsior refrained nobly from setting fire to 
chimneys and roofs, though burnt at a furious rate in any one's front 
parlor grate ; and hot, stuffy attics could not be induced by any means 
to "spontaneously combust." Fire did not break out in Cherryville 
for many months. 

But all good things must have an end. The peace and comfort of 
the village suffered a jar one summer morning, when a particularly 
full wood-box, standing perilously near Mrs. Brown's kitchen range, 
smoked up and then blazed up in a brisk little conflagration ! The 
alarm was sent in, the neighbors frantically notified, and — 

Aunt Cindy, with her hands in the dough, stopped her work sud- 
denly as she heard it, rolled her white eyeballs with their Brutus-like 
pupils, and then : 



50 Saint Maky's School Bulletin 

"What dat ?" called her offspring from the next room, with a shade 
of interest in his voice. 

"Blest my soul, if it ain't a fire!" she answered, almost delightedly. 
"It's dat ole sireen whistle !" 

Julius Brutus stood and rolled his eyes a moment, undecidedly. 
Then, as the breeze bore home to him the deafening moans of Madame 
Siren, he gave one short whistle of his own, snapped his fingers hap- 
pily, and with the broadest of ear-to-ear grins on his black face, he 
ran swiftly down the street. 

"It never rains but it pours," the gloomy inhabitants of Cherry- 
ville would quote, sadly, to themselves and their families with every 
fresh outbreak. The novelty was beginning to wear off the thing now. 
Three fires in a week ? Well, such things did happen sometimes, 
they supposed. But why ? Weren't people just as careful now as 
they had always been — as they had been several months ago, when 
the fire-truck was new and nothing ever happened to call for the 
heroic work of its volunteer crew ? It was not the loss of property — 
that did not matter much, or had not yet, so far. It was generally 
chicken-coops, carriage sheds, and seemingly impossible things which 
caught. The last occasion had called the city's firemen to the rescue 
of several unused dog-kennels in somebody's back yard. Nothing 
serious, of course, but it was getting rather monotonous — in fact, 
boring — to the inhabitants to be "screamed" out of bed or out of 
office by the warning whistle, to see somebody's bee-hives or chicken- 
coops being valiantly sprayed, and the sitting hens spectacularly 
rescued. Something had to be clone about it — and something was 
about to be done about it, when suddenly it stopped. For five whole 
days Cherryville was allowed a respite. And then, on the sixth — - 

Well, anyhow, on the sixth the Mayor held a spoonful of soft- 
boiled egg about an inch above the cup, suspended it in mid-air, 
and sniffed. 

"Isn't that fire I smell, my dear ?" he asked his wife. 

"Why, I don't know — yes, I believe it is !" and she hurried out 
through the pantry door, followed at a distance of a few yards by her 
slow and portly husband. 



Saint Mary's School, Bulletin 51 

"The wood-shed, William!" she called, excitedly, as the flames 
met her eyes. 

"By Jove, it is !" he answered, hurrying his steps. "Better turn 
in the alarm, my dear," and he seized a bucket of water from the 
shelf by the porch pump, and hurried in the direction of the smoking 
wood-shed. 

It was soon over, and the hot and exhausted Mayor was looking 
over the slightly damaged out-house and woodpile, talking things over 
with the chief. 

"Pretty fishy, chief, I think," he remarked, shaking his head, 
thoughtfully. 

"Darned queer, I say!" answered his right-hand man. 

"And yet, what could be the reason?" the Mayor was musing. 
"Incendiaries generally go after big things." 

"Keeps the folks in a sight of a stir about who will be the next to 
get burnt out," the chief answered, ruefully. "Investigate, I say!" 

"What's this ?" Mr. Mayor suddenly exclaimed, his eye lighting 
upon a conveniently placed clue. 

"Well, I'll be jiggered!" exploded the officer, stooping to examine 
the object of the Mayor's surprise. The Mayor stooped, too, and 
over the edges of the woodpile their eyes met with a sympathetic 
gleam of understanding and enlightenment. For there, right under 
the corner of the shed and in full view (though till now entirely over- 
looked), was a neatly arranged pile of charred splinters and traces 
of kerosene on the dry earth around it. 

The Mayor walked slowly down the street to his office that morn- 
ing. Things were on his mind. And something that he had never 
met with before had cropped up in little Cherryville. A problem not 
easy to solve had presented itself to the Mayor, and he was struggling 
over the solution. 

Walking with his head slightly bent and his cane hanging loosely 
from the crook in his arm, he was oblivious to the crowd he was 
approaching. Several small boys, colored and white, were engaged 



52 Saint Maky's School, Bulletin 

in shooting marbles on the smooth sidewalk. Intent on their game, 
they did not notice the Mayor's approach, but continued their shoot- 
ing and conversation. 

"And the wood-shed 'most burnt up this mornin', up to de 
Mayor's," remarked one. 

"Yessir, and they say it wuz the beatinest sight to see him totin' 
a bucket er water out thar." 

The Mayor pricked up his ears. 

"Your shot, Julius Brutus. Did you go ter the fire?" 

"You bet. I lak 'em. Wish dat whistle 'ud blow ev'y day!" 

The Mayor did not stop. He walked sedately and discreetly on. 
But in his eyes was the first gleam of understanding — the new 
development in the case. 

During the day he called his wife on the telephone. 

"My dear" (he always called her "my dear" — only that it sounded 
like "m'dear," with a big accent on the "dear") — "My dear, is Aunt 
Cindy washing for you today ?" 

"She is that ! In the back yard right now," she answered. 

"Well, when she gets through, tell her to get that lazy husband of 
hers and Julius Brutus and come to my office." 

"Yes, dear; you want to pay her off?" she inquired. 

"Well — yes, I do," the Mayor assented, relieved that she suspected 
nothing else and was not inclined to question the object of this inter- 
view. 

At 1 o'clock Aunt Cindy presented herself, puffing and blowing, 
but with the profoundest of courtesies, before the Mayor's desk. 

"Good morning, Aunt Cindy," the "Judge" spoke, kindly. "And 
where are those two men of yours ?" 

"Dey's out yonder, suh. W T ant 'em ter come in?" 

"Yes, Aunt Cindy ; call them in." 

She went to the door, and, while she was inviting the gentlemen 
in, the Mayor pushed a button on the wall. 

"Sit down there, Dobbs," he said to the young clerk who answered 
his ring. "I'll need you for a witness in this case. But, mind you, 
it's private. ISTot a word about it outside this office!" 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



The young man nodded. He didn't get the "hang of things." But, 
then, his chief was in the habit of doing hasty and inexplicable things. 
This was just another one of them, he guessed. 

"Sit down there in front of me, Julius Brutus," the chief com- 
manded, as the trio reentered the office. He motioned the mother 
and father to a bench by the wall. Then, very leisurely and luxuri- 
ously, the Mayor leaned back and, knocking the ashes from his cigar 
end, regarded the mystified Julius Brutus. 

"Good many fires going on around here lately," he observed, briefly 
and casually. The occupant of the chair in front of him gave the 
quickest of nervous starts, and then quickly recovered himself. With 
the brightest of black and white grins, he answered : 

"Yas, suh; I have been gwine to 'em." 

" 'Bout the first one there every time, aren't you, Brutus ?" The 
Mayor led him on. 

"Yas, suh — to help put 'em out!" Julius Brutus was fast regain- 
ing his composure. Then, suddenly, the Mayor dropped his skillful 
and insinuating tactics. His face took on a look of stern ferocity as 
he banged his fist on the table and looked at the culprit. 

"Why did you set my woodshed on fire this morning?" he thun- 
dered. 

Julius Brutus jumped as if something had shot him. His mother 
and father sat, horrified, frightened, speechless, against the wall. 
Dobbs looked on, amazed, silent. 

Julius Brutus grabbed the sides of the chair ; he steadied himself ; 
he swallowed; then he looked up to meet the accusing eyes of the 
Mayor across the table and to see that powerful fist doubled up, still 
where it had landed a minute before, and dropped his eyes. All was 
still for a moment, and then, slowly: 

"Well ?" said the Mayor. 

Then Julius Brutus got up ; he took a step forward from his seat, 
and threw his head back, and very defiantly and clearly came the 
shocking words : 

"Because I laks ter hear dat whistle blow!" 



54 Saint Maky's School Bulletin 

The "Judge" was quite taken aback. He expected lies, and he 
got the truth; he expected a shameful cowardice, and he met a bold 
defiance on the part of the undaunted Julius Brutus. The pair on 
the bench were regaining their power of speech. 

"Wal, I never !" ejaculated Pete, surprised, but not particularly 
anxious concerning the awful consequence of Julius Brutus' crime. 

But Aunt Cindy was down on her knees. " 'Fore de Lawd, Marse 
Mayor, I never knowed he done it ! He ain't 'sponsible ! I'll pay 
yer for it — an' I'll beat him, too. But, Lawsy, Massa, don't send 
him to jail!" she pleaded. 

"That's what they generally do with incendiaries, Aunt Cindy," 
the Mayor remarked, coldly. 

"I dunno 'bout dat, Massa, but he ain't one! He's jest my only 
little boy! He's jest Julius Brutus, and it's Cindy's fault fer not 
watchin' him. Lemme have mah child, Massa, and I'll do better by 
him!" she vociferated. 

Julius Brutus slipped one grimy arm around her old neck and 
tried to stop her sobs. The Mayor was touched. Suppose he had 
not taken proper care of his own boy, to keep him out of the streets 
and out of temptation! His voice softened. 

"Get up, Aunt Cindy," he said. "Nothing is going to happen to 
your boy unless he says so." 

Julius Brutus prudently kept silent. The Judge again addressed 
Aunt Cindy: 

"How long have you been washing for my wife ?" he inquired. 

"Nigh on to twenty years, suh," she answered, relieved at his 
kindly inquiries, and wiping away her tears. Suddenly the Mayor 
broke off again : 

"Has Julius Brutus got any sense, Aunt Cindy ?" 

"He has dat, suh ; he one of de brightest, smart young 'uns I ever 
see!" Julius Brutus nodded in assent. The "Judge" was impressed 
with his prisoner and the pleading mother. 

"See here, Julius Brutus ; it's up to you. You can have a chance. 
I'm going to give you one. You'll take your choice of going to a 
home for bad boys, where you'll learn not to make any more fires ; or 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



you'll come up to my house to work — to do whatever I want you to 
do — cut the wood and make all the fires we have — in the grate. Take 
your choice!" 

Brutus' face lit up with the joy of relief and expectation. He 
regarded his benefactor with a smile of appreciation, and, with the 
slightest symptom of a twinkle in the sharp black eyes, said : 

"I'm choosin' yer woodpile, Judge." 

The Mayor laughed long and heartily. The three waited till he 
was through. Then he turned to Aunt Cindy. 

"Unless you and Pete tell this, it won't be known, because it's a 
secret between Julius Brutus and the Mayor, and they aren't going 
to tell. Send Julius Brutus to my house to work early tomorrow 
morning. That is, if he is going to do better. Are you, Brutus ?" 

"Yassir, you bet!" he answered, gratefully. 

"And is there anything else you'd like before you go ?" inquired 
the Mayor. 

"Yassir." 

"What is it?" 

"I'd like to hear the sireen whistle blow !" 

And that is the reason why the fire whistle in Cherryville (for no 
reason that the citizens could fathom) blew steadily for fifteen 
minutes one summer afternoon. 

Louise Egleston. 



56 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



1492 

Silver sails on a silver sea, 

A path of sparkling sheen; 
Light on the boss of tall mast tree, 

Glimpse of a far-down green. 

Three small ships on oceans wide, 

Sailing to unknown seas — 
When will they move to flow of tide 

Or feel the soft land breeze? 

The weary days and weary nights 

There on the lonely sea ; 
Naught but the stars' cold, shining lights, 

Their pennons waving free. 

Early sun on the shining sea, 

With low, green land ahead ; 
Welcome sight of a waving tree, 

Earth for the touch of lead. 

A new world spreads before their eyes, 

Green tree and golden sand. 
Backward each small bark homeward hies, 

To tell of new-found land. 

Eva Lee Glass. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 57 



Folk Songs of the American Negro 

We who have so often been lulled to rest by our mammies' quaver- 
ing voices have seldom realized the value of the quaint and charming 
lullabies they sang. We have almost overlooked the fact that these 
folk songs are the greatest gift which the African race has con- 
tributed to our America. Song has always been an outstanding 
characteristic of the negro, from the savage of the jungles to the 
negro of today. 

The first slaves were brought to America in 1619, before the Pil- 
grims landed. These broken-hearted strangers, through their bitter 
sorrows, comforted their souls with songs. They developed their 
primitive tribal melodies in their new environment and laid the 
foundation of the rich and varied folk lore of today. 

Song was to the negro the sole means of expressing his emotions 
and feelings, and he has made splendid use of this unique means. 
We may more easily understand him from a careful study of his 
songs, for they portray his character to perfection. We may form 
the truest judgment of his character and disposition from them, for 
they are songs which are intimately connected with the singer's work 
and his play, his joy and his sorrow ; and they are his expressions of 
things temporal and spiritual. With song, he has covered his life, 
evoking joy, beauty, and hope from within himself. 

The negro folk songs cover such a wide range of feeling that one 
scarcely knows where to start. One finds lilting, soothing lullabies 
crooned by a loving mother to her baby, vital, martial work songs, 
catchy corn-shucking and cotton-picking songs, love songs, and, lastly, 
those which have been proved most beautiful and worthwhile — the 
spirituals. 

The cotton and corn harvesting melodies constitute a class most 
interesting to many. For, as Carlyle has written, "Give us, oh, give 
us the man who sings at his work ! Be his occupation what it may, 
he is equal to any of those who follow the same pursuit in silent sul- 
lenness. He does more in the same time — he will do it better — he 
will persevere longer." In many cases a man with a good voice was 



58 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

paid to lead the negroes in singing at their work on the plantations, 
simply because they did their work more skillfully and because they 
were kept in the best of humor. Most of these work songs are simply 
spontaneous lines characterizing an impulsive overflow of high spirits, 
and full of local allusions. They moulded monotonous toil into a 
form of rhythmic life. 

While the working-songs are practically all the reflection of a happy 
life of toil, the spirituals, which have been judged the most musical, 
are permeated with a strain of suggestive sadness. But these, curi- 
ously enough, never seem to convey a spirit of revolt or hopeless 
despair. At moments, even in the most despairing of them, there 
floats out a triumphant note as if the veil of darkness suddenly had 
been lifted and some fair world beyond had revealed itself. One of 
these inspirational moments is readily to be perceived in the follow- 
ing song, the first line of which is sung in recitative style, while the 
other lines, serving as a refrain and repeated several times, convey 
the mood characteristic of the plantation negro, the momentary drift- 
ing from sadness to joy: 

Nobody know who I am, who I will be till de coram' day ; 
O de Heav'n bells ringin', 
De sing-sol singin', 
Heav'n bells a-ringin' in mah soul. 

In a general way, we know how they were produced. Most were 
slowly and painfully put together at religious meetings. One person 
sang a phrase and other voices joined in the answer, and thus a new 
song was worked out, composed by many. This was generally the 
case ; so we are not able to attribute one song to an author, except in 
a very few cases. 

"Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," which is one of the best-loved of 
the spirituals originated in the soul of an old negro, Sarah Sheppard. 
Almost crazed by the thought of being separated from her baby, who 
had been sold to a new master, she was hurrying to a river to drown 
herself. An old mammy stopped her and spoke earnestly: "Don't 
you do it, honey; don't you do it. Jest you wait and let de chariot 
of the Lord swing low." The words had such an effect on her that 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 59 

she gave up her design and allowed herself to be carried off. But 
with those words she comforted herself, and the song grew in her 
heart and passed to others, until it reached its final state. 

The origin of "Steal Away to Jesus," another spiritual, is also very 
interesting. A band of slaves who had been in the habit of going 
across the river from their plantation for services at a mission, were 
told by their master for several reasons not to go. He feared that the 
missionary might try to induce them to run away. But the slaves 
could not forget the gracious words of the missionary, and they 
decided that they would go in secret — that they would steal away to 
Jesus, as one expressed it. And so the song began. Whenever there 
was to be a service, the negroes would chant softly at their work about 
sunset, "Steal Away to Jesus." At night, when all was still, they 
crept from their cabins to the river, and rowed swiftly across, sing- 
ing as they went, so that the missionary would know of their ap- 
proach, and then on the other side they would lift their voices and 
sing from the depths of their hearts : 

Steal away, steal away, steal away to Jesus. 
Steal away, steal away home. 

I ain't got long to stay here. 
My Lord calls me, He calls me by the thunder, 
The trumpet sounds within-a my soul ; 

I ain't got long to stay here. 

By these two examples we see that there was gloom as well as 
sunshine in the life of the slaves, and so we have songs that are gay 
as well as grave. Their most important and noteworthy characteristic 
is one which is impossible to put on paper. The musical manner in 
which they are sung by their creators and their descendants is 
inimitable. 

In a study of the hundreds of folk songs, we would notice that the 
finest ones are the fruits of suffering undergone and the hope of 
deliverance from bondage at death. We would also notice that there 
is practically no middle ground; they express the two extremes of 
emotion, joy and sorrow. We would be made to realize that they are 
the expressions of the true life of a people. 



60 Saixt Mary's School Bulletin 

About eighteen hundred and fifty, when these songs were first 
noticed to a large extent, they began to exert an influence on Ameri- 
can popular music which has continued to this day. 

At first this influence showed itself in the songs which were writ- 
ten for the popular minstrels of that time. The writers employed 
their rhythm, keys, and dialect, to produce many catchy songs. The 
most notable and important of these productions is Dixie which was 
written for the Emmett Troup. From that time on, the folk songs 
influenced our popular songs and many have claimed that these gave 
the vital stimulus to the ragtime of today. 

Stephen Foster, of Kentucky, who has been called the American 
Song Writer took these melodies and derived from them many ap- 
pealing melodies such as "Old Black Joe," and "My Old Kentucky 
Home." He used the melodies as models rather than as material 
from which to take ideas, in them we do not find parts of the origi- 
nals, they are songs which embody the spirit of the negroes rather 
than songs which are exactly like them in all respects. 

Among the many composers who have used the folk songs as ma- 
terial for music of great artistic worth, Antonin Dvorak ranks 
highest. The famous Bohemian composer, while he was making a 
visit to America heard some of these songs, and decided to write a 
symphony to show to the world their untold importance as themes 
for musicians. He gave his production, "The Isew World Sym- 
phony" to the world shortly afterward, explaining how he had drawn 
his themes straight from the music of the southern plantation negroes. 
At that time he wrote : "I have been led to believe that these melodies 
are the most musical and beautiful songs to be found this side of the 
water, by the fact that most Americans unconsciously express the 
same belief. What songs would stop an American when he was in a 
foreign land ? They are few, but the most potent and beautiful of 
them are the so-called plantation melodies." 

It is fitting also to mention here, Samuel Coleridge Taylor, though 
not of American birth, he is of African descent and has shown him- 
self most interested in the development of compositions from these 
songs as themes. He has taken many negro melodies and evolved 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 61 

from them charming compositions. His piano transcriptions of 
"Sometimes I Feel Like a Motherless Child," and "Steal Away to 
Jesus," are really gems of their class. 

But of the large number of composers who have worked on 
Dvorak's theory, the one in which we are most interested is an Ameri- 
can negro, Henry T. Burleigh. As a small boy he was so much in- 
terested in music, that he once became very ill with pneumonia, be- 
cause of exposure, when he stood knee-deep in the snow outside of a 
house where there was a concert. This fact brought him to the at- 
tention of several people who immediately set about giving the boy 
the music he craved without endangering his life. He was given a 
scholarship at the National Conservatory of Music in New York, and 
it was there the friendship between the young colored man and 
Antonin Dvorak was formed, Dvorak being musical director of the 
Conservatory. It was Burleigh's singing of the old Negro melodies 
which gave to Dvorak that contact with Negro folk-music which 
formed the background for the themes of his own creating in the 
New World Symphony. As a concert singer he always used some of 
the folk songs and looked upon them as living proof of the triumph of 
the spirit of the negro over oppression and humiliation. He has 
transcribed many of the old melodies and composed new ones, of great 
artistic worth. 

The most important value of the songs is the fact that they are 
true folk songs and as nearly as it is possible for any to be so, they 
are American folk-songs. Dr. Henry E. Krehbiel, one of our most 
eminent musical critics, is a strong supporter of this theory. He 
writes : Is it not the merest quibble to say that these songs are not 
American % They were created in America under American in- 
fluences and by people who are Americans in the same sense that any 
other element of our population is — every element except the aborigi- 
nal element. And Science seems to have answered that even the red 
men do not constitute an aboriginal element. The 10,000,000 negroes 
in the United States are native-born, and speak the language of Ameri- 



62 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

can folk songs. The songs are folk songs in the truest sense ; that is, 
they are songs of a folk, created by a folk, giving voice to the 
emotional life of a folk ; for which life America is responsible. 

Musicians have never been so conscious as now of the value of folk 
song elements. Music is seeking new vehicles of expression and is 
seeking them where they are most sure to be found, in the field of the 
negro folk songs. This field of ours is most fertile and should be 
cultivated. There is no doubt that America has proved to be the 
gainer musically from the unfortunate people first brought to this 
our country as slaves. Lucy Fitzhugh Lay. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 63 

Recitals in Music Department 

Miss Egleston in Certificate Recital 

Miss Louise Egleston was presented in a piano recital by her 
teacher, Mr. William H. Jones, director of Music at Saint Mary's 
School, in the Auditorium on the evening of Saturday, April the 22d. 
She was assisted by Miss Evelina Beckwith, who sang charmingly a 
group of Bird Songs by Liza Lehman. Miss Egleston showed her 
artistic musical ability in the rendition of her recital which was the 
culmination of her work for a certificate in piano. The program 
follows : 

Sonata — Opus 13, First Movement Beethoven 

Polonaise in C Sharp Minor Chopin 

Arabesque No. 2 Debussy 

Country Gardens Grainger 

Bird Songs Liza Lehman 

The Woodpigeon 

The Yellowhammer 

The Owl 

Romance Schumann 

Concert Waltz Moszkowski 

Certificate Recital 

On Wednesday night, May the 10th, Mr. William H. Jones pre- 
sented Miss Bessie Brown, of Greenville, ~N. C, in her Voice Certifi- 
cate Recital. Miss Brown sang with lovely, smooth tone, emotional 
depth and varied expression. Naturally gifted with unusual vocal 
powers which give promise of a singer of rare qualities, she showed 
splendid interpretative ability, as well as technical ease and finish. 
She was ably assisted by Miss Helen Powell, pianist who played 
Mendelssohn's Rondo Capriccioso with understanding. The program 
follows : 

Voi Che Sapete Mozart 

Turn Ye to Me Old Scotch Melody 

Minnelied Brahms 

The Lorelei Liszt 

The First Primrose G-rieg 

Rondo Capriccioso Mendelssohn 



64 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

Micaela's Aria from Carmen Bizet 

Lullaby Cyril Scott 

The Answer Terry 

Alumnae Lamcheon 

On May 12, 1922, the annual Alumnae Luncheon was held in Saint 
Mary's dining-room to celebrate the founding of the school in 1842. 
Several long tables were reserved for the Alumnae, a large number 
of whom were present. The students, dressed in white, occupied the 
tables surrounding the Alumnae. Mr. Way was a delightful toast- 
master, and the responses from the Alumnae and officers showed a 
great amount of feeling and Saint Mary's spirit. After the responses 
of the Alumnae, the present Senior Class was well represented by a 
clever little speech from their president, Mary Louise Everett. Af- 
ter the various toasts, "Hail Saint Mary's" was sung, the school was 
dismissed by Miss Morgan, and the Alumnae adjourned to their 

meeting in the parlor. M. 

School Party 

On May 13th, the school was invited to the "Class Party" in the 

parlor. Strange to say, it was not an occasion of gayety. The various 

classes came into the soft-lighted parlor singing "In a Grove of 

Stately Oak Trees." First came the Preps dressed as little girls ; 

following them, the Freshmen, dressed in white with purple and 

lavender ruffs and caps ; the Sophomores next in line wore white with 

green and white ruffs and caps ; next came the Juniors wearing a 

maid's costume of scarlet and grey decorated with a "'23." Finally, 

a slow procession of cap-and-gowned Seniors entered the room and 

were seated in a semi-circle at the end of the parlor. After an 

address of welcome by Miss Everett, President of the Senior Class, 

the following program was carried out : 
Responses and Class Songs. 
The Senior Medley. 
Echoes of the Year. 

On Bobbing the Hair. 

Spring Clothes. 

I Don't. 

Sweet William. 

Echoes of the Junior-Senior Banquet. 
An Appreciation. 
Toasts. 



Saint Mary's School Bulletin 



Then the Junior-maids served an ice course which was followed 
by "Farewells" and "Alma Mater." Each girl, brushing away tears 
from her eyes, with a sob bade the Seniors good night and wished 
them much happiness as alumnae. 

The Chorus Class appeared before the Raleigh public on Monday 
night, the 15th of May in Gilbert and Sullivan's popular comic 
opera ''The Mikado." We quote from the Neivs and Observer of 
the following day : 

The presentation of Gilbert and Sullivan's ''The Mikado" by the chorus 
class of Saint Mary's School in the school auditorium was a splendid success, 
continuous bursts of applause, during the performance being well-merited by 
the young ladies. An audience that taxed seating accommodations and 
standing room to capacity heartily enjoyed the feminine version of the 
popular opera. 

As is well-known, the success of "The Mikado" hinges largely on the work 
of Ko-Ko, Lord High Executioner of Titipu, who bears the comic burden of 
the light and tuneful piece and must possess laugh-provoking ability. Ko-Ko 
in the person of Miss Muriel Dougherty did not fail. This young lady turned 
out to be a comedienne of pleasing ability, and despite her vocal shortcomings 
played the part of Lord High Executioner in such a manner as to bring 
private comments of "Isn't she cute?" "Wasn't she fine?" etc. Misses Jose- 
phine Gould and Sarah Harrell played the other two comic roles, those of 
Pooh-Bah and Katisha most effectively. 

Miss Bessie Brown, as Nanki-Pooh, sang the tenor parts of the second 
trombone with a clear and high-pitched voice. Pleasing in the vocal work 
were the three wards of the Lord High Executioner, Miss Eunice Stockard 
as Peep-Bo, Miss Helene Higgs as Pitti-Sing, and Miss Marjorie Page as 
Yum- Yum. Miss Page and Miss Evelina Beckwith as Pish-Tush were given 
much applause for their fine acting and singing. 

The artistic scenery was painted by the art students. This and the color- 
ful costumes of the chorus of nobles and girls added much to the harmonious 
effect of the production. 

Mr. William H. Jones directed the performance in his excellent manner, 
assisted by Miss Ethel Abbott at the piano and by the Ray orchestra. 

We feel that much credit is due the chorus, and especially to Miss Weeks 
who worked untiringly and patiently over the production for several months. 

"The Cross Triumphant" 

On May 10th in the Cathedral Close at Washington, D. C, a 
pageant was given for the benefit of the endowment fund for Saint 
Mary's School. It was the work of the Saint Mary's Alumna? and 
5 



66 Saint Mary's School Bulletin 

other generous friends of the School in Washington, and the rest 
of us still stand a little awed at the daring of the undertaking and the 
immensity of the production. 

We feel that Mrs. W. C. Rivers, Mrs. Carey Brown and all the 
other splendid workers have done a far-reaching service for their 
Alma Mater ; for the beauty of the conception, the magnificence of 
the costuming, the finished quality of the presentation and the dis- 
tinguished personnel raised the event to one of national interest. 

"The Cross Triumphant" was written, at the solicitation of Mrs. 
Rivers, especially for Saint Mary's, by Mrs. Marietta Minnegerode 
Andrews and in seventeen scenes depicts the history of the Church 
from the time of Joseph of Arimathea to the present day, with inter- 
ludes showing the influence of Art, Music, Drama, and Poetry on 
religion. 

The spirit of reverence with which the wonderfully spectacular 
scenes were given found a fitting climax in the last scene. Here a 
cross, illuminated, on the heights was surrounded by angels, while 
at the foot clustered all the participants in the pageant, monks, 
crusaders, explorers, Indians, bishops, nearly a thousand in number, 
all with arms outstretched to the cross while the Doxology was sung. 

One scene of especial interest was "The Founding of Saint Mary's 
School," representing the opening day of school ; an old stage coach, 
piled high with old-fashioned luggage arrives, bringing the first 
girls, who are delightfully costumed in the quaintest of dresses, pan- 
talettes and pan-cake hats. They are met by Dr. Aldert Smedes, 
the founder, Mrs. Smedes and several teachers and girls and are 
given a welcome to the school. Miss Ethel Bagley sponsored this 
group and several who took part in it were real Saint Mary's 
descendants. 

It is hoped that this beautiful pageant may be reproduced some 
day in the fitting setting of Saint Mary's grove. 

Annie Root Vass. 






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